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42 posts

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#233728 30-Apr-2018 12:13
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Greetings

 

I am currently looking at a couple different solutions for a WIFI network at home.

 

I have a Netgear Nighthawk R8000, Does a fine job apart from 2 corners of the house. So I want to upgrade it go to a WIFI mesh setup with a total of 3 APs with an Ethernet Backhaul.

 

Where my Fibre connection comes in is one corner of the house and the 5GHz band just reaches the corner I have the office, It is fine under the 2.4GHz band. The other location is out in the Garage where we have a deck outside again the 2.4GHz is fine but 5GHz can be patchy.

 

Main reason for the upgrade is there is a lot of development going on with Neighbours and Im thinking more 2.4GHz products coming I do not want to have issues.

 

I have been looking at the Netgear Orbi (RBK50 plus the RBS40), Linksys and the TP link models as well.

 

In each case of the 3 using an ethernet backhaul requires you to change from a Mesh style setup to using them as APs so basically have 3 WIFI networks.

 

I do want to be able to have a single WIFI network and have it roaming (I do not mind slipping the 2.4 and 5 into 2 separate Networks with NETWORKNAME and NETWORKNAME-5)

 

Has anyone set up  Mesh WIFI network with Ethernet Backhaul with either the above products?

 

Or do you think it will be better to go to the Ubiquiti UniFi UAP-AC-PRO/Ubiquiti UniFi UAP-AC-LITE route with 3 APs with them.

 

Ideally, I do not want to screw anything in to walls, Just sit on top of Cabinets

 

 

 

Thanks


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  #2005106 30-Apr-2018 13:06
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a mesh network uses wifi as the back haul, thats the principle of it. if it used an Ethernet cable as the back haul its no longer a mesh setup.

 

you want 3 separate access points which connect via ethernet. you might even get away with 2 of them. space them more centrally in your house so they cover it all. can you run cables to where you need to?

 

 


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  #2005129 30-Apr-2018 13:30
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Why do you need ethernet backhaul? I have Google WiFi in my house which uses a separate 5GHz channel for backhaul, never had any speed issues plus its always going to be limited by your device to AP speed anyway I would have thought.





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  #2005134 30-Apr-2018 13:40
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Thanks Guys

 

Main reason why I was wanting the Ethernet Backhaul was in the 2 areas I was wanting the units the 5GHz can get a bit patchy.

 

I can always try first and roll to the Ethernet Backhaul if need to right?

 

 


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  #2005195 30-Apr-2018 14:15
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the purpose of the mesh system is that the coverage overlaps, so think of it like the olympic rings, each overage area overlaps so that the next unit has good reception with the one upstream from it, while still providing users good coverage. its not the ideal solution, wifi never is. but its likely easier than having to run cables.

 

the benifit of the orbi type system is that each bast station has ethernet ports so you can plug in devices

 

If you can run cables to where you will put the access points then this is a better solution.

 

but at the end of the day you will likely be limited by the upload speed of the client rather than the device you choose.


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  #2005218 30-Apr-2018 14:43
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Jase2985:

 

a mesh network uses wifi as the back haul, thats the principle of it. if it used an Ethernet cable as the back haul its no longer a mesh setup.

 

you want 3 separate access points which connect via ethernet. you might even get away with 2 of them. space them more centrally in your house so they cover it all. can you run cables to where you need to?

 

 

I thought that the idea was that the "mesh" was referring to what the devices connecting to the network experienced rather than the backhaul.

 

ie. as you moved from one end of a building to the other your phone/tablet would only see one wireless network but seamlessly connect to the strongest node.

 

ASUS lets you connect selected models of their standard router range together to build a mesh network and I'm pretty sure it can be set up to use ethernet as the backhaul.

 

I'd imagine that a wireless backhaul could quite quickly become a bottleneck if you want to use multiple devices a long way away from the primary basestation.     


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  #2005231 30-Apr-2018 14:52
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I am running the new TP Link EAC wifi setup with a controller. Very similar to the Unifi gear but a bit cheaper. Been quite reliable so far. Each AP is hard wired back so not mesh really.


