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# 138120 20-Dec-2013 10:19
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This just in for the Chorus equivalent in the UK:

"Broadband and telephone line faults must be repaired within two days, according to new rules published by the telecoms regulator today. Ofcom said that Openreach, the BT subsidiary that maintains Britain’s fixed-line telephone network, should be required to meet new performance standards after concerns that faults were taking too long to be fixed. Openreach should rectify 80 per cent of faults within one or two days of being notified, Ofcom said, regardless of the weather. The demand, set out by the telecoms regulator in a consultation today, comes after wet weather last year led to long delays for line repairs and new connections."

Full story in The Times here .





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  # 955472 20-Dec-2013 13:34
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Wonder if they have the same restoration of service conditions for the power companies over there "regardless of the weather"??




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  # 955474 20-Dec-2013 13:41
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old3eyes: Wonder if they have the same restoration of service conditions for the power companies over there "regardless of the weather"??


Yes. Also for water and gas companies.





 
 
 
 


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  # 955664 20-Dec-2013 22:48
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Every time I hear ofcom doing something, its always followed by the description of something stupid.

Sure a 48 hour resolution is a good idea, but without a force majeur clause for bad weather its just not possible. They would have to bus in bulk linesmen after a flood which in many cases its not practicable after small scale weather events.

Just thinking of that cabinet that was on here a while ago - got hit by the car, I think broadband was down for a few days.
The only way chorus could fix that faster according to ofcom's mentality would be to get more people to work on the problem, but that would cause a "too many cooks spoil the wiring plan" situation.




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  # 955674 20-Dec-2013 23:54
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To be fair, there is the catchall of "in 80% of cases"... But generally yeah, these are wildly popular with the general public, providing the general public chooses to avoid thinking about the longer term impacts of forcing expensive practices on companies.

If Chorus had to fix the vast majority of faults withing a short timeframe, AND HAD A BOTTOMLESS CHEQUEBOOK, they could do it. They could have dozens of whole spare cabinets prebuilt and ready around the country, with helicopters in every town and teams of technicians ready to go 24*7. They could have concreting contractors on permanent retainer, on 24*7 callouts to rebuild bases, or to put knocked over poles back in the ground as soon as they are notifed.

They _could_ do that, if customers wanted to pay, or if the government wanted to fund it.

Whether or not customers (on the whole), or the government want that badly enough to fund it is left as an exercise for the reader.

So I'm glad in the UK at least there's an 80% mitigation in there.

CHeers - N




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Please note all comments are the product of my own brain and don't necessarily represent the position or opinions of my employer, previous employers, colleagues, friends or pets.


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  # 955689 21-Dec-2013 06:28
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I'd say that over 80% of jobs I ever have to lodge with Chorus for faults result in a technician visiting a site either that day or the following day. This clearly does depend on workload, but with exceptions such as large scale weather related incidents I find virtually all faults resolved within 48 hours.

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  # 955742 21-Dec-2013 10:39
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Chorus can easily fix 80% of all jobs on 2 days. And they probably do.

The issue with faults these days is ISPs screw up the faults process meaning a job isn't even lodged at Chorus within a timely manner. Telecom are by far the best at managing the faults/provisioning process. My belief is because at the end of the day the systems in place are Telecom built. Unbundling has lead to so so many issues wit providers that dont understand the process.
There is also the issue with providers scare mongering about the customer being charged a $200 fault fee. People seem to have an issue with this even of their service isn't working.

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  # 955750 21-Dec-2013 11:02
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Most cable faults these days are service given (customer given temp service on other pair or a jack up in the network ) then referred to cablefaultman who have up to 21 days to fix the main fault

 
 
 
 


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  # 956137 22-Dec-2013 12:10
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chevrolux: Chorus can easily fix 80% of all jobs on 2 days. And they probably do.

