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BDFL - Memuneh
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Topic # 191884 19-Feb-2016 11:13
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Communications Minister Amy Adams has announced that the $31 million Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB) build in New Plymouth has been completed.

New Plymouth is the fourteenth urban area where UFB has been deployed, and the second in Taranaki after Hawera was completed in February 2015.

“Around 25,000 homes and businesses in New Plymouth can connect to UFB and by last Christmas around 14.4 per cent of those had connected,” Ms Adams says.

Twenty-six schools in New Plymouth are now able to connect to UFB. Nearly all of have either taken up a service with the Network for Learning, or are in the process of doing so.

“New Plymouth was one of the first places I visited to launch the build of UFB in April 2012, so it’s gratifying to be back less than four years later with the infrastructure fully in place and roaring into action.”

In addition to the $1.35 billion funding for the UFB initiative, a further $210 million has been set aside to extend UFB to another 200,000 New Zealanders.

“While celebrating New Plymouth’s build completion, I’m aware that the task of improving connectivity throughout Taranaki isn’t yet complete. Smaller rural centres and the region as a whole would like to see better broadband, and the Government is eager to deliver that where it’s feasible,” Ms Adams says.

The process for deciding the next UFB towns is underway, and progress is also being made to extend the Rural Broadband Initiative and set up a $50 million Mobile Blackspot Fund.

List of 14 completed UFB towns:
Whangarei, Te Awamutu, Oamaru, Cambridge, Tokoroa, Hawera, Ashburton, Blenheim, Whanganui, Taupō, Timaru, Greymouth, Masterton, New Plymouth

 

And from Ultrafast Fibre:

 


Ultrafast Fibre Limited has welcomed today’s announcement from Communications Minister, Amy Adams, that the Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB) network in New Plymouth has been completed.

Having begun work in New Plymouth just under four years ago, Ultrafast Fibre has deployed approximately 350km of fibre-optic network across the City.

“We are very proud to have completed building the fibre network here in New Plymouth,” says Ultrafast Fibre CEO, William Hamilton.

“With around 26,000 end users now able to connect and demand for UFB services growing, we look forward to seeing the truly innovative things that New Plymouth does with access to the new technology.”

Ultrafast Fibre can now add New Plymouth to its list of completed network builds, which includes Te Awamutu, Cambridge, Tokoroa, Whanganui and Hawera.

The Local Fibre Company is currently holding a two-day ‘Beyond Broadband’ Expo at TSB Showplace to celebrate the launch of the completed network.

“The ‘Beyond Broadband’ Expo allows locals to experience first-hand how amazing UFB is to use, and how they can get connected through their retail service provider,” says Mr Hamilton.

Mayor Andrew Judd says he is delighted the UFB build is complete and looks forward to the opportunities the technology will provide for New Plymouth.

"Our Council wants to encourage all the community to explore how they can make the most of our City’s access to Ultra-Fast Broadband,” says the Mayor.

“Having UFB will allow us to share more easily with the rest of the world the great things that we’re doing and achieving.”





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Talk DIrtY to me
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  Reply # 1495567 19-Feb-2016 11:58
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"The process for deciding the next UFB towns is underway, and progress is also being made to extend the Rural Broadband Initiative and set up a $50 million Mobile Blackspot Fund."

 

I assume that the next UFB towns (if Chorus should get the contracts) won't be started until the current work is complete in 2019?


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  Reply # 1495592 19-Feb-2016 12:21
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And that, folks, is why you want to be in an Ultra Fast Fibre area. I'd hope they get a decent set of UFB2 contracts.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1495805 19-Feb-2016 16:33
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Meanwhile, in Auckland...

 


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  Reply # 1495808 19-Feb-2016 16:41
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Lorenceo:

Meanwhile, in Auckland...




Wow that is like comparing a glider to Boeing 787 - 900

Few more streets / houses / buildings / Apartments in Auckland

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  Reply # 1495814 19-Feb-2016 16:56
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johnr:
Lorenceo:

 

Meanwhile, in Auckland...

 

 

 

 



Wow that is like comparing a glider to Boeing 787 - 900

Few more streets / houses / buildings / Apartments in Auckland

 

 

 

Well Yeah, except that ;

 

a) there hopefully are more people doing the work in Auckland

 

b) in terms of financial return Auckland vs NP no competition.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1495833 19-Feb-2016 18:16
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deadlyllama:

 

And that, folks, is why you want to be in an Ultra Fast Fibre area. I'd hope they get a decent set of UFB2 contracts.

 

 

Why?

 

They won the contract because they were the lines company in that area - if they were to expand beyond their area they'd face the exact same issues with access to poles that Chorus face when dealing with lines companies.