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  #2005239 30-Apr-2018 15:00
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One other thing is you don't install a mesh node where there is weak signal - you install it where the signal is still good and it extends from that point.

 

In your case, look at replacing the Netgear Nighthawk with either an Ubiquiti Amplifi (just looks very good) or a Netgear Orbi.





 
 
 
 


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  #2005254 30-Apr-2018 15:21
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evilengineer:

 

I thought that the idea was that the "mesh" was referring to what the devices connecting to the network experienced rather than the backhaul.

 

ie. as you moved from one end of a building to the other your phone/tablet would only see one wireless network but seamlessly connect to the strongest node.

 

ASUS lets you connect selected models of their standard router range together to build a mesh network and I'm pretty sure it can be set up to use ethernet as the backhaul.

 

I'd imagine that a wireless backhaul could quite quickly become a bottleneck if you want to use multiple devices a long way away from the primary basestation.     

 

 

mesh is to do with the AP not the client, the AP's talk to one another over a wireless mesh network, only 1 or 2 of these AP's will be connected to Ethernet and to the router. the rest will be connected by a dedicated wifi connection to the other AP's

 

in my house i have 1 wireless network, but my AP's are connected via Ethernet to the router, this is not a wifi mesh network because the AP's are all connected via cable.

 

something like the orbi has a dedicated 1.7Gbps 5GHz band solely for extending Internet speeds to Orbi satellites and 833Mbps to clients




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  #2005397 30-Apr-2018 19:17
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Thanks guys will give Orbi a shot.

 

Now for your dual band networks do you actually have them as the same name or do you have 2 different networks? One for the 2.4 Band and one for the 5Ghz band

 

 


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  #2005405 30-Apr-2018 19:21
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same name as my AP's will steer devices to the right band that works best for them.


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  #2005475 30-Apr-2018 21:29
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also worth noting, 

 

 

 

amplifi hd does not currently support MU-MIMO

 

 

 

orbi does support MU-MIMO

 

 

 

also orbi can do ethernet backhaul now,





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  #2005536 30-Apr-2018 22:08
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AKLGUY79:

 

Thanks guys will give Orbi a shot.

 

Now for your dual band networks do you actually have them as the same name or do you have 2 different networks? One for the 2.4 Band and one for the 5Ghz band

 

 

Good choice.  Orbi system works a treat -- I ran a cable from the basement standard Spark fibre modem (turn off wifi on this) to an orbi upstairs in the center of the house, which wifi meshes with another orbi in a difficult corner. Great cellphone coverage all over, no handover, and the more modern machines use the 5Ghz naturally--speedtest through these on wifi is right up at the 100/20 that I pay for.

 

Try to avoid calling your wifi orbi1kenorbi. I didn't.





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  #2005565 1-May-2018 00:17
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TP-Link Deco supports ethernet backhall:

 

https://www.tp-link.com/us/faq-1794.html



I'm not completly sure what the definition of "mesh" is, but lots of the consumer level mesh devices use non-wifi wireless for backhall, so I don't assume any backhall is wifi...

 

 

 

[edit] Asus AiMesh, can do ethernet back-hall also.

 

 

 

AiMesh incorporates several technologies to ensure performance and reliability. A rock-solid data 'backbone' connects all the AiMesh-enabled routers, with AiMesh intelligently choosing either a wired connection or the optimal frequency band — 5GHz or 2.4GHz. With tri-band routers, it will dedicate one of the two 5GHz bands to inter-router communications.

 

Reading this makes me think I should get a second asus router for my house...


Anybody have any experience on how the consumer "Whole home wifi" setups proform compared to say unifi gear?




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  #2005600 1-May-2018 08:09
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Ohh no I call my Networks "GCSB Surveillance". Or "Pretty Fi for WIFI"




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  #2005601 1-May-2018 08:10
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Doing a bit more research and while the Deco did ok in some reviews.

 

A couple of them did state the handover while walking around was a bit poor. More and more reviews are saying Orbi RBK50 is the one to go for.

 

 


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