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floydbloke

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#270139 25-Apr-2020 10:04
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Looking to get a more reliable and resilient WiFi set-up at home, hopefully with a single SSID throughout.  Picture above shows my current setup (other hardwired ethernet devices omitted).  Particularly the HG659 in the lounge seems to drop its WiFi frequently.  3 different SSIDs currently.  Vodafone fibre 100/20 internet connection.

 

The Unifi AC Lite  x 3 or the Netgear Orbi RBK13 1x router + 2 x AP look like they would do the job.

 

I'm leaning towards  the Unifi option but don't really know enough about the MESH thing to understand if that might be better.  It's nice that the Orbi has a router that could potentially replace the downstairs HG659 but I need multiple ethernet ports and the analogiue phone adapter down there so I'm guessing that I'd need additional kit (potentially keep the HG659) for that, right? The HG659 downstairs seems stable enough as an internet router, it's just the WiFi overall that's causing grief.  Orbi is a bit cheaper as well

 

Also, if I understand correctly WiFi roaming is never going to be perfect unless I spend big $$$$ on commercial grade kit, and also depends a lot on the user devices?

 

Thoughts, views, experiences please?





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cyril7
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  #2470895 25-Apr-2020 12:23
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Hi, I would recommend the UniFi personally, but that said I hear good things about Orbi and its physical format may appeal more for you. As an aside my current home setup is a Mikrotik RB760 router, and three UniFi Inwalls in a three floor house that results in seemless wireless coverage.

 

Mesh is just a fancy way of saying it can use wireless backhaul, and in the Orbi's case it has a seperate 5GHz radio just for doing the backhaul so does not consume your 5GHz bandwidth that some other products do. However in your case you have wired backhaul so wireless meshing is not relevant, and a wired backhaul will beat any wireless backhaul any day.

 

Cyril


Mehrts
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  #2470898 25-Apr-2020 12:27
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Before you go spending any money, have you tried setting identical SSIDs on each unit? If you have the option to, make sure that none of the units are using the same channels. This should vastly improve the roaming situation.

 

Client roaming can be very hit and miss, and usually it's the client device that decides whether the signal is too low before searching for a stronger signal. With higher end access points, you will have the option to set a minimum signal level at which the access point will kick the client device off, essentially forcing it to search for a stronger signal again.

 

Ubiquiti have recently released the Dream Machine, which essentially is an all-in-one router/switch/access point, and from there you can connect other access points, however you'll need to use the PoE injectors as the Dream Machine doesn't have PoE. It also doesn't have any analog phone support.

 

To be honest, I wouldn't worry about a mesh style system if you've already got the cables in place. Wired connections will always beat a wireless/mesh one for reliability.

 

If you want to keep it simple, then I'd suggest three APs of your choice (Unifi AP-Lites or LRs will be fine if you're after a basic but sturdy setup). Depending on how many Ethernet devices you have, I'd just power them from their PoE injectors, or if you're after a tidy solution, use a small PoE Switch instead to power the APs. This will also provide more Ethernet ports in general.

 

Keep your existing HG659 in the downstairs bedroom but turn off its wifi. This will provide connections for the phone any Ethernet devices that are there.

 

If you're after a very versatile Wifi product, take a look at the "in-wall" access points from Ubiquiti. They're a wifi AP as well as either a two or four port Ethernet switch.

 

 


 
 
 
 


Jase2985
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  #2470906 25-Apr-2020 12:36
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out of those 2 choices i would goi with the Unifi because it has wired backhaul. the orbi you are relying on a wifi backhaul. you already have a network cable to each position so one that supports a wired backhaul would be better. this one supports wired backhaul NETGEAR Orbi Home Mesh WiFi System 3-Pack (RBK23). each satellite has an extra Ethernet port on it


cyril7
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  #2470910 25-Apr-2020 12:38
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And if you do go with the UniFi, feel free to DM me if you want to setup a site in my cloud controller, or you can also check out michaelmufys one.

 

Cyril


floydbloke

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  #2470925 25-Apr-2020 13:02
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Thank you for the advice.  Looks like I'll go the Unifi route (pun intended), will check out their in-wall devices.





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cyril7
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  #2470932 25-Apr-2020 13:12
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Just be aware the In wall devices do not come with a POE injector, so either get a UniFi switch that supports them, but would be a bit pricey, or this unmanaged one will do the trick.

 

Cyril


floydbloke

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  #2471160 25-Apr-2020 15:37
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I've gone for the Unifi AC Lite x 3 (individual ones ship with the POE adapter).  It ticks all the boxes I need it to.

 

cyril7:

 

And if you do go with the UniFi, feel free to DM me if you want to setup a site in my cloud controller, or you can also check out michaelmufys one.

 

Cyril

 

 

@cyril7  Thank you.  I'll start off with a locally hosted controller.  Not planning on doing any fancy stuff so don't believe I need to keep it running 24 x 7.  But things can change and if they do I may take you up on your offer and give you a shout.





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cyril7
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  #2471177 25-Apr-2020 16:15
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Hi good call.

Cyril

michaelmurfy
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  #2471190 25-Apr-2020 16:36
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@floydbloke As @cyril7 mentioned I also have a controller that is up and running 24/7 (I also use it myself). For the likes of Wireless AI which automatically tunes your network it is better to have an always running controller.

 

Post about my controller is here: https://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=66&topicid=204413 - feel free to PM me at any time if you want to use it.





cyril7
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  #2471193 25-Apr-2020 16:46
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Hi, just a little more on UniFi from my perspective, I now have around 40sites on my controller, mostly SMEs and some private residentials, the SME's easily pay for a small machine in Vultr to run it all.

 

Most of the SMEs are running AC-Lites and more recently I have been installing NanoHD's. And recently installed a modest number of InWalls at a resort that had existing cabling to each room but was in serious need of wireless improvement, out of that I ended up with three left over, so worked perfectly in my new home, otherwise probably would have gone for AC-Lites.

 

Cyril 


floydbloke

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  #2474377 1-May-2020 09:08
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Got my shiny new Unifi AC Lites up and running, and making use of Michael's cloud controller, and I've now got the stability and resilience I needed.

 

Some observations:

 

  • That controller is fantastic.  Takes a bit of getting used to but the amount of information and control it gives is great, but
  • It does take a fair bit of faffing about (and tech savvyness)to get them up and running (the detection tool didn't pick them up, had to SSH, then they needed an update which took a few goes). Might have been simpler with an on-premise controller. I wouldn't recommend them for your average consumer ( I guess that's why HN, NL etc. don't sell them)
  • The single box units come with a POE adapter to power them, but don't include an RJ45 flylead.  I hadn't catered for needing an extra 3 since I was replacing two existing APs.  Managed to scrounge around and find enough to get me going fortunately.




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