Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




957 posts

Ultimate Geek


#272475 26-Jun-2020 15:51
Send private message quote this post

I want a Homekit smart light switch, I wonder if I could install an Eve EU switch safely here?

 

Before you suggest it, I don’t want a smart bulb solution as the lights are fancy filament bulbs that are designed to suit the industrial vibe of the property, rightly or wrongly. So just like some comments about wiring EU switches into a NZ house.

 

Thanks in advance.





BlinkyBill


Create new topic
  #2513119 26-Jun-2020 17:22
Send private message quote this post

A quick google appears to show 120V 15A max. So based on that short answer is no.


4915 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #2513134 26-Jun-2020 17:32
Send private message quote this post

You’d be better to get any other type of light switch available over here and supported by homebridge.

Though activeautomation, while selling zwave, which would be too expensive for just one switch, might have a homekit relay. They do have the fibaro homekit sensors but hadn’t looked for homekit relays as I tend to buy their zwave ones.

I think there’s someone in oz that has certified either a sonof or shelly1. So that would be usable here only if you buy from them. Those will be able to integrate with homebridge which allows non homekit devices to show up




Previously known as psycik

OpenHAB: Gigabyte AMD A8 BrixOpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller, Raspberry PI, Wemos D1 Mini, Zwave, Xiaomi Humidity and Temperature sensors and Bluetooth LE Sensors
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 10
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


 
 
 
 


1328 posts

Uber Geek


  #2513180 26-Jun-2020 17:47
Send private message quote this post

davidcole:

I think there’s someone in oz that has certified either a sonof or shelly1. So that would be usable here only if you buy from them.

 

The Shelly 1 and Shelly 1PM are now certified in Aus/NZ.


4915 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #2513184 26-Jun-2020 17:50
Send private message quote this post

SirHumphreyAppleby:

davidcole:

I think there’s someone in oz that has certified either a sonof or shelly1. So that would be usable here only if you buy from them.


The Shelly 1 and Shelly 1PM are now certified in Aus/NZ.



Where can we see this? Not sure how that certification works?




Previously known as psycik

OpenHAB: Gigabyte AMD A8 BrixOpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller, Raspberry PI, Wemos D1 Mini, Zwave, Xiaomi Humidity and Temperature sensors and Bluetooth LE Sensors
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 10
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


1328 posts

Uber Geek


  #2513186 26-Jun-2020 17:52
Send private message quote this post

davidcole: Where can we see this? Not sure how that certification works?

 

There is a Geekzone thread here.

 

 




957 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2513895 28-Jun-2020 13:47
Send private message quote this post

Zorg2000:

 

A quick google appears to show 120V 15A max. So based on that short answer is no.

 

 

you are looking at the US version. EU version is 240v.





BlinkyBill




957 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2513896 28-Jun-2020 13:49
Send private message quote this post

Thanks for the comments above, but I was after advice around wiring in EU switches.





BlinkyBill


 
 
 
 


  #2514120 28-Jun-2020 20:07
Send private message quote this post

BlinkyBill:

 

Zorg2000:

 

A quick google appears to show 120V 15A max. So based on that short answer is no.

 

 

you are looking at the US version. EU version is 240v.

 

 

Sorry my mistake. If I am looking at the right one this time it says: 

 

 

 

 

 

Input: 230 V~ 50 / 60 Hz 
Max. 5 A / 1150 W

 

Let me preface this with I am not an electrician, but it appears that in this scenario the 5A could be a problem being that most residential lighting circuits in NZ are 10A, meaning in an overload situation the 5A light switch is likely to 'pop' before the 10A fuse/circuit breaker. It could depend on how old the wiring is and how many lights you have on the one circuit but it should work it's just if you are willing to take the risk.

 

I checked the Fibaro Apple HomeKit Single Circuit On/Off Switch and that is showing as 8A continuous which is 80% of the 10A. I think most fuse/circuit breakers are rated like this also i.e. a 10A fuse/circuit breaker is 10A max and usually only 8A continuous. I'm happy to be corrected if I am wrong. 

 

If you are set on Homekit integration Fibaro could be an option, a bit expensive in my opinion and probably not what you are after in terms of an EU style switch but available locally.

 

The key for you I guess is trying to search for 230-240V 10A. 

 

Good luck. 👍

 

 

 

 

 

 


4127 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2514137 28-Jun-2020 20:40
Send private message quote this post

There isn't a technical issue really but there is a liability issue. Any permanently installed electrical device needs and SDOC and for smart devices probably C-Tick (I haven't looked at the regs for a long time).

 

Without an SDOC a sensible electrician won't install it and you could have insurance issues if it caused a fire.

 

 


  #2514143 28-Jun-2020 20:54
Send private message quote this post

Handle9:

 

There isn't a technical issue really but there is a liability issue. Any permanently installed electrical device needs and SDOC and for smart devices probably C-Tick (I haven't looked at the regs for a long time).

 

Without an SDOC a sensible electrician won't install it and you could have insurance issues if it caused a fire.

 

 

 

 

ECP 51 - New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Homeowner/Occupier's Electrical Wiring Work in Domestic Installations (NZECP 51:2004)
If you are the owner of a domestic electrical installation that is for your own private use, you can do your own electrical wiring work. If you not have an appropriate electrical qualification, and you are planning to carry out electrical wiring work, you are required by law to do the work “in a workmanlike manner”, in accordance with this Code, without payment, reward or koha. Only a licensed electrical worker can carry out work on another person’s home or do work for payment, reward or koha.

 

But yes it would be an interesting argument with your insurance if the item you installed was deemed to be at fault.


4127 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2514144 28-Jun-2020 21:00
Send private message quote this post

Zorg2000:

 

Handle9:

 

There isn't a technical issue really but there is a liability issue. Any permanently installed electrical device needs and SDOC and for smart devices probably C-Tick (I haven't looked at the regs for a long time).

 

Without an SDOC a sensible electrician won't install it and you could have insurance issues if it caused a fire.

 

 

 

 

ECP 51 - New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Homeowner/Occupier's Electrical Wiring Work in Domestic Installations (NZECP 51:2004)
If you are the owner of a domestic electrical installation that is for your own private use, you can do your own electrical wiring work. If you not have an appropriate electrical qualification, and you are planning to carry out electrical wiring work, you are required by law to do the work “in a workmanlike manner”, in accordance with this Code, without payment, reward or koha. Only a licensed electrical worker can carry out work on another person’s home or do work for payment, reward or koha.

 

But yes it would be an interesting argument with your insurance if the item you installed was deemed to be at fault.

 

 

Who installs the device is irrelevant - if you can't demonstrate compliance with AS/NZS 3820 (or other relevant standards) it's not legal to install

 

 


224 posts

Master Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2525608 19-Jul-2020 13:54
Send private message quote this post

We don't do the 80% thing here - that's a US rule. If it's a 10A circuit you can load it right up to 10A if you want. Some newer houses will have 6A protected lighting circuits, due to a bit of revised guidance around protecting cable, particularly in thermal insulation.

 

Dimmers usually have a thermal fuse or other systems to cut the load if they overheat, as they're usually only rated for 3-500V - a 10A SSR and heatsink is big. I wouldn't expect that to be the case, or reliable, on a relay device.

 

You will also probably need to cut and patch holes and get EU size boxes, and all that jazz.

 

 

 

'Wall switches' are declared high-risk articles, not merely DMRAs, so an SDoC or demonstrated compliance is not enough. They need to have actually been specifically approved by worksafe or EESS.

 

 


Create new topic




News »

Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51


QNAP integrates Catalyst Cloud Object Storage into Hybrid Backup solution
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:40



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.