Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


155 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 5


Topic # 224326 13-Nov-2017 10:15
Send private message

I was wondering what i7 CPU would be recommended for use with dedicated CAD software (including, but not necessarily limited to, ArchiCAD and Artlantis). I'm looking at an 8 core, unless that's considered under/overkill?!

 

 

 

Any advice would be gratefully received.


Create new topic
Mad Scientist
18913 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2457

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1900058 13-Nov-2017 10:25
2 people support this post
Send private message

I'd check out AMD Ryzen's 8-16 cores too if i were in your shoes.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper I think they're called.



155 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 1900061 13-Nov-2017 10:27
Send private message

Thanks for the tip. Is your advice based around cost, or other technical specs? (I've not worked with AMD CPUs before)


Mad Scientist
18913 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2457

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1900062 13-Nov-2017 10:29
3 people support this post
Send private message

Based on the crushing performance of the Ryzen Threadrippers. No idea about cost. But they are very power hungry for obvious reasons.



155 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 1900065 13-Nov-2017 10:32
Send private message

Many thanks.  :)


182 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 31

Trusted

  Reply # 1900070 13-Nov-2017 10:37
One person supports this post
Send private message

I haven't spent time with ArchiCAD or Artlantis, I spend most of my time between Solidworks and Autodesk for both CAD and CAM work.

 

I haven't upgraded for a while, but the CPU my quad core i5 doesn't struggle with the CAD or CAM operations. I've found that running both the Applications and projects from a decent SSD and having plenty of RAM helps the most. In addition to these, the video card choice can make the biggest difference and can massively impact things like rendering and post processing times. Simulating a CAM milling operation will often push my GPU harder than many games due to the number of polygons and the accuracy these programs aim for.

 

 




155 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 1900071 13-Nov-2017 10:39
Send private message

Thanks very much for your input. I'm looking at least 16Gb RAM, and definitely an SSD for the OS and software. GPU-wise, I was considering a nVidia Quadro P1000 - any thoughts on that?


182 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 31

Trusted

  Reply # 1900077 13-Nov-2017 10:46
One person supports this post
Send private message

I haven't had the chance to play with the later Quadro cards, but they have always been reliable, I used to use them for significant GIS work and they never had much trouble keeping up.

 

ArchiCAD actually has a good write up on the site. it looks like the P1000 only starts to have trouble once you hit the really large polygon counts - https://helpcenter.graphisoft.com/technotes/video-cards/recommended-video-cards-for-archicad-21/ .Looks to be a memory constraint first as the lower memory cards  drop off the quickest.


1019 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 572
Inactive user


  Reply # 1900078 13-Nov-2017 10:50
Send private message

As above: GPU is far more important than CPU. Check the software manufacturer recommendations - I imagine it'll be OpenGL 2.0+ and project size dependant.


211 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 33

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1900102 13-Nov-2017 11:05
One person supports this post
Send private message

At work we found digging into user forums provided good information.

 

We have had problems with workstations and graphics cards for some autodesk software, with locally built PCs.

 

We tried the vendor recommended and Autodesk certified HP Z440 workstation with Xeon E5 16 GB Ram, Nvidia K4200 graphics, fitted an SSD and had some issues and marginally improved performance, over previous PC. And the cost of the HP was not justified, still had a motherboard failure and some other issues. 

 

The break through for us was to find the main component of software as part of a infrastructure design suite a few of us use, Civil 3D will only use a single core, so the core speed is critical not the number of cores or threads. Sure some of the other rendering stuff runs really well, but not the bread and butter every day component.  

 

Current workstations are i7 4.20 Ghz, 16 GB Ram and graphics Nvidia M2000 4GB and a good SSD.





:)


1405 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 369


  Reply # 1900113 13-Nov-2017 11:26
One person supports this post
Send private message

Sounds like you really want an i7 7820X (Anandtech Review)

 

Alternatively the Ryzen 1700, 1800 or 1900 are alright, but not quite in the same ballpark. The i7 is a bit more expensive, but not too bad for business value, and way cheaper than last years 8 core CPU's.




155 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 1900167 13-Nov-2017 12:33
Send private message

Thanks to all for the tips and advice!


79 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 4


  Reply # 1901060 15-Nov-2017 07:50
One person supports this post
Send private message

Hi

 

I use archicad every day for work.

 

I have found that quad core I7 are fine as a processor, because it is not just the processor that matters, you need a good video card, a nivida 1070 or 1080 & a good ssd + lots of fast ram, 16gig min, but 32 would be better.

 

my 2 cents.

 

Greg


Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.