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10 posts

Wannabe Geek


# 245049 16-Jan-2019 09:59
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Hi folks,

 

I've never posted in this fine forum, but I've certainly browsed it a lot from time to time.

 

I'm about to start building a new house in February and have been doing some thinking about our home network.

 

I have VERY little networking experience but I want to ensure we get a good, future-proof setup in our new home.

 

We will wire for Ethernet (Cat 6) and have fibre installed.

 

There will be a large central utility cupboard housing the hot water cylinder and ventilation system, and I'm thinking it would make sense to put the network distribution cabinet in there too, as it should allow for good wireless signal around the house (approx 200m2, incl. double garage).

 

I guess I'm looking for advice on how to best go about setting the cabinet and network up (I like stuff to be neat and tidy). I also have a NAS and I'm not sure whether that needs to go into/near the cabinet or whether I could plug it into an outlet somewhere else in the house.

 

About the only thing I'm sure about at this point is that I need a plastic cabinet, as metal ones are no good for wifi signal!

 

Any advice much appreciated. Cheers


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Banana?
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  # 2161894 16-Jan-2019 10:06
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Hot water cupboards get hot. Networking gear won't like it very much (though, ours doesn't get so hot as to heat anything up dangerously, but I still wouldn't put modems and switches in there). Cabling should be fine in there. If it is a large cupboard (more like a room) and you can ventilate it, you will be OK.

 

To save money, you could run cables yourself - at least two cables to each bedroom, 6 to the TV area and 2 or more to every other location you might one day want to plug something in (think about cameras and ceiling points as well - it is much easier to run cable before walls and linings are on than it is afterwards). If you label them all, and leave them unterminated, you could then get a data cabling person in (not an electrician usually) and they could tidy up, terminate and label everything.


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  # 2161896 16-Jan-2019 10:09
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Hot water cylinder cupboards are often warm, and sometimes moist if you dry damp clothes in there. I wonder if that's the best place for networking equipment? Having said that, I have a house alarm in the ceiling, it gets over 40 degrees up there in summer, so it's probably fine. Maybe you want to think about ventilation in that cupboard though - have some ducting installed that you could install a fan in later, to suck air in from the house and push it either outside or into the roof cavity. Key thing there is if it's open to the roof cavity without a fan it would probably get even warmer.

 

You might be best off with multiple WiFi access points, and they're probably a lot easier to wire in / install before the house is finished. Someone here can advise on the system to use. One good quality WiFi access point up high might be ok for a 200 sq m house, might not.


 
 
 
 


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  # 2161898 16-Jan-2019 10:12
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I would advice working out where the ETP (External Connection point is going to go, then you will need to get the hybrid CAT5 cable from chorus and run that from the ETP to where your ONT will be (network cabinet etc) either that or run conduit with 2-3 draw wires in there. Then you can have your whole setup in the cupboard.

 

personally I would put a small cabinet on the wall and have the ONT in there and then run a cable to a network rack nearby with my router and other gear in it.

 

I also would run 2x access points as opposed to relying on one wifi router to cover your whole house. for this you would need to run a couple of CAT6 cables to the ceiling in different locations to allow you to mount the AP's there. most will run over power over Ethernet so you can provide power for them back at the network rack.

 

The NAS can go into the network rack as it doesn't need to be in a room and it keeps it out of the way.

 

 

 

 




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Wannabe Geek


  # 2161899 16-Jan-2019 10:13
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Thanks for the cabling advice, trig42

 

It'll be a new hot water cylinder (properly insulated), so it won't make the cupboard hot, but perhaps a fraction warmer than the rest of the house.


mdf

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  # 2161908 16-Jan-2019 10:28
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Have a look at this thread too.


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Ultimate Geek

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  # 2161910 16-Jan-2019 10:33
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I went through this building process in 2017. I am pretty happy with my setup its nice and clean.

 

My house had some home hub installed in the garage, it was some dreadful patch panel thing that was included with the house but nevertheless I have all my gear in the garage. There were ethernet ports in my office, bedroom, and anywhere a TV was. I usually had 2 or 3 ports.

 

Then I installed wireless access points on the roof, one on each floor. I used these which I got from go wireless NZ.
https://www.ui.com/unifi/unifi-ap-ac-lite/ 

 

So all the ethernet panels and cables that go to the access points in the roof terminate back to the patch panel box. I ripped out the panel and crimped some rj45 plugs on the end myself. Then threw a gigabit switch in there. 

I also have my internet connection terminating there, so that is where the router is. My router is an Edgerouter PoE so i use it to power the unifi's. All in all, everything that i can cable in like TV's, Xbox, apple tv etc all doesn't clog up my wireless. So I have taken a lot of devices off wifi. Which means my wireless throughout the whole property is excellent. I only use mobile phones, ipads and IoT devices on it, so I never have problems, even if someone is streaming or downloading.

 

Hope it helps.

 

 

 

 


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  # 2161914 16-Jan-2019 10:45
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I think a common experience of many people who do this is to really think about the space where things are going to 'congregate', and what you're seeking to achieve.

