Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




1431 posts

Uber Geek


#265495 24-Jan-2020 12:26
Send private message

A friend recently wanted to purchase Microsoft Office and was told that it's now only available on a yearly subscription, is that correct? Anyway, he downloaded Office to his computer and found that all the default settings for Word etc required him to use "OneDrive" storage instead of being able to save directly to his hard drives, as he had previously done. After a while, he managed to work out how to save his files directly to hard drives without using "OneDrive", but it seems that Microsoft don't really want you to do this (perhaps I'm wrong)?

 

I have Adobe Photoshop and this clearly and immediately gives you the option of either saving on their cloud or direct to your hard drive. But, I'm interested to know whether you use clouds to back-up your data and whether you think they're secure enough for your confidential files?

 

There are always reports of hackers getting into so-called secure systems, so I'm a bit hesitant to use clouds, but others I've talked to don't have any worries about the security of their cloud data. Can anyone get access to peoples' confidential files that they store on clouds, particularly if there was a legal case involving a person's online activities?

 

Thanks for your views on this.

 

 

 

 


Create new topic
16107 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2405781 24-Jan-2020 12:45
Send private message

You can save to your computer, at least in my version of office. Just click into save options -> browse -> find your hard drive.

 

Cloud is judged sufficiently secure for paranoid government and corporate files by their security teams, when properly configured, so it's likely secure enough for personal files. AWS systems do not allow them to decrypt files that are encrypted by their KMS service, and if you're paranoid you can encrypt on your computer before you upload them - just don't lose the encryption key.


3104 posts

Uber Geek


  #2406120 24-Jan-2020 15:19
Send private message

There are products that will backup those cloud storage sites to another cloud if you need to.
Most businesses would/should do this.




Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler


 
 
 
 


xpd

Budget Gamer
10607 posts

Uber Geek

Mod Emeritus
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2406145 24-Jan-2020 16:17
Send private message

Regardless of how/where you store your files, always have an offline backup. Personally, I store very little online these days, as I have a home server which is backed up to a NAS, as well as an external drive every so often.

 

 





XPD^ / DemiseNZ

 

Blog         Free Games        Twitter

 

My TradeMe Goodies

 

Disclaimer - It wasn't me, the dog ate my keyboard, my account was hacked, I was drunk, ALIENS.


2165 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2406149 24-Jan-2020 16:35
Send private message

frednz:

 

After a while, he managed to work out how to save his files directly to hard drives without using "OneDrive", but it seems that Microsoft don't really want you to do this (perhaps I'm wrong)?

 

 

It is not difficult to change - there are many tutorials on how to do this and the technology has been around for over a decade. It is only a default setting - Microsoft have not hidden it away in the registry.

 

OneDrive is a really useful feature but it is not a complete solution to securing your data.

 

I recommend having backups on three different media which should be in three different locations. Many people underestimate the likelihood of multiple failures occurring before the first failure is resolved. Many owners of RAID systems have not realised how vulnerable they are to coincidental failures. I even had all three of my computers die within a week.

 

If you use USB sticks then that means three different USB sticks stored in three different locations. I have OneDrive, various external HDD backups in two locations, and various backups on USB sticks.

 

 

 

Regarding legal access to your data. The best way to protect it is to encrypt it so nobody can read it even if they get access to your storage device.




1431 posts

Uber Geek


  #2406391 25-Jan-2020 07:29
Send private message

Hammerer:

 

frednz:

 

After a while, he managed to work out how to save his files directly to hard drives without using "OneDrive", but it seems that Microsoft don't really want you to do this (perhaps I'm wrong)?

 

 

It is not difficult to change - there are many tutorials on how to do this and the technology has been around for over a decade. It is only a default setting - Microsoft have not hidden it away in the registry.

 

OneDrive is a really useful feature but it is not a complete solution to securing your data.

 

I recommend having backups on three different media which should be in three different locations. Many people underestimate the likelihood of multiple failures occurring before the first failure is resolved. Many owners of RAID systems have not realised how vulnerable they are to coincidental failures. I even had all three of my computers die within a week.

 

If you use USB sticks then that means three different USB sticks stored in three different locations. I have OneDrive, various external HDD backups in two locations, and various backups on USB sticks.

 

 

 

Regarding legal access to your data. The best way to protect it is to encrypt it so nobody can read it even if they get access to your storage device.

 

 

Thanks, I agree that just storing data to a cloud isn't adequate and that saving to at least two hard drives in two locations is an excellent approach. Now, if everyone did this we wouldn't hear as many stories about people who lose data through theft, fires and other disasters. I wonder if many people encrypt their data before uploading to a cloud or hard drives? I need to investigate this option as I'm still not that comfortable with storing financial and other confidential data on a cloud. What encryption method is recommended?


