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Topic # 145453 18-May-2014 18:16
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We just bought a new house.  Keen to have comments on my plans for data networking.

The house is four years old, about 200m2 two levels: with living, office and master bed on upper level; kid/guest bedrooms and garage on lower.  The upper floor is timber.

Phone outlets in master bed, office and kitchen. Satellite (no UHF coverage) via coax to all bedrooms.  4 years old and they didn't fit any network cables :facepalm:.

Our collective current and future uses of the network include: media streaming, web surfing, gaming downstairs only (including multi-player online gaming).  We will gradually build a Sonos network.

I can get Cat 6 cables run down the internal walls on the upper levels, by a guy I have used before who does a good job.  It will be slow work, so my thinking is run the fewest number of cables and install switches. 

A switch costs about $40, as does an hour of labour.  I also think it will be easier to have clusters of devices connect into a switch than have say 6 cables into a wall plate.  But hey I'm new at this so my assumptions maybe wrong. I'm thinking the following: -

Office (middle of upper level): -
- Modem into existing phone outlet
- 2 x RJ45 wallplate
A) Cat 6 to lounge
B) Cat 6 to master bed
- Gigabit Wifi router (4 port)
1) NAS
2) Gigabit switch (5 port)
   i) Sonos unit
   ii) Printer/Scanner
   iii) Dyna dock
   iv) Spare
   v) router
3) To wall plate A
4) To wall plate B

Lounge: -
- 1 x RJ45 wall plate
- 8 port gigabit switch
1) Samsung 'Smart' BD player
2) DVB-S reciever
4) Onkyo 2 zone network receiver
5) Future Smart TV
6) Future HTPC
7) Spare
8) To wall plate

Bedroom: -
1 x RJ45 wall plate
- 5 Port gigabit switch
1) Sonos Unit
2) BD Player
3) Smart TV
4) DVB-S decoder
5) Spare
6) To wall plate

The bottom level will have to make do with WiFi.  I think the signal will be OK through the floor.  but I can install a wi-fi repeater if I have too.











Mike

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  Reply # 1047580 18-May-2014 19:14
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You would not regret running additional cables to any room, and it costs relatively little to run an extra cable.  They will be used (if in the right place).  Having switches dotted around is an extra thing to power and extra clutter.

To save $ you can terminate the cables yourself.  It's not hard and I'm sure there will be YouTube tutorials galore.  You can leave long tails on the cable and tuck these into the wall (so if you mess up the termination you can chop and start again).

Tiny patch panel for the central location if you do decide to run more cables:  http://www.dynamix.co.nz/index.html (search for pp-mini)

At the end of the day it's your house and your budget and time.




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  Reply # 1047585 18-May-2014 19:23
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Running a single Cat6 cable to each location will be fine using a gigabit switch at each location for what will be connected to it, just purchase a really good router like the MikroTik RB750GL.

We are also suppliers of the Sonos range, if you would like a GeekZone price of any unit, PM us and we will certainly look after you.




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  Reply # 1047587 18-May-2014 19:28
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Dynamic: You would not regret running additional cables to any room, and it costs relatively little to run an extra cable.  They will be used (if in the right place).  Having switches dotted around is an extra thing to power and extra clutter.

To save $ you can terminate the cables yourself.  It's not hard and I'm sure there will be YouTube tutorials galore.  You can leave long tails on the cable and tuck these into the wall (so if you mess up the termination you can chop and start again).

Tiny patch panel for the central location if you do decide to run more cables:  http://www.dynamix.co.nz/index.html (search for pp-mini)

At the end of the day it's your house and your budget and time.


interested in this myself (about to build) what is the real world difference between the Cat6 and Cat5e versions of this.... AFAIK it's the routing and termination that 'make' Cat6, and the panels seem exactly the same?

is there something 'special' about the Cat6 one, or some special way I'll need to route the cable to make it effective anyway?

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  Reply # 1047597 18-May-2014 19:40
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PhantomNVD: interested in this myself (about to build) what is the real world difference between the Cat6 and Cat5e versions of this.... AFAIK it's the routing and termination that 'make' Cat6, and the panels seem exactly the same?

is there something 'special' about the Cat6 one, or some special way I'll need to route the cable to make it effective anyway?


http://www.diffen.com/difference/Cat5e_vs_Cat6

At a casual glance, the cables and panels look the same.

Well terminated Cat5 will do Gigabit speeds just fine.  Cat6 is to support 10G and faster in the future - potentially required by the successor to 4K TVs for example.  Cables pairs are separated more carefully to prevent crosstalk made more likely by the higher frequencies involved, and sharp kinks are more likely to cause signal loss if I understand correctly.




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  Reply # 1047616 18-May-2014 20:17
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Any prospect of running conduit to those locations? If so, you can put nylon fishing line inside to pull cables through, and terminate with a face-place at each location. Then if you decide you need more connections, or want to run a different type of cable etc, you can easily just pull the new cables through and swap the face plate.

