Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


KiwiTim

343 posts

Ultimate Geek


#116372 27-Apr-2013 08:35
Send private message

Hi,

I've got a few questions about using wireless repeaters / range extenders.

My brother lives in a two storey house in Sydney. He has TPG naked ADSL2+ broadband, which came with a NetComm NB6Plus4W modem/router. The router is located on the 2nd floor. He gets very poor wifi on the ground floor.

He has an old Netgear DG834G router that we would like to use as a wireless repeater.

The primary IP address (homepage of the router) of the NetComm router is 192.168.1.1

The primary IP address of the Netgear router is 192.168.0.1

So NetComm has a subnet of "1"
and Neatgear has a subnet of "0"

I would like to change the subnet of the Netgear router to match that of the NetComm, but it will not let me.

I am attempting to follow the instructions given here for using wireless repeaters:
http://vpncasestudy.com/download/WDS/WDS_Concept.pdf

However, with just one wireless repeater being used rather than two as indicated in the above PDF.

Obviously, since I cannot get the above devices to use the same subnet, I cannot navigate to the Netgear homepage of 192.168.0.1.

Do I need to use routers of the same brand and model to extend my brother's wifi, or will the above two devices do it for me?

Can I enable WPA2 between these two routers (they both support it individually)?

Would we be better off just to buy one adsl2+ modem/router with a much more powerful wifi signal (any suggestions)?

Many thanks,

Tim

Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer Create new topic
timmmay
16377 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #806233 27-Apr-2013 08:57
Send private message

You're trying to amplify a weak signal, that's not ideal. If you can run a cable to the second AP do that. It's more reliable, and faster. There are guides on the dd-wrt website, but you have to do things like turn off DHCP. I have two wap/routers, different brands, on different SSID's. They don't roam, but I switch between them easily enough.

sbiddle
29208 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #806244 27-Apr-2013 09:15
Send private message

My response to this is the same as it is to the same question when it pops up here at least once a month.

Forget it. You're literally wasting your time trying to do what you're trying to do.

If you want peformance you need to run Ethernet cable to the 2nd floor where you can then position an AP on the ground floor. If you can't get Ethernet cable to the 2nd floor your best option is power over Ethernet extenders and then an AP. Set the SSID and security the same on both devices but use different WiFi channels (remembering only 1, 6 and 11 are the only 3 usable channels that don't overlap) and you can roam between the two floors.

WDS halves the total bandwidth meaning your performance will suffer. Your concept is also flawed because as mentioned above you're trying to improve WiFi coverage by placing a device to boost a signal in an area that has a bad signal, something that just can't work well.




 
 
 
 


KiwiTim

343 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #806399 27-Apr-2013 16:32
Send private message

Thanks for your suggestions. I think it is a better solution to have an ethernet cable from the NetComm to the Netgear, but this may not be physically possible.

Regardless of whether I connect these two routers by ethernet cable or wifi, I have the issue of each of them having different subnets.

I don't know much about networking, but I think that this would prevent them from linking/communicating because they are using different subnets, and I am unable to change the Netgear subnet from 0 to 1, to match that of the NetComm router.

The trouble is I cannot navigate to the Netgear router's home page at 192.168.0.1 from the network when connected to the Netcomm. Does this mean that I would need to use 2nd router that has a "1" subnet to let them talk?

grant_k
3539 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #806406 27-Apr-2013 17:19
Send private message

KiwiTim: I don't know much about networking, but I think that this would prevent them from linking/communicating because they are using different subnets, and I am unable to change the Netgear subnet from 0 to 1, to match that of the NetComm router.

The trouble is I cannot navigate to the Netgear router's home page at 192.168.0.1 from the network when connected to the Netcomm. Does this mean that I would need to use 2nd router that has a "1" subnet to let them talk?

Maybe I'm missing something obvious here but:

  • If you can't change the Netgear to match the Netcomm, why don't you change the Netcomm to match the Netgear?
  • Meaning that you will end up with both routers on the same subnet 192.168.0.x
  • After all, it doesn't matter which subnet the routers are on, so long as it's the same one!


There is nothing cast in stone which says that your router needs to be on 192.168.1.x although it is a common choice for consumer-grade routers.





sbiddle
29208 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #806433 27-Apr-2013 18:21
Send private message

WDS isn't always compatible between vendors either.

