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Topic # 150370 20-Jul-2014 12:50
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I bought a Hauppauge 1900 last month new.

On some recordings, I've been bothered by the recorded TS files motion artefacts.

Thanks to freeware MediaInfo, I've discovered the Hauppauge 1900 records at least two different resolutions

* 1920 x 1080
* 720 x 576

The scan type is always interlaced.

Interestingly even though the WinTV7 software is terrible to use, it does the best job of hiding the motion artefacts from Hauppauge videos.

Am I correct the Hauppauge capture device is automatically picking the same resolution as Freeview?

In other words the TS video is at 720x576, because Freeview broadcasted at the same resolution?

(I actually called the Hauppauge support number in New York, who told me they weren't familiar with the 1900, and suggested I email Singapore. Singapore never replied.)


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  Reply # 1092451 20-Jul-2014 12:55
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Motion artifacts have nothing to do with Freeview or your DVB-T card, it's the codec and hardware you're using for playback.

As discussed in the other thread you started, a TS file is a raw dump of the Transport Stream, it is in the exact same bitrate and resolution as the channel is broadcast in which is 1080i or 576i depending on the channel.






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  Reply # 1092452 20-Jul-2014 13:00
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I use a Hauppage 2200 and WinTV 7. The 2200 and 1900 are purely HD TV tuners and have no bearing on the resolution. The software (WinTV) decides the resolution and as it is receiving an H264 .ts transport stream it records the resolution as transmitted. HD is recorded as HD and SD as SD. i.e. 1080i or 576i. There are no 1080p transmissions.

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  Reply # 1092456 20-Jul-2014 13:19
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kingdragonfly: [snip]

* 1920 x 1080
* 720 x 576

The scan type is always interlaced.

In other words the TS video is at 720x576, because Freeview broadcasted at the same resolution?


You are recording and playing back precisely what is being transmitted. Nothing less, nothing more.



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  Reply # 1092661 20-Jul-2014 20:30
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I found a flag in XBMC that de-interlaces the video on playback.

I'm guessing WinTV7 is doing the same thing (but not "settable")

It does make it look a little fuzzy, but the motion artefacts are much less noticeable.

Cheers

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  Reply # 1092668 20-Jul-2014 20:44
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You will need to deinterlace unless feeding the signal to a TV (which will accept an interlaced signal).

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  Reply # 1092685 20-Jul-2014 21:10
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kingdragonfly: I found a flag in XBMC that de-interlaces the video on playback.

I'm guessing WinTV7 is doing the same thing (but not "settable")

It does make it look a little fuzzy, but the motion artefacts are much less noticeable.

Cheers


You need to deinterlace all TV you watch as every channel is broadcast interlaced. This setting will be in the codec you are using for video playback.

Different versions of Windows, video codecs, and more important your video hardware make a significant difference in the quality of video. Without knowing anything about your setup it's not really possible to offer any advice.







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  Reply # 1092688 20-Jul-2014 21:18
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RunningMan: You will need to deinterlace unless feeding the signal to a TV (which will accept an interlaced signal).


Even if its going to a TV which will deinterlace, all the processing done beforehand will look like crap if its done without deinterlacing.

Im yet to see a PC solution that can adiquitely output interlaced video that a TV can deinterlace to something acceptable.




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