 

The in-wall cabinets are ok for aggregating a lot of cables to a patch panel and switch, but are usually quite poor for useful power points and pure physical space for equipment, brick power adaptors and so on. Plus you need to have the flexibility to get your hands in there and easily see what you're doing etc. I don't like these cabinets for this reason - great for cables really unless you put an enormous one in.

 

You mentioned a NAS, and I'm guessing other things will end up in a common area you havent yet considered (UPS? additional backup disks?).

 

The heat, ventilation, dust and other such things are _REALLY_ important to consider, as is other things like 4-way plugs and so on. You'd be surprised how quickly things multiply and a small space fills up. The hot water closet will almost certainly become a linen cupboard, so your shelf space will rapidly give way to more important things like towels.

 

Look at what kit you have, power warts, plugs points and so on... then have a wee think about how things will terminate. I'm not a big fan of bringing everything back into one location unless I have lots of dedicated space just for it...

 

 





________

 

Antonios K

 

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  # 2161917 16-Jan-2019 10:51
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@trig42 @timmmay

 

 "large central utility cupboard housing the hot water cylinder and ventilation system"

 

It will be fine with a modern hot water cylinder in there. will probably sit in the mid 20's temp wise so nothing to worry about. the heat in the cupboard will be generated by the pipes more so than the cylinder. my hot water cupboard is about 700x700 and its less than 30 degrees in there.

 

having everything in one place allows you to run a single UPS to power the ONT, Router and any phone/AP devices


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Ultimate Geek


  # 2161919 16-Jan-2019 10:56
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angler:

 

Thanks for the cabling advice, trig42

 

It'll be a new hot water cylinder (properly insulated), so it won't make the cupboard hot, but perhaps a fraction warmer than the rest of the house.

 

 

 

 

The other thing about Hot Water Cylinders are that they are earthed ( so are an ANTI-aerials ) if you want Wifi to perform best you don't position it near/behind/Shadowed by any earthed device  (Hotwater Cylinders / fridges / Aircon Systems / Power boards / Metal Splash backs / fire/heater flue systems etc)


dt

531 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2161920 16-Jan-2019 10:57
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Heres something cool to consider for a new build as well. 

 

 

 

https://inwall-hd.ubnt.com/

 

 

 

 


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Master Geek


  # 2161924 16-Jan-2019 11:27
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Following this thread with interest as we are going through the plans for a new build at the moment.

 

It currently only allows for 3 network points in a 2 story house on a concrete slab. I would like more points, preferably in every room.

 

I have some trouble convincing my better half of the benefit to justify spending (any) money on it. 




10 posts

Wannabe Geek


  # 2161928 16-Jan-2019 11:44
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Many thanks for your helpful replies everyone :)

 

Questions now whirling around my brain...

 

1) What type of cabinet/network rack would suit? Is there a popular model?

 

2) Would I need a patch panel?

 

3) If I'm going to have a network rack, what do I need to tell the electrician (and fibre connection person) to do?

 

4) Am I in way over my head? (Answer: yes!)

 

Cheers


832 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2161930 16-Jan-2019 11:51
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https://www.chorus.co.nz/help-and-support/wiring-broadband/home-wiring-contractors

 

see that other pages around this one too

 

----

 

At least they are trying to get some form of structured wiring installed in new houses


dt

531 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2161961 16-Jan-2019 12:29
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Lostja:

 

Following this thread with interest as we are going through the plans for a new build at the moment.

 

It currently only allows for 3 network points in a 2 story house on a concrete slab. I would like more points, preferably in every room.

 

I have some trouble convincing my better half of the benefit to justify spending (any) money on it. 

 

 

 

 

you definitely want at least one per room, but would recommend 2, go for 4 behind any tv entertainment areas

 

The cost of cabling is dirt cheap, its the labor that bumps it up. so the price of running 2 cables over 1 you'll hardly notice a difference.

 

Its a lot easier to do it now than after, you never know when you'll need it in the future and it can also help with resell (never know, it might be a geek thats interested in your house if you sell) 

 

 

 

 


dt

531 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2161982 16-Jan-2019 13:34
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angler:

 

Many thanks for your helpful replies everyone :)

 

Questions now whirling around my brain...

 

1) What type of cabinet/network rack would suit? Is there a popular model?

 

2) Would I need a patch panel?

 

3) If I'm going to have a network rack, what do I need to tell the electrician (and fibre connection person) to do?

 

4) Am I in way over my head? (Answer: yes!)

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

A network cabinet with a terminated patch panel would give a very clean finished product and give your avg geek a hardon for a home setup but arent always necessary depending on your requirements and of course can bring up the cost quite a bit 

 

Dynamix do a nice solid wall cabinet but are pretty expensive for a residential build upwards of 1k

 

couple of questions 

 

Any idea how many wired devices you'll be using? i.e computers, smart TV's, Access points etc

 

Do you already have a switch or will you be buying something? do you have anything else like a fancy router or firewall already? are they rackable etc?

 

I would definitely recommend having some conduit run as well even if thats just for the fibre to be able to terminate into your cabinet / rack  but would be awesome to conduit into each room as well if money permits (could even do that part yourself to save)

 

 

 

 


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