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4 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 98807 6-Mar-2012 23:14
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Have been asked to come up with the IT suite for a small non profit training outfit.

at the moment the simple (cheapest in short run) solution is an old desktop setup as a file server to hold database tables and common files ect with a router attached just to make a WiFi network. (no internet there)

but i have recently seen a few "Thin Clients" showing up on trademe, my understanding is that they have sod all power behind them, but offload alot of the processes to the server.

my main problem is i have no idea where to start with big (rack) servers or how much grunt a server would need to run 8-10 thin clients, mainly running web browsers, mainly some word processing.

any advice is much appreciated thanks.

the deciding factor of near anything will be cost (short and long term) only need hardware as we have licences sorted.

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272 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 591475 7-Mar-2012 06:14
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Citrix or remote Desktop services (RDS on windows 2008) with a published desktop might be what you want.

On a G6 HP server we can run 50 user if we have to but 30 is what we prefer.

For cost saving, RDS would be the cheeper option (no citrix Lic required).

You would still have to pay for a server, server 2008 lic, & RDS user lic.




4 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 591644 7-Mar-2012 12:05
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What are the specs on the G6? i see they start at 4gb ram and can take upto 192gb

 
 
 
 


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 591666 7-Mar-2012 12:32
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Yea thin clients can be good and make it easier to manage. You probably should get a decent server with a dual/quad core CPU, hardware RAID card (SATA drives will be fine) and about 16GB of RAM. You can then install a virtualization hypervisor like VMware and have one VM for your domain controller and the other for your terminal server. Pretty straight forward.

In terms of rack etc. you could get a short depth Supermicro server with a socket 1155 motherboard. which will easily fit into a small rack wiring cabinet in the corner along with your switch etc.







4 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 591671 7-Mar-2012 12:37
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ok i understand most of that. you lost me on the VMware and domain controller.
no need to type out a long explanation, but perhaps i need a little more reading material before i get too deep.

gjm

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 591674 7-Mar-2012 12:39
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just remember that if you are a charity then you can get charity license prices from Microsoft, have a look here
http://www.techsoup.net.nz/microsoft




[Amstrad CPC 6128: 128k Memory: 3 inch floppy drive: Colour Screen]



4 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 591675 7-Mar-2012 12:41
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thanks gjm, we do have other means of getting licenses (legit ones) but can't say too much about it on a public forum

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 591683 7-Mar-2012 12:52
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Dynamite: ok i understand most of that. you lost me on the VMware and domain controller.
no need to type out a long explanation, but perhaps i need a little more reading material before i get too deep.


OK virtualization (VMware) means you can have multiple servers on the same physical server e.g. imagine running 4 seperate Windows 7 "computers" on the same physical box each with their own keyboard, mouse etc.

A domain controller is required for Terminal servers, it basically looks after user accounts e.g. in a big network you have computers and users and a domain controller will allow any user to login to any computer with their own username/password.





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Master Geek
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  Reply # 592152 8-Mar-2012 09:23
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Having worked with TC and Server Based Computing (SBC) for long enough, here is my two cents worth.

Do not assume that the solution is Thin Client or SBC, work out the requirements first and the needs of the organization. There are many solutions out there, each having their pros and cons.

There are many considerations when designing a TC based solutin, even for a small setup. Examples being Printing, Application compatibility and licensing. Most importantly, you can't leave it to run on its owwn, it needs to be managed and maintained to prevent it falling apart.

As I said, work out requirements in details, as much detailed as possible. It'll help you arrive at the right solution.

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  Reply # 599657 25-Mar-2012 03:05
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Just thought I would say
I setup thin client networks and manage a few, but one thing you need to make clear to your charity client is that thin clients don't work with video or anything involving graphics. Eg photoshop, paint drawing.
They also don't like flash banner adverts on websites.

But for word processing, company database applications and light surfing they work awesome. I have remote offices around the country where we just get a broadband connection and courier out a thin client preprogrammed to connect to a server in napier. If a computer or thin client breaks down, we just courier out another one and they plug it in and send the old one back. Super simple to manage.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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