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Topic # 228702 18-Jan-2018 09:25
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Just released:

 

 

New figures released by Chorus have shed light on New Zealanders’ broadband habits, revealing the busiest day of the year for surfing the internet, as well as the cities using the most broadband data and enjoying the fastest speeds.

 

The busiest period of the year on the Chorus network was on 10 December at 9.25pm. During that time, 1.328 Terabits per second (Tbps) was being used on the Chorus network. This is the equivalent of about 260,000 HD video streams being watched simultaneously.

 

But only a handful of days into 2018 and the 2017 record has already been broken. On January 4 at 9:25pm, the Chorus network peaked at 1.330Tbps, as people streamed up a storm when the weather took a rough turn around many parts of the country.

 

Porirua claimed the title for the most data used in December, with the average household using about 202GB during the month, an increase of 34% on the same period in 2016. Auckland came in second place with 200GB, followed by Rotorua (182GB), Palmerston North (175GB) and Upper Hutt (175GB).

 

Overall, the average New Zealand household used 174GB of data in December on the Chorus network.

 

In terms of fast fixed-line broadband, not surprisingly, Dunedin was way out in front after making the most of winning Chorus’ Gigatown competition, with an average connection speed of 265Mbps. Rotorua (72Mbps), Wellington (70Mbps), Lower Hutt (68Mbps) and Porirua (68Mbps) rounded out the top five places in New Zealand with the fastest broadband on the Chorus network.

 

Nationwide, the average connection speed on Chorus’ network in December was 64Mpbs.

 

Chorus Network Strategy Manager Kurt Rodgers says the big growth drivers for data use in 2017 were video and smart devices. 

 

“People’s viewing habits have shifted online. It’s now very mainstream to watch television shows and movies via an app on a smart television or tablet,” he says.

 

“Many of 2017’s most popular television shows were online.  But it’s not just international providers like Netflix who are offering content online, domestic broadcasters TVNZ and Three both launched live streaming services in 2017.

 

“Smart televisions have also become mainstream.  You don’t need to be a IT geek to watch online television anymore – it’s all available from your television remote control.

 

“Smart phones are also increasingly being used to watch video, not just television but also social media and news; and most of this smart phone usage is via the home Wi-Fi network rather than the mobile network. 

 

“We might still call these things mobile phones but their primary use these days is as a Wi-Fi-connected screen rather than as a telephone.”

 

These trends will continue to contribute towards strong data usage growth through 2018 and beyond, he says.

 

“2018 will be the year that smart home devices become mainstream, enabled by new generation Wi-Fi mesh systems, smart speakers and personal assistants.

 

“Wi-Fi mesh systems are easy to use and provide fantastic performance.  Based on 5G Wi-Fi technology, these new home systems will boost speeds throughput the home, removing Wi-Fi dead spots and enabling even more smart devices to connect to the internet.

 

“Smart speakers and home assistants make it easy to control everything in your digital home from your Spotify music to your smart light bulbs.”

 

Mr Rodgers says the data explosion shows why Kiwis should take up a fibre or VDSL fixed line broadband connection which offer dedicated capacity and the option of an unlimited data plan.

 

“To ensure a superb experience on the Chorus network, whatever the time of day, we manage capacity to keep the network congestion free. It’s like being able to add another lane to a motorway before it starts to congest.”

 

Chorus network statistics for 2017

 

 





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'That VDSL Cat'
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  Reply # 1941864 18-Jan-2018 09:56
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Surprised the likes of auckland rated so high being it covers a lot of non-fibre land.





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  Reply # 1941905 18-Jan-2018 11:01
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I would say that Auckland population density has a big part to play on both the data usage figure and speed figure. I'm surprised that Dunedin, the original Gigatown, is not in the top 10 of the data usage list, though. ^mike


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1941934 18-Jan-2018 11:43
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*cancels all plans to open a chain of video stores*


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  Reply # 1941939 18-Jan-2018 11:52
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I fell I've done my bit to help these figures.... I work in Porirua (1st) and live in Upper Hutt (5th)....





 

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  Reply # 1941949 18-Jan-2018 11:58
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im doing my bit for Rotorua , nearly 2 TB a month  used .