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  Reply # 1047635 18-May-2014 21:31
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we built 5 years ago - ran cat5 to most rooms and terminated them at a 7 way plate in the study wardrobe which houses the router, 8 port gigaswitch, unraid server and now master splitter for vdsl

so house is more or less fully cabled up

has worked well for last 5 years and when we have needed more lan ports because of multiple wired devices and/or wifi AP's eg. lounge and also family room - i have just thrown a giga switch or old router in and daisy chained off these - cheap and does the job with no throughput issues that i have noticed

not as tidy as 2 or 3 discrete cables + terminals - but that would be dearer then a switch i believe?

and in one location i now need 5 lan ports (xbox360/tv/freeviewbox/bluray/htpc) - and i would NEVER have run this many discrete cables (and it will likely end up being 7 soon with av receiver and xbone)

and finally, the clutter is hidden behind the av cabinet(s), so no one will ever see it



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  Reply # 1047646 18-May-2014 22:11
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OK so if I go for a patch panel I install a heap of RJ-45 jacks and run a cat 6 cable from each jack back to the patch panel.  In the lounge that would require 8 jacks so I'm guessing what 2 or 3 wall plates?

?The patch panel has a WAN port to connect to the modem?

?I connect the WAN port on my wifi-router to the patch panel?




Mike

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  Reply # 1047647 18-May-2014 22:29
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MikeAqua: OK so if I go for a patch panel I install a heap of RJ-45 jacks and run a cat 6 cable from each jack back to the patch panel.  In the lounge that would require 8 jacks so I'm guessing what 2 or 3 wall plates?

?The patch panel has a WAN port to connect to the modem?

?I connect the WAN port on my wifi-router to the patch panel?


Patch panel NOT = router/switch

you'll still need a router/switch with enough ports for all connected cables...

A patch panel is just a set of 'wall plate' terminal endings for all those wires in one space, you'll still need to link them to a switch which will then handle their networking together.

WAN port from router goes out to the world via the ISP, you just link the switch to the LAN port of the router, and it'll link ALL the other wires to (and through) the router.


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  Reply # 1047648 18-May-2014 22:33
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looks something like this: http://www.lanshack.com/images/Category_Images/pp-app1.jpg

b
asically it just ends all the wires, then you link the ones that are in use to the switch, which links to thr ISP router and voila!

(note: ISP routers often have 4-8 'switching' LAN ports too )

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  Reply # 1047706 19-May-2014 05:41
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MikeAqua: OK so if I go for a patch panel I install a heap of RJ-45 jacks and run a cat 6 cable from each jack back to the patch panel.  In the lounge that would require 8 jacks so I'm guessing what 2 or 3 wall plates?

?The patch panel has a WAN port to connect to the modem?

?I connect the WAN port on my wifi-router to the patch panel?


would it not make more sense to run 1 cable to the lounge and then have an 8 port switch down there so you could connect all your equipment to that? less wires needing to run in the wall and almost as tidy

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  Reply # 1047886 19-May-2014 10:54
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driller2000: we built 5 years ago - ran cat5 to most rooms and terminated them at a 7 way plate in the study wardrobe which houses the router, 8 port gigaswitch, unraid server and now master splitter for vdsl

so house is more or less fully cabled up

has worked well for last 5 years and when we have needed more lan ports because of multiple wired devices and/or wifi AP's eg. lounge and also family room - i have just thrown a giga switch or old router in and daisy chained off these - cheap and does the job with no throughput issues that i have noticed

not as tidy as 2 or 3 discrete cables + terminals - but that would be dearer then a switch i believe?

and in one location i now need 5 lan ports (xbox360/tv/freeviewbox/bluray/htpc) - and i would NEVER have run this many discrete cables (and it will likely end up being 7 soon with av receiver and xbone)

and finally, the clutter is hidden behind the av cabinet(s), so no one will ever see it


^^ like he (and others) have said, definitely the best/cheapest way to retrofit like you're planning to do.

Maybe just ensure you use cat6, as this will scale to 10Gb at some future point, and thus you could use a switch (later capable 10Gb) to share this "10Gb" wire with up to 10 different devices running 1Gb each :)



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  Reply # 1047922 19-May-2014 11:43
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Patch panel NOT = router/switch



Thanks for the clarification.   I know what you mean now.  I have one in my office at work. It's handy for connecting various devices to separate services e.g. phone/data but I don't see the benefit of a patch panel for what I am doing? 

To be clear about the gear I have: -

Netgear WNDR3700 'wifi router'
Netgear DM111P 'broadband modem'

So my plan is now to: -

 

  • Install a gigabit switch at each device cluster (I can hide these tidily).
  • Run a couple of CAT 6 cables from the WNDR3700 to each cluster.
  • Use WiFi elsewhere, including a repeater if necessary.
I'm also going to investigate using the coax cable to Mr Gamer's room for ethernet instead of DVB-S.  I know you can get adapters for ethernet over coax, so if I can get CAT6 and power to where ever the DVB-S splitter is located that may be an option.






Mike

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