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455 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 115099 13-Mar-2013 20:37
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Thought I'd post this question, both because I want to minimise the time I spend on my roof and because this is probably going to be a job repeated thousands of times with analogue shutdown.

What tools and connectors would be best for the home handyperson to complete the job of removing the old VHF antenna  and bypassing the diplexer?

On my list so far.
  • Can of CRC to loosen up rusty bolts
  • Spanners to undo said rusty bolts
  • Sidecutters
  • Sharp Stanley knife
  • Cellphone to call the other half and confirm the TV still works and depending on patience levels give the UHF antenna a tweak to get the best signal.
  • cable ties - UV rated.
My first stab at what I might use.
  • F-type linear compression tool
  • 2x F-type male RG6 linear compression connectors
  • F-type female to female joiner.  Need to find one rated for outdoors but unsure where to look.
Assumptions
  • House is <10 years old so cable will be gel filled and connection not need waterproofing.
  • Nevertheless will put the join on a loop to stop unnecessary water running down the cable over the join.
  • A cable stripper would be ideal, but with a steady hand, I should be able to cut back the right lenths of the cable using a knife and save tooling up too much for a one-off job.
Am I on the right path here, or is there a better way to tackle the job?

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2076 posts

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  Reply # 781315 13-Mar-2013 21:37
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Looks pretty good, my only thoughts would be
- The assumption that the cable is gel filled for a sub 10 year house might be a tad optimistic, I wouldnt be surprised if it was the thin cheap stuff. And if it is, then your RG6 linear crimps wont work with it
- I wouldnt worry about an outdoors F-type joiner, they all might be. In any case, most of it, including the business ends, is well covered by the RG6 connectors

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  Reply # 781316 13-Mar-2013 21:38
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I will say one thing, get a decent set of coax cable strippers and don't use a knife.
Even a small nick in the centre core can cause reception issues.




 
 
 
 




455 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 128


  Reply # 781339 13-Mar-2013 22:13
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Firstly thanks, this is exactly the kind of feedback I was after.

nickb800: Looks pretty good, my only thoughts would be
- The assumption that the cable is gel filled for a sub 10 year house might be a tad optimistic, I wouldnt be surprised if it was the thin cheap stuff. And if it is, then your RG6 linear crimps wont work with it


I'm pretty sure the cable into the house is good quality and can check it before my mission to the roof.  Is the cable from the antenna to the diplexer likely to be the cheap stuff?  If so I'm assuming I should replace it and not bother trying to terminate it and waterproof the joint.

nickb800:- I wouldnt worry about an outdoors F-type joiner, they all might be. In any case, most of it, including the business ends, is well covered by the RG6 connectors


Cool, I get that there won't be anywhere for water to get in, was just worried about corrosion.  I guess a little surface corrosion wouldn't matter too much anyway.



455 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 128


  Reply # 781342 13-Mar-2013 22:20
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CYaBro: I will say one thing, get a decent set of coax cable strippers and don't use a knife.
Even a small nick in the centre core can cause reception issues.


Thanks.  Is that something I'd notice right away, or would it degrade over time?  If it's the former, 2 or 3 extra connectors and some trial and error would be cheaper option.  As I said this is a one-off job, so if I *need* decent tools, I might as well get in the professionals.

BTW the internal wiring is not that flash anyway.  Uses the splitters where the cable screws straight onto the PCB.  Figured the diplexer will be the same so any job I do will be an improvement.

[edit]  Sorry, I just assumed a cable stripper would be expensive.  Just looked and saw you can get one for $15 from Surplustronics.  May not qualify as decent but got to be better than my knife work :)

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  Reply # 781398 14-Mar-2013 09:20
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It should be the same cable throughout the system, so if you think youve got RG6 then it should be there the whole way through - including antenna-->diplexer

Those cheap cable strippers that you spin around the cable are surprisingly awesome when they are calibrated correctly for the diameter of cable and inner layer. Probably not that durable but saves heaps of time on small tasks like this

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