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Reply # 1941960 18-Jan-2018 12:05
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Is there a description of how Chorus measures the quantities of bits per second at a given time or Bytes transferred by its network over a given period? I have seen these numbers used everywhere from commercial advertising to Commerce Commission reporting, but never the procedures used or assumptions made in generating them.

 

Thanks, Alan


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  Reply # 1941972 18-Jan-2018 12:35
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acjh58:

 

Is there a description of how Chorus measures the quantities of bits per second at a given time or Bytes transferred by its network over a given period? I have seen these numbers used everywhere from commercial advertising to Commerce Commission reporting, but never the procedures used or assumptions made in generating them.

 

Thanks, Alan

 

 

 

 

Normally throughput over 15min period is the "industry standard" back from ATM days..





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  Reply # 1942019 18-Jan-2018 14:07
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Throughput from the ATM days was relatively easy, from memory, and usually referred to a simple point-to-point link or set of links rather than a diverse nationwide network (which I assume the Chorus stats refer to). To generate a national peak number such as 1.328 Terabits per second over the busiest period must require some form of summation of data from a range of measurement points (to capture info from localised content delivery etc)??  The reason I ask is that I'm not sure how I would do that, and what I can now reasonably conclude from the reported numbers (or trends in those numbers). I'm also curious about the reported average monthly usage per household in GB, specifically what network measurements are used to generate these reports.

 

Thanks for any help/comment, Alan


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  Reply # 1942041 18-Jan-2018 15:16
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I'd imagine they'd be going off hand over link utilisation.

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  Reply # 1942052 18-Jan-2018 15:39
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We collect traffic stats from every link in our copper and fibre aggregation network every 5 minutes.  We do this as part of our capacity planning process so that we can maintain a congestion free network.  

 

We use big data tools to analyse and report the key metrics. 

 

  • The peak throughput metric is the total volume of traffic in the busiest 5 minute period divided by 300 (number of seconds in that 5 minute period).  Total volume is simply the sum of the all the traffic on the DSLAM and OLT backhaul links (i.e. the Ethernet Fibre link between our Copper or Fibre access nodes and aggregation switches).
  • Average monthly data usage is the sum of all traffic volume measurements over the course of a calendar month divided by the number of copper and fibre broadband customers.  ^Jon

 


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  Reply # 1942097 18-Jan-2018 16:51
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Chorusnz:

 

We collect traffic stats from every link in our copper and fibre aggregation network every 5 minutes.  We do this as part of our capacity planning process so that we can maintain a congestion free network.  

 

 

I shall require a link to your live network weathermap to verify that claim 


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  Reply # 1942098 18-Jan-2018 16:52
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Thanks for that Jon.

 

So the peak is a sum (averaged over a 5 min period) of traffic on links between all access nodes (fibre and copper) and the Chorus aggregation switches (which I assume includes traffic from ISP's business customers, schools etc as well as domestic end users). 

 

The GB per household measure is therefore the total traffic on aggregation links, over a month - reported by city, divided by the number of individual Chorus fibre and copper terminations in the city? That makes sense, but I'm not sure how the traffic volumes are converted into a GB figure (I can think of a few ways of doing this) and whether this a per domestic household or a per Chorus network termination point measure. The reasons why this is potentially important are:

 

- Readers might compare these figures to domestic data caps - which are set/measured by ISPs

 

- Household usage may be different (higher) than these averages if, for example, high usage video streaming services are principally domestic customers

 

Once again, any comment greatly appreciated. Alan


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  Reply # 1942134 18-Jan-2018 19:33
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hio77:

Surprised the likes of auckland rated so high being it covers a lot of non-fibre land.



High house prices meaning average household size will be larger. And Spark moving a lot of their lower usage customers to fixed wireless connections.





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  Reply # 1942153 18-Jan-2018 20:28
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The numbers seem about right based on some numbers I have seen. I would guesstimate the daily usage for the whole country would be around 7PB a day where Saturday is the busiest day vs the peak at 9pm on Sunday.





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  Reply # 1942193 18-Jan-2018 21:56
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Being based (near) Porirua I feel I play a big part in those graphs with my network use...

 

It is about to get a lot bigger given I've now got a physical server to mirror to Backblaze.





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