1290 posts

Uber Geek


  #2406460 25-Jan-2020 09:02
Send private message

frednz:

 

I wonder if many people encrypt their data before uploading to a cloud or hard drives? I need to investigate this option as I'm still not that comfortable with storing financial and other confidential data on a cloud. What encryption method is recommended?

 

 

I particularly like rclone as it is command line based and runs on everything. I backup daily to Google Drive from my Synology NASs and use a script to backup source code to OneDrive when I've finished coding for the day.

 

If you want version control etc., you have to do that manually. E.g. I keep an up to date mirror and 28 source code revisions by date.

 

You can mount drives via rclone as well, but I'm not sure if you can do so on Windows. You can set them up to be accessible via HTTP and other protocols however.


1463 posts

Uber Geek


  #2406463 25-Jan-2020 09:23
Send private message

There often is a difference between using a business and consumer versions of various cloud products and one should be aware of this when it comes to security. An example is OneDrive for Business vs normal OneDrive.

 

also, a business would perform a cloud risk assessment, have a risk strategy, be compliant with various  legislation such as gpdr and would have various data retention and backup policies.

 

 

 

From the website, it still looks like office has a monthly subscription.

 

 

 

 





Software Engineer
   (the practice of real science, engineering and management)


 
 
 
 


16107 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2406482 25-Jan-2020 10:24
Send private message

I don't encrypt before sending financial data to Amazon S3, but it is encrypted by aws. They have zetabytes of data, needle in a haystack, and IMHO it's sufficiently secure.



1431 posts

Uber Geek


  #2406790 25-Jan-2020 17:09
Send private message

frednz:

 

A friend recently wanted to purchase Microsoft Office and was told that it's now only available on a yearly subscription, is that correct?

 

 

Just to correct the above, you can buy a one-off one-user "permanent" copy of Microsoft Office for $239. The problem with this is that it can't be updated. You can buy this from places like Harvey Norman and get a product key, or I guess you could also buy it online.

 

If you want a copy of Office that can be updated regularly, a single-user subscription costs $120 per year and a 5-user subscription costs $165 per year.

 

I'm not sure whether there are enough worthwhile updates to warrant paying an annual subscription, but I suppose business users would go for this option?


1290 posts

Uber Geek


  #2406792 25-Jan-2020 17:12
Send private message

frednz:

 

I'm not sure whether there are enough worthwhile updates to warrant paying an annual subscription, but I suppose business users would go for this option?

 

 

Word 2.0C still would do everything I required, other than opening docx files, so not really. You get 1TB on OneDrive per user to sweeten the deal.

 

I wouldn't bother and just use LibreOffice, if not for the fact that another family member paid for it.


16107 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2406801 25-Jan-2020 17:31
Send private message

Word 2007 still works great. It has all the features of the latest Office 365 version that I use at work, it just looks a bit uglier.


Create new topic





Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Chorus completes the build and commissioning of two new core Ethernet switches
Posted 8-Jul-2020 09:48


National Institute for Health Innovation develops treatment app for gambling
Posted 6-Jul-2020 16:25


Nokia 2.3 to be available in New Zealand
Posted 6-Jul-2020 12:30


Menulog change colours as parent company merges with Dutch food delivery service
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:53


Techweek2020 goes digital to make it easier for Kiwis to connect and learn
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:48


Catalyst Cloud launches new Solutions Hub to support their kiwi Partners and Customers
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:44


Microsoft to help New Zealand job seekers acquire new digital skills needed for the COVID-19 economy
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:41


Hewlett Packard Enterprise introduces new HPE GreenLake cloud services
Posted 24-Jun-2020 08:07


New cloud data protection services from Hewlett Packard Enterprise
Posted 24-Jun-2020 07:58


Hewlett Packard Enterprise unveils HPE Ezmeral, new software portfolio and brand
Posted 24-Jun-2020 07:10


Apple reveals new developer technologies to foster the next generation of apps
Posted 23-Jun-2020 15:30


Poly introduces solutions for Microsoft Teams Rooms
Posted 23-Jun-2020 15:14


Lenovo launches new ThinkPad P Series mobile workstations
Posted 23-Jun-2020 09:17


Lenovo brings Linux certification to ThinkPad and ThinkStation Workstation portfolio
Posted 23-Jun-2020 08:56


Apple introduces new features for iPhone iOS14 and iPadOS 14
Posted 23-Jun-2020 08:28



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.