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Wannabe Geek


Topic # 240544 13-Sep-2018 09:42
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For my summative project at Yoobee Auckland, I am developing a home climate control application. As part of my research, I would like to ask the users of Geekzone a few questions to help steer me in the right direction in terms of features and functionality. The idea is that an existing electronics company develops this app to let customers control their heaters, dehumidifiers, etc. remotely.

 

As I am currently in the first phase of my research, all I need at this point is an understanding of the problems people might be having with their home heating and ideas for features to include in the application.

 

 

 

     

  1. Problems to solve (for example: coming home to a cold house, damp homes, kids health issues)
  2. Features to include (for example: zones, schedules, password protection)
  3. Essential functionality (for example: being able to control the system remotely)

 

 

 

Any input is appreciated! :) 

 

TIA


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2089890 13-Sep-2018 11:21
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1. Problems to solve: Temperature and humidity across *multiple* zones/regions in the house, with each sensor knowing what device it needs to control to provide the required outcome, knowledge of people being home or away (ties into alarm system perhaps)

 

2. Features to include: Control of the system to tie into *any* home automation system / more an open standards approach for anyone to use with the home automation system of THEIR choice (possibly providing a multitude of protocols available that one could use for control would be preferred over proprietary protocols)

 

3. Essential functionality: Vendor agnostic is absolutely paramount.

 

 

 

IMO, these solutions have already been done to death, so you really need something that is far superior and smarter than anything else on the market... 


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  Reply # 2089929 13-Sep-2018 11:57
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chimera:

 

IMO, these solutions have already been done to death, so you really need something that is far superior and smarter than anything else on the market... 

 

 

I'm with @chimera on this point. So aren't you just reinventing the wheel by asking us what can be found on the many websites with long lists of intelligent features including managing solar gain, reducing losses e.g. closing blinds, fire safety, and so on.

 

Anyway, before I invest more time and thought on the issue, I'd like to know whether you are actually planning to make an application we could use? And will it be something better than what already exists?


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  Reply # 2089937 13-Sep-2018 12:07
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  1. Problems to solve. Coming home to warm house, minimizing electricity consumption during defined peak periods
  2. Features to include. Define temperature range (thermostat) with ability to vary range at different times of the day (based on defined peak power periods and preferences (e.g. cooler overnight)
  3. Essential functionality. Thermostat. Control remotely. Compatible with a range of hardware

 

 


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  Reply # 2090068 13-Sep-2018 14:01
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An outside temp sensor and sun load sensor. And both indoor temp and humidity sensors.

Combined with enough smarts to anticipate changes in heating and cooling load, with changes to sun load / outside temps. Indoor temp and humidity regulation, Switching heatpumps between cooling / dry modes during summer. And heating / external dehumidifier in winter.

And most importantly, actually heat / cool the room to the set temperature. It sounds basic, but a surprisingly large number of thermostats struggle with this. Problems such as large hysteresis, temp drift, overshoot or undershoot of the set point, poor compensation of load changes.

An indication to the user if the room goes outside of or fails to reach set point.







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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2090463 14-Sep-2018 09:24
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Thanks people. To be clear, the summative project is for a user experience design / interaction design. With that in mind, the only thing that will be developed is the front-end. And yes, I did my own research, but I thought it might be helpful to ask some tech-savvy potential users what they think is important. I got some useful answers, so thanks again.


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  Reply # 2090472 14-Sep-2018 09:37
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One thing to add which is often overlooked is the CO2 level. Houses with gas stoves or heaters reach dangerous levels very quickly and that can affect brain function and health. Not sure if it's part of this but it could be something to look at.

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  Reply # 2090474 14-Sep-2018 09:38
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Make a a group of heat pumps work with the Nest Thermostat and you can take my money...

 

 

 

 


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