The issue with faults these days is ISPs screw up the faults process meaning a job isn't even lodged at Chorus within a timely manner. Telecom are by far the best at managing the faults/provisioning process. My belief is because at the end of the day the systems in place are Telecom built. Unbundling has lead to so so many issues wit providers that dont understand the process.
There is also the issue with providers scare mongering about the customer being charged a $200 fault fee. People seem to have an issue with this even of their service isn't working.



This is not Scare mongering this is the cost if the Technician finds no fault or its a CPE issue, the RSP has to advise because if they dont and it's a CPE issue they RSP would end up having to foot the bill, the amount of people out there that go "My equipment is perfect theres nothing wrong, it was working yesterday fine." You mention the fault fee, they decide to do a isolation test and you find out they have a extension cable/double adaptor/Faulty filter is mind boggling.

aw

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  # 958535 29-Dec-2013 10:11
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It can be scary especially if the fault is intermittent. In my case of the below fault I have enough knowledge and tools to be confident that there was a problem and to convince Xnet/Chorus of the problem, but I think the fault I had lately would really confuse your typical residential user and/or residential ISP helpdesk tech.

I had an off-again, on-again fault with my own home line where the (naked) VDSL would go from a fantastic 30/10 connection down to an unstable 2/0.5 or no connection at all on some days. This with all-new cat-6 wiring from the demarc direct to a 7RU wall cabinet with the MP264 modem inside (no master splitter).

It took me a couple of weeks to work out that it was weather dependent, then another couple of days to convince Xnet of this, then a few more weeks to get a Chorus tech to  turn up in the right weather and right time of day to actually find the fault.

The problem turned out to be a cable short between the street plinth and the demarc - but it would only short out on warm sunny (22+ degree) afternoons, not the kind of weather you'd expect of a weather-dependent fault. Fixed by switching to the other line pair. But a fault that took four separate Chorus tech visits (plus one no-show) to finally have them find. Visits 1-3  (and 4 where the tech only visited the exchange even though I'm on a cabinet?) all were 'no fault found'.

A non-confident residential user (such as my grandmother) may be too scared of the fee to get something like that fixed.

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  # 958542 29-Dec-2013 10:32
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moving toward to the fibre world, I wonder how many techs, won't correctly ID faulty sfp's.

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  # 958595 29-Dec-2013 13:09
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kornflake: moving toward to the fibre world, I wonder how many techs, won't correctly ID faulty sfp's.


A SFP is not used in UFB. It's only used if you're getting a glass only HSNS connection where Chorus don't supply the media converter or dark fibre where the end user supplies the electronics.




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  # 958611 29-Dec-2013 14:21
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sbiddle:
kornflake: moving toward to the fibre world, I wonder how many techs, won't correctly ID faulty sfp's.


A SFP is not used in UFB. It's only used if you're getting a glass only HSNS connection where Chorus don't supply the media converter or dark fibre where the end user supplies the electronics.





And If the SFPs that are used in UFB fail the whole splitter fails (there is one for every feed to cabinet/fat splitter on the PON cards) and can be easily diagnoised with an optical power meter - which feild techs have :-) )

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  # 958618 29-Dec-2013 15:28
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sbiddle:

A SFP is not used in UFB. It's only used if you're getting a glass only HSNS connection where Chorus don't supply the media converter or dark fibre where the end user supplies the electronics.



A SFP is used in the ONT (a GPON SFP) and in the OLT at the exchange.

If the OLT one goes dark, then 16 homes will lose service (could be upto 32 if chorus change how many subs they plan to put on a port/splitter).



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  # 958665 29-Dec-2013 17:03
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Sounddude:
If the OLT one goes dark, then 16 homes will lose service (could be upto 32 if chorus change how many subs they plan to put on a port/splitter).




My understanding is Chorus are moving from 24 -> 16 subs, not the other way.



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  # 958689 29-Dec-2013 17:25
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My understanding is Chorus are moving from 24 -> 16 subs, not the other way.


Yup, they would be silly to go more than 16 if they want to offer higher speeds. The GPON SFP's are 2.5Gig, so the more subs on the splitter, the higher the over subscription.



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