Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


mdf

mdf

2684 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

#275869 14-Sep-2020 16:48
Send private message quote this post

I don't crimp many ethernet plugs, but when I do, it seems I have to crimp about twice as many as I need to (crimping failures). 

 

I have (what I thought was) a decent Hanlong crimping tool and Dynamix two part ethernet plugs.

 

Should I be going with one big squeeze? Squeeze a couple of times? Plug shoved in hard versus loose etc?

 

I've tried a few different techniques but there is no obvious rhyme or reason to crimps that seem to work first time and crimps that just need chopping off and trying again.

 

No issues with punching down jackpoints, just crimping the plugs for things like POE powered CCTV cameras and WAPs.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
chevrolux
4614 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #2563860 14-Sep-2020 16:53
Send private message quote this post

By failures, you mean you put a tester on and get missing pairs?

One big squeeze is all they need. And not even a particularly big one, just close the tool.

Second thing that comes to mind is the correct plug for the type of cable. Cat 5e vs Cat 6 and solid vs stranded wire

mdf

mdf

2684 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2563862 14-Sep-2020 17:02
Send private message quote this post

chevrolux: By failures, you mean you put a tester on and get missing pairs?

 

Yep. Tester is a pretty crappy PBtech one that I bought on impulse during a "sale" thinking it was a good deal. Lesson learnt there though. It it just a two part unit that lights up each pin in turn and you (hopefully) match on the receiver.

Second thing that comes to mind is the correct plug for the type of cable. Cat 5e vs Cat 6 and solid vs stranded wire

 

Yeah I bought a packet of both solid and stranded plugs. I think I've used maybe one of the stranded ones ever and that was just to replace a broken latch. But I reliably use solid with solid and they are cat6 as is the spool of ethernet cable I've got. I might have used a cat6 on a 5e cable once?


 
 
 
 


hio77
'That VDSL Cat'
12620 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2563988 14-Sep-2020 18:15
Send private message quote this post

Take 50m of cable out. Sit down for an evening with a collection of ends and practice.

You will be fine after that. Until you go trying to use carrier grade tough cable. That stuff is a nightmare to get in the jack!




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


nztim
989 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  #2564002 14-Sep-2020 18:49
Send private message quote this post

hio77: Take 50m of cable out. Sit down for an evening with a collection of ends and practice.

You will be fine after that. Until you go trying to use carrier grade tough cable. That stuff is a nightmare to get in the jack!


Lucky we aren't back in the 90s, the white cable is didn't have a stripe so you you had this nightmare of remembering which white was with which pair

SomeoneSomewhere
277 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2564004 14-Sep-2020 18:54
Send private message quote this post

I've run into some of that recently; can't remember whose. Not fun.

 

 

 

I find that I often need to insert it into the jack, note if some cores are too long, pull out, cut down, insert again, then crimp.


nztim
989 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  #2564005 14-Sep-2020 18:59
Send private message quote this post

SomeoneSomewhere:

I've run into some of that recently; can't remember whose. Not fun.


 


I find that I often need to insert it into the jack, note if some cores are too long, pull out, cut down, insert again, then crimp.



I haven’t seen it in new cable since the late 90s so that must be old cabling your dealing with

SomeoneSomewhere
277 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2564006 14-Sep-2020 19:09
Send private message quote this post

Nah, I think it was like a gel Cat6A or something.


 
 
 
 


MadEngineer
2207 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #2564011 14-Sep-2020 19:20
Send private message quote this post

Plenty of YouTube videos on the subject.

Only need one squeeze of the tool - you should find it clicks all the way down then it’s done. Any further squeezes won’t add anything except perhaps that weird satisfaction akin to the couple of spurts one must give a battery drill prior to use. .

Some basic pointers:

Cut the cable flush with the tool
Spin the end of the cable carefully against the sheath blade ensuring you’re not nicking any of the internal insulation. Any nicks then cut again.
Flatten out the pairs and measure against the plug with some additional length say 5mm spare.
Arrange the colours as required, keeping them all flat between your thumb and first finger.
Measure again against the plug and do a final cut the end of the pairs so they’re all even length
Flatten again between your thumb and finger
Insert the cores into the plug with a little pressure against the back of it so they stay in order.
Inspect. The cores should go all the way to the end of the plug with the sheath well inside the plastic crimp and should be still in the correct order.
Crimp
Inspect again that the cores are all at the end of the plug and the conductors have properly come down onto all the cores.

richms
23683 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2564036 14-Sep-2020 20:28
Send private message quote this post

Best thing I did was get the plugs with the thru holes and the crimp tool that chops them off at the front of the plug. So much easier.

 

Its got a US patent so your best bet is off aliexpress for the copies of it since its stupid money from anyone that sells in the US and licenses it.





Richard rich.ms

nztim
989 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  #2564060 14-Sep-2020 21:00
Send private message quote this post

richms:

Best thing I did was get the plugs with the thru holes and the crimp tool that chops them off at the front of the plug. So much easier.


Its got a US patent so your best bet is off aliexpress for the copies of it since its stupid money from anyone that sells in the US and licenses it.



Do those knockoffs on Aliexpress work ok?

richms
23683 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2564061 14-Sep-2020 21:01
Send private message quote this post

Works fine on the 30ish runs I have done so far, Much easier when up a ladder outside doing a camera.