Cut your losses and buy a pair of power over Ethernet adapters and a cheap $40 TP-Link Access Point. Using a router in place of an AP could also makes things complicated, particularly if you want to use WDS.

In all honesty even if you get your setup working you're still going to end up with a terrible solution.



raytaylor
3461 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #806462 27-Apr-2013 19:28
Send private message

So to be clear

1) Your router down stairs runs the DHCP server and has the ip address of 192.168.0.1
    It issues DHCP addresses from 192.168.0.10-192.168.0.49
   subnet mask is always 255.255.255.0

2) A lan cable runs between port 1 on the back of the master router, to an Ethernet Over Power adapter. TP-Link make some good ones.

3) Upstairs, another Ethernet Over Power adapter is plugged into the wall. A Lan cable runs from that to a LAN port on the back of the slave router which will have its routing functions switched off.
The ethernet over power adapters can run at 50-100mbps easily in most houses and are much easier to install than cat5 cable.

4) To make the slave router a plain access point, switch off DHCP or DHCP Server on the LAN interface - leave the internet/WAN/DSL interface as is.
Also change its LAN ip address to 192.168.0.2 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0
Because the DHCP is switched off on the second router, it just acts as a bridge. No computers will try to use its wan interface to get online, they will go through the wan interface of the router downstairs.

5) Now the wireless.
inside 192.168.0.1
 - SSID or network name = YourSurnameWifi eg. TaylorFamilyWifi
 - Channel = 1 (not auto)
 - WPS = disabled or switched off
 - Security = WPA/WPA2 PSK
 - Security Type = TKIP or TKIP+AES Auto
 - Passphrase or key = any wifi password of your choosing at least 8 characters long.

inside 192.168.0.2
 - Eact same settings above except use channel 6 or channel 11
If you cannot match the same settings, use WPA-PSK + TKIP only and do the same in the master router.

With the same settings in each router, the laptop will roam to whichever AP it gets the best signal from.
When it talks to the upstairs router, it joins back up through the LAN ethernet cable, over the powerline, into the downstairs router as if it was never disconnected from the downstairs router.

With the same SSID / network name and passwords you can almost seamlessly roam. if you have different wireless security settings on each router, you will not be able to roam and have problems.












Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




KiwiTim

343 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #806603 28-Apr-2013 08:53
Send private message

Thanks folks,

So the routers have to definitely be on the same subnet. Good to have that point clearly established.

Powerline network adapters: I had never heard of them before today. What a great idea; no need to lay cable.

Thanks again for the excellent responses.

Tim

Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer Create new topic




News »

Logitech introduce MX Anywhere 3
Posted 21-Sep-2020 21:17


Countdown unveils contactless shopping with new Scan&Go tech
Posted 21-Sep-2020 09:48


HP unveils new innovations for businesses adapting to rapidly evolving workstyles and workforces
Posted 17-Sep-2020 15:36


GoPro launches new HERO9 Black camera
Posted 17-Sep-2020 09:45


Telecommunications industry launches new 5G Facts website
Posted 17-Sep-2020 07:56


New Zealand ranks 3rd in world in GSMA index
Posted 15-Sep-2020 10:13


Trend Micro Security Suite adds web monitoring to prevent identity theft
Posted 14-Sep-2020 15:37


NVIDIA to acquire Arm for US$ 40 billion
Posted 14-Sep-2020 12:27


Epson launches its next gen A3+ colour EcoTank multi-function printer
Posted 10-Sep-2020 16:08


Sony launches three new native 4K SXRD home cinema projectors
Posted 9-Sep-2020 18:00


Catalyst Cloud brings Kubernetes-based open-source web hosting solution to market
Posted 9-Sep-2020 17:54


Verizon Connect eyes further growth in New Zealand
Posted 8-Sep-2020 09:26


PNY launches XLR8 gaming NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 series powered by the all-new NVIDIA Ampere architecture
Posted 3-Sep-2020 16:39


NVIDIA delivers greatest-ever generational leap with GeForce RTX 30 Series GPUs
Posted 3-Sep-2020 16:17


Weta Digital advances visual effects and animation in the cloud with AWS
Posted 2-Sep-2020 17:09



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.