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Kingy

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#157118 20-Nov-2014 14:02
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I'm going to spend the weekend cleaning/removing dust etc from my PC.

My plan is basically going to be to take it all apart, give the case and fans a good wipe down, clean and re-apply thermal paste to the CPU and GPU. Just give everything a clean.

What I'm wanting to know is how does everyone here deal with dust? Specifically I have dust on the top of my gfx card (exposed component board), motherboard and in the CPU cooler. I'm guessing to get the dust out of the CPU cooler I could just buy some compressed air and blow it out/take to it with the vacuum cleaner but what about on top of the component boards? blow it off? wipe it off etc




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MikeB4
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  #1180132 20-Nov-2014 14:06
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Vacuum cleaners can create a static charge I never use these. Tinned air is OK but be very careful, use in short bursts and allow to sit as they can produce a lot of water vapour and freeze the surfaces sprayed. If you know anyone with a modelers compressor and air gun 
they are very good. Also careful use of Isopropyl Alcohol is useful to remove stubborn but again use with care.  

It is also a good idea to use a static strap or static pad when doing this.

xpd

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  #1180141 20-Nov-2014 14:17
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KiwiNZ: Vacuum cleaners can create a static charge I never use these. Tinned air is OK but be very careful, use in short bursts and allow to sit as they can produce a lot of water vapour and freeze the surfaces sprayed. If you know anyone with a modelers compressor and air gun 
they are very good. Also careful use of Isopropyl Alcohol is useful to remove stubborn but again use with care.  

It is also a good idea to use a static strap or static pad when doing this.


Yup, avoid the vacuum on mainboard etc....    and highly recommend the compressor and airgun - had a proper compressor at previous job and just used that for blowing out the PC's, tooks couple of mins to get everything out :)





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hio77
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  #1180177 20-Nov-2014 15:01
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compressor if you have one is definitely your best option.

dont bother with compressed air cans... they are more of a frustration than a use.


Earbud cleaners also can be pretty handy if you wanna get in there with something small..






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Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


Dynamic
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  #1180182 20-Nov-2014 15:15
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Aside from giving the thing a bit of a squirt to get rid of any dust clogging the heat sink.....

IF IT'S NOT BROKEN DON'T FIX IT




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Kingy

395 posts

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  #1180183 20-Nov-2014 15:19
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Well there is 2 reasons I'm doing it. I was playing a game the other night and after half hour or so the graphics started to do the whole artifacts thing on the screen. Secondly i'm moving overseas in a month to a far hotter country than this so if it is a heat thing i'm going to do everything I can to make sure it's not going to die on me :)




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JWR

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  #1180186 20-Nov-2014 15:26

Kingy: I'm going to spend the weekend cleaning/removing dust etc from my PC.

My plan is basically going to be to take it all apart, give the case and fans a good wipe down, clean and re-apply thermal paste to the CPU and GPU. Just give everything a clean.

What I'm wanting to know is how does everyone here deal with dust? Specifically I have dust on the top of my gfx card (exposed component board), motherboard and in the CPU cooler. I'm guessing to get the dust out of the CPU cooler I could just buy some compressed air and blow it out/take to it with the vacuum cleaner but what about on top of the component boards? blow it off? wipe it off etc


I have a PC to clean too.

I think I will buy a small compressor from the likes of Supercheap Auto, Bunnings etc.. for about $100. It seems a better option than buying ridiculously expensive cans of air that probably don't last very long and I can use the compressor for other things.

Definitely, don't use a vacuum cleaner anywhere near the inside of a PC. Too much of a static risk.

I would also stay away from cloths for the same reason. Definitely don't use any sort of wet cloth. You don't want residue left behind.

You can buy small anti-static hand brushes. They might be useful in some situations.

Be careful of spinning any of the case or gpu/cpu fans with compressed air. Apparently, you can burn out the fans.

Isopropyl alcohol seems to work cleaning away any CPU thermal paste. Generally, I would remove the CPU for cleaning, unless I am feeling like taking a risk.

If in the (unlikely) event Isopropyl alchol doesn't work hen you will probably need acetone. Acetone is really dodgy stuff. It will dissolve just about anything in your PC except metal. However, I have only ever found it necessary for some GPU thermal compounds.

If you are removing your CPU heatsink, then it can be a good idea to run your PC beforehand to heat it up a bit. That softens the thermal compound and makes it easier to remove the heatsink.

raytaylor
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  #1180230 20-Nov-2014 17:26
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Just take it down to your local IT shop. It literally takes them less than 60 seconds to open up the case and blow it out with their air compressor.
Offer them $5 or something and buy the silver cpu paste from them.

People that say dont bother are wong.
As dust settles on components, they run hotter, causing a lower total life span.
Regularly blowing out the dust from inside computers (and laptops) will extend their life.

One of my jobs as a small business technician at my old IT job was going around every 6 months with the air compressor in the car, visiting each customer and blowing out the dust of their computers in their car parks.

It was a good way to drum up some business with small to medium size business customers that we hadnt had any billings for the last 6 months - we would offer a free clean out as a way to talk to them - if they were between other paying / service contract customer blowouts and were flexible on time.




Ray Taylor
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alexvdl
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  #1182194 24-Nov-2014 15:17
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Dust has never been a major issue for me, I always build open plan PCs and they are very easy to manage. I always completely unplug the machine from it's power source and use a soft paintbrush over all surfaces. Once the dust settles at the bottom of the case I use a vacuum cleaner to pull the dust out of the bottom of the case. I've never had an issue and this method has always worked well for me :)

raytaylor
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  #1182298 24-Nov-2014 18:34
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You should leave the PC plugged in but switched off at the wall.
This keeps the chassis grounded to prevent static electricity build up




Ray Taylor
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hio77
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  #1182300 24-Nov-2014 18:36
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raytaylor: You should leave the PC plugged in but switched off at the wall.
This keeps the chassis grounded to prevent static electricity build up


interesting argument, i personally have always pulled power out rather than switching it off at the wall and leaving it grounded..

Ironic that this thread pops up though!


just sat down from helping a family member who somehow decided her computer needed to eat a bag of chips >.>




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


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