Richard rich.ms

itxtme
1780 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #2564080 14-Sep-2020 21:34
Send private message quote this post

MadEngineer: Some basic pointers:

Cut the cable flush with the tool
Spin the end of the cable carefully against the sheath blade ensuring you’re not nicking any of the internal insulation. Any nicks then cut again.
Flatten out the pairs and measure against the plug with some additional length say 5mm spare.
Arrange the colours as required, keeping them all flat between your thumb and first finger.
Measure again against the plug and do a final cut the end of the pairs so they’re all even length
Flatten again between your thumb and finger
Insert the cores into the plug with a little pressure against the back of it so they stay in order.
Inspect. The cores should go all the way to the end of the plug with the sheath well inside the plastic crimp and should be still in the correct order.
Crimp
Inspect again that the cores are all at the end of the plug and the conductors have properly come down onto all the cores.

 

I can almost guarantee this is your problem.  I find removing more outer sheath for straightening and aligning the colours works best.  I always hold the cable end between my thumb and forefinger with the wires pressed flat when doing the final cut, and that helps keep the order when you insert. 

 

Also start looking through the plastic to understand why it failed.  Looking from the end of the connector for middle wires.  If they are not sitting flush with the end you are cutting your sheath too short.


Mehrts
136 posts

Master Geek


  #2564081 14-Sep-2020 21:35
Send private message quote this post

richms:

 

Best thing I did was get the plugs with the thru holes and the crimp tool that chops them off at the front of the plug. So much easier.

 

 

The two-part (modular) Dynamix RJ-45 connectors are similar to these, as you simply feed all eight wires through the plastic guide, cut them flush, insert the whole lot into the rest of the connector, and then crimp it.

 

However, they have the advantage that the ends of the wires aren't exposed to the end of the plug, so there's no chance of any potential short circuits if the wires were able to touch any metallic socket internals.


sbiddle
29286 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #2564152 15-Sep-2020 07:32
Send private message quote this post

MadEngineer: Plenty of YouTube videos on the subject.

Only need one squeeze of the tool - you should find it clicks all the way down then it’s done. Any further squeezes won’t add anything except perhaps that weird satisfaction akin to the couple of spurts one must give a battery drill prior to use. .

Some basic pointers:

Cut the cable flush with the tool
Spin the end of the cable carefully against the sheath blade ensuring you’re not nicking any of the internal insulation. Any nicks then cut again.
Flatten out the pairs and measure against the plug with some additional length say 5mm spare.
Arrange the colours as required, keeping them all flat between your thumb and first finger.
Measure again against the plug and do a final cut the end of the pairs so they’re all even length
Flatten again between your thumb and finger
Insert the cores into the plug with a little pressure against the back of it so they stay in order.
Inspect. The cores should go all the way to the end of the plug with the sheath well inside the plastic crimp and should be still in the correct order.
Crimp
Inspect again that the cores are all at the end of the plug and the conductors have properly come down onto all the cores.

 

OP is talking about two piece connectors though so is presumably using cat6 cable with cat6 connectors so needs an extra step for the insert.

 

There are two key things IMHO.

 

First is to ensure your side cutters are super sharp. If they're blunt they will not cut the cable cleanly and will struggle to fit into inserts property.

 

The second is to cut the cable on a 45 degree angle before putting it into the insert when using cat6 connectors - this makes life so much easier when putting the cable into the insert. Once it's in the insert you then cut it to length at the end of the insert.

 

I'd typically terminate 1000+ connectors per year and probably have a failure rate from those of probably 1 or 2 connectors. The only frustrating thing is that not all cable is created equal - some cable is just a real pain to straighten out.

 

In terms of cat5 connectors I never measure against the connector for length. Maybe it's because I've done so many I know the length things should be, but the sheath will wush back over the cable to stay secure so it doesn't need to be exact. The worst thing I see is so many people who leave exposed cable out of the back of the connector meaning the outer sheath isn't protecting the cable.

 

 


sbiddle
29286 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #2564153 15-Sep-2020 07:35
Send private message quote this post

Mehrts:

 

richms:

 

Best thing I did was get the plugs with the thru holes and the crimp tool that chops them off at the front of the plug. So much easier.

 

 

The two-part (modular) Dynamix RJ-45 connectors are similar to these, as you simply feed all eight wires through the plastic guide, cut them flush, insert the whole lot into the rest of the connector, and then crimp it.

 

However, they have the advantage that the ends of the wires aren't exposed to the end of the plug, so there's no chance of any potential short circuits if the wires were able to touch any metallic socket internals.

 

 

I've always considered the tool less connectors like that to be something for people who were too lazy to learn how to crimp normal connectors. 😃

 

I absolutely hate them, regular connectors work perfectly and IMHO are actually quicker.

 

 


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic





News »

Huawei launches IdeaHub Pro in New Zealand
Posted 27-Oct-2020 16:41


Southland-based IT specialist providing virtual services worldwide
Posted 27-Oct-2020 15:55


NASA discovers water on sunlit surface of Moon
Posted 27-Oct-2020 08:30


Huawei introduces new features to Petal Search, Maps and Docs
Posted 26-Oct-2020 18:05


Nokia selected by NASA to build first ever cellular network on the Moon
Posted 21-Oct-2020 08:34


Nanoleaf enhances lighting line with launch of Triangles and Mini Triangles
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:18


Synology unveils DS16211+
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:12


Ingram Micro introduces FootfallCam to New Zealand channel
Posted 17-Oct-2020 20:06


Dropbox adopts Virtual First working policy
Posted 17-Oct-2020 19:47


OPPO announces Reno4 Series 5G line-up in NZ
Posted 16-Oct-2020 08:52


Microsoft Highway to a Hundred expands to Asia Pacific
Posted 14-Oct-2020 09:34


Spark turns on 5G in Auckland
Posted 14-Oct-2020 09:29


AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors
Posted 9-Oct-2020 10:13


Teletrac Navman launches integrated multi-camera solution for transport and logistics industry
Posted 8-Oct-2020 10:57


Farmside hits 10,000 RBI customers
Posted 7-Oct-2020 15:32









Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.