 

I was up in New Plymouth the other week and it's very interesting to see the architecture - because pretty much the entire network is all overhead (North Power in Northland are similar) deployment is a lot faster and easier than Chorus where the vast majority of the network is underground. Visually their network is incredibly ugly.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1495854 19-Feb-2016 18:28
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sbiddle:

 

They won the contract because they were the lines company in that area - if they were to expand beyond their area they'd face the exact same issues with access to poles that Chorus face when dealing with lines companies.

 

I was up in New Plymouth the other week and it's very interesting to see the architecture - because pretty much the entire network is all overhead (North Power in Northland are similar) deployment is a lot faster and easier than Chorus where the vast majority of the network is underground. Visually their network is incredibly ugly.

 

I'm pretty sure that Wanganui is the same. This Google Street view shows overhead cables strung. Is that black tube half way up the power pole a UFB component?


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  Reply # 1495855 19-Feb-2016 18:32
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Napier also has over head Cables @timh

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  Reply # 1495857 19-Feb-2016 18:34
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sbiddle:

 

 

 

I was up in New Plymouth the other week and it's very interesting to see the architecture - because pretty much the entire network is all overhead (North Power in Northland are similar) deployment is a lot faster and easier than Chorus where the vast majority of the network is underground. Visually their network is incredibly ugly.

 

 

 

 

 

bits that i have seen at least looked better than the Cable deployment...

 

 

 

im all for an overhead installation being cost effective, but if its done that way care needs to be taken to make it look appealing. nobody wants to see a ratsnets floating in the sky..





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  Reply # 1495858 19-Feb-2016 18:36
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sbiddle:

 

They won the contract because they were the lines company in that area - if they were to expand beyond their area they'd face the exact same issues with access to poles that Chorus face when dealing with lines companies.

 

I was up in New Plymouth the other week and it's very interesting to see the architecture - because pretty much the entire network is all overhead (North Power in Northland are similar) deployment is a lot faster and easier than Chorus where the vast majority of the network is underground. Visually their network is incredibly ugly.

 

 

I really dont care what it looks like, and IMO the people that object to it based on what it looks like are just selfish pricks.





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  Reply # 1495860 19-Feb-2016 18:42
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DarthKermit:

 

sbiddle:

 

They won the contract because they were the lines company in that area - if they were to expand beyond their area they'd face the exact same issues with access to poles that Chorus face when dealing with lines companies.

 

I was up in New Plymouth the other week and it's very interesting to see the architecture - because pretty much the entire network is all overhead (North Power in Northland are similar) deployment is a lot faster and easier than Chorus where the vast majority of the network is underground. Visually their network is incredibly ugly.

 

I'm pretty sure that Wanganui is the same. This Google Street view shows overhead cables strung. Is that black tube half way up the power pole a UFB component?

 

 

Yes. They simply put a FAT every 3-4 poles and when they sign up a customer they simply connect them to the nearest one because everything is overhead.

 

Chorus on the other hand have the vast majority of their network underground - even in areas where it's overhead leadins they still run all cable underground and simply put a small pillar on pretty much every pole they have access to - which aren't power poles because issues surrounding access to these poles is difficult when they're owned by the lines companies.




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  Reply # 1495861 19-Feb-2016 18:48
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We are lucky to be in a Chorus area with aerial drops - our install took all of 90 minutes from arrival on site to having it working...





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  Reply # 1495862 19-Feb-2016 18:50
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freitasm:

 

We are lucky to be in a Chorus area with aerial drops - our install took all of 90 minutes from arrival on site to having it working...

 

 

Once they have done your street, yeah. Thats the problem, they take forever to get the cables to the poles because of all the undergrounding. I would have been happy if in areas where there are other overground cables for power or whatever they just strung it up along side it. Would have been so much faster.





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  Reply # 1495872 19-Feb-2016 18:56
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richms:

 

freitasm:

 

We are lucky to be in a Chorus area with aerial drops - our install took all of 90 minutes from arrival on site to having it working...

 

 

Once they have done your street, yeah. Thats the problem, they take forever to get the cables to the poles because of all the undergrounding. I would have been happy if in areas where there are other overground cables for power or whatever they just strung it up along side it. Would have been so much faster.

 

 

Once again that goes back to pole access - it's easy when you're the lines company as you don't need to ask. Everybody else has to enter into agreements to use the poles.

 

It was suggested rather sarcastically to me last year when the HFC network was under review that they'd never be able to shut the network down because if they did all infrastructure has to be removed from the poles. I heard figures of between $50 - $100 million to do this in the Wellington region.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1495874 19-Feb-2016 19:00
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In Whakatane Chorus seems to have blanket permission to use the power poles; they came out to my place, scoped it, declared underground "too hard" and then installed it from the power pole the very next day (which included installing a box of some sort on the pole).

 

It was subsequently moved underground about six months later.


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