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Huskie

125 posts

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#289134 15-Aug-2021 01:52
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Been in helpdesk a couple years now just trying to figure out what I want to do next.

 

I've narrowed down my list to a Cloud Engineer (broad term I know, titles seem to interchange quite a bit between jobs, but I do like the admin/infrastructure/security aspects). I'm not a coder at all, so I definitely won't do very well in DevOps, though open to learning bits here and there as required.

 

I've tried to look at pathways in terms of study but getting a bit overwhelmed and unsure if they are as relevant to the NZ/AU market. 

 

CISSP, CCSP come up often, but when compared to Seek/job market, most companies appear to be after AWS and Azure certs (and rarely Google Cloud).

 

If anyone is already in the industry, would you mind providing some insight?

 

Would it be best to go down the Azure route? Something like the Azure Security Engineer Associate?

 

My company doesn't offer any training incentives so I'll be paying out of pocket and can't afford to do certs that won't help get my foot in the door.


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gzt

gzt
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  #2760303 15-Aug-2021 17:46
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AWS is the market leader by a long way. Datacentre based in Sydney. This is not a problem for most NZ users.

Microsoft is building a datacentre in NZ. It will increase local demand. Microsoft will capture many cloudless current SMBs because it's closer to what they know.

engedib
250 posts

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  #2760305 15-Aug-2021 17:55
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gzt: AWS is the market leader by a long way. Datacentre based in Sydney. This is not a problem for most NZ users.

Microsoft is building a datacentre in NZ. It will increase local demand. Microsoft will capture many cloudless current SMBs because it's closer to what they know.

 

With the Azure Datacentre(s) opening in NZ, I'm predicting a shift from AWS to Azure and also a lot of workloads from the current NZ based IaaS providers will move there.

 

I would start with a couple of Azure exams (AZ-900, AZ-104, AZ-500 and so on), there are a lot of available free training from Microsoft with very good guides, trial Azure accounts with credits.

 

Once a few exams are done apply for a few jobs with updated, cloud focused CV :)


gehenna
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  #2760306 15-Aug-2021 18:02
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Where are you located?



Huskie

125 posts

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  #2760307 15-Aug-2021 18:09
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gehenna: Where are you located?

I'm in Christchurch.

Huskie

125 posts

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  #2760309 15-Aug-2021 18:11
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I would start with a couple of Azure exams (AZ-900, AZ-104, AZ-500 and so on), there are a lot of available free training from Microsoft with very good guides, trial Azure accounts with credits.


Once a few exams are done apply for a few jobs with updated, cloud focused CV :)



I figured this would be the case. I'll get started on the Azure fundamentals and work my way from there.

mulac
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  #2760314 15-Aug-2021 18:28
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Don’t shy away from coding. I don’t think you’ll get away with being a cloud engineer over the coming years without some core programming fundamental knowledge. A lot of the advantages of running workloads on the cloud come through code, like IaC (infrastructure as code).

If you’re going down the Azure route, at least spend a good chunk of time going over above the course requirements for PowerShell. It will make your life better and your employers much better

DjShadow
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  #2760320 15-Aug-2021 18:56
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If you can get on the right mailing list with Microsoft, they tend to send out free invites to their AZ900 (Azure Cloud Fundamentals) course with a free exam




timmmay
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  #2760347 15-Aug-2021 20:52
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I'm a cloud architect, have been for quite a while, I help interview cloud engineers. If you want to be a cloud engineer you will need to write code - infrastructure as code, maybe some python, this and that. Almost everything is done as code in large companies, if you can't learn to code you can't do the job.

 

Industry certificates are key. Azure, AWS, work out what's in demand in your area and specialise if you want to be really good. I've been doing AWS for 5+ years and I learn something new every day. The past few years Azure seemed bigger to me, but the past year or two AWS has made massive gains, particularly in the finance sectors, but in government too. Government uses Azure a lot because they have an existing relationship, M365. Private companies tend to use AWS more. I heard that the government department in charge of cloud and such (GCIO maybe) is asking departments to not all go to one cloud, to avoid a monopoly.

 

I wouldn't give too much weight to Azure building a DC in NZ. AWS in Sydney is fine up to quite a high level of government information and fine for private sector. Banks are fine with AWS Sydney, and there's a Melbourne region coming online at some point.

 

The industry is massive short staffed. Chose your cloud, get certified, learn some code, you can get a job. In AWS the minimum I will interview is AWS Certified with one Associate certificate unless someone has really significant cloud experience. If you can get two certs, or even a professional certificate, you'll do fine. Cloud Guru training, find a site with some sample exams (Brain Cert maybe), it's not difficult if you put in the time to learn.


Huskie

125 posts

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  #2760772 16-Aug-2021 15:47
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timmmay:

 

I'm a cloud architect, have been for quite a while, I help interview cloud engineers. If you want to be a cloud engineer you will need to write code - infrastructure as code, maybe some python, this and that. Almost everything is done as code in large companies, if you can't learn to code you can't do the job.

 

Industry certificates are key. Azure, AWS, work out what's in demand in your area and specialise if you want to be really good. I've been doing AWS for 5+ years and I learn something new every day. The past few years Azure seemed bigger to me, but the past year or two AWS has made massive gains, particularly in the finance sectors, but in government too. Government uses Azure a lot because they have an existing relationship, M365. Private companies tend to use AWS more. I heard that the government department in charge of cloud and such (GCIO maybe) is asking departments to not all go to one cloud, to avoid a monopoly.

 

I wouldn't give too much weight to Azure building a DC in NZ. AWS in Sydney is fine up to quite a high level of government information and fine for private sector. Banks are fine with AWS Sydney, and there's a Melbourne region coming online at some point.

 

The industry is massive short staffed. Chose your cloud, get certified, learn some code, you can get a job. In AWS the minimum I will interview is AWS Certified with one Associate certificate unless someone has really significant cloud experience. If you can get two certs, or even a professional certificate, you'll do fine. Cloud Guru training, find a site with some sample exams (Brain Cert maybe), it's not difficult if you put in the time to learn.

 

 

Appreciate your insight.

 

I don't currently code but I am not opposed to learning. I think I'll start with a couple of Azure certs. While my workplace doesn't offer training, they are MS heavy so once I work my way through a couple, I can ask to see if they need help in any areas to apply my new knowledge as a starting point.


darylblake
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  #2764601 21-Aug-2021 23:57
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At the end of the day this really comes back to what you want to do... 

Ask yourself, what excites you, perhaps its a particular technology or maybe its helping customer solve problems... where do you want to spend your 8-9 hours a day? What do you want to get into. Then browse around the job add and look for what sort of experience is relevant.

If you have a passion for cloud, or networks or engineering etc go learn the skills you want and try to move in that direction. You mentioned that you have not done much software that's totally fine. But I would recommend learning a little bit of basic software languages. Python is probably something pretty useful to have even if you end up doing cloud work. 

You can pretty much teach yourself what you need. 

I do think that more and more stuff is moving into the cloud and datacenter. There is a lot less hand-on-boxes work around now days. But don't let that deter you. 


703

703
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  #2791536 7-Oct-2021 22:37
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Associate level certifications are inadequate to provide you with the skills to be a proper cloud engineer. it gives you grounding but you need to have hands on.

 

I have placed cloud engineers and architects into the organization I work for, and the ones who do well are the ones who have knowledge or experience in all the tooling that goes with cloud too. 


timmmay
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  #2791554 8-Oct-2021 06:38
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Tooling is important. Associate certs by themselves aren't enough to make you a cloud engineer, neither is professional either but gets you closer. Both give you the grounding you need to gain the experience that makes you a cloud engineer.


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