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Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 191992 23-Feb-2016 12:59
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Hi there, looking to put an induction cooktop in, it is 30A 7.2KW. How much would i be looking for to redo the fuse etc?
The cable that is currently attached is the white TPS with markings of 600/1000v, it's pretty thick. Will this wire need replacing as well as the circuit breaker or just the CB?
I've heard people saying that you can just connect it to a 20A and ensure you don't use all elements at full power, doesn't sound right but understand it. Would like to do it the right way though.

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  Reply # 1497811 23-Feb-2016 13:07
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A qualified sparky is your best bet.




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1497813 23-Feb-2016 13:08
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DarthKermit:

A qualified sparky is your best bet.



I know there are a couple on here which will give me an idea before wasting a sparky's time with questions over the phone or coming to the house etc.

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1497835 23-Feb-2016 13:53
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Yes, unless you can verify the cable size and that this corresponds to being suitable for the 32A MCB (a 6mm2 is normally sufficient, but length of cable run also needs to be factored in to the calculation), you may need to replace both the cable and MCB.

 

As this involves permanent wiring, and wiring inside the distribution board, you will need a sparky to carry out the work.





Michael Skyrme - Instrumentation & Controls

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  Reply # 1497838 23-Feb-2016 13:57
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I'm sure this is terribly wrong for all kinds of reasons, but you could just connect two 20-amp circuits in parallel. Or not?

 

 

 

Mod (N8) edit: DO NOT TRY THE ABOVE.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1497852 23-Feb-2016 14:12
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Rikkitic:

 

I'm sure this is terribly wrong for all kinds of reasons, but you could just connect two 20-amp circuits in parallel. Or not?

 

 

 

 

 

 

**DANGER*          *DO NOT TRY THE ABOVE ADVICE**

 

 

 

2 x 20A circuits run in parallel does not equal 40A, it's way more and will lead to all kinds of other problems.

 

 

 

Get suitable advice from an electrician, cable size, cable length, loading and maximum demand all have a bearing on what can and can't be done, none of which can be figured out without a site visit.

 

 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1497863 23-Feb-2016 14:34
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gregmcc:

Rikkitic:


I'm sure this is terribly wrong for all kinds of reasons, but you could just connect two 20-amp circuits in parallel. Or not?


 



 


**DANGER*          *DO NOT TRY THE ABOVE ADVICE**


 


2 x 20A circuits run in parallel does not equal 40A, it's way more and will lead to all kinds of other problems.


 


Get suitable advice from an electrician, cable size, cable length, loading and maximum demand all have a bearing on what can and can't be done, none of which can be figured out without a site visit.


 



Cheers for that, will give someone a ring. Will i be charged for them to come out and do a quote on what has to be done?

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  Reply # 1497865 23-Feb-2016 14:38
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depends on the company, some will some wont, ask on the phone its free :)


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  Reply # 1497873 23-Feb-2016 14:46
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Rikkitic:

 

I'm sure this is terribly wrong for all kinds of reasons, but you could just connect two 20-amp circuits in parallel. Or not?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet Baby Jeebus, this one needs to be removed from the thread before someone takes it on board....

 

Depending on the age of your house, you may need the wiring replaced if its under the required diameter for your house. As others have said above.

 

Its a safety thing ensuring you don't die or burn your house down, get it done right first time

 

 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1497921 23-Feb-2016 16:00
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I reckon its about 10 meters at the most to the board. house built in 2003.

Here are some pics

Click to see full size

Click to see full size


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  Reply # 1497928 23-Feb-2016 16:16
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get an electrician


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  Reply # 1497964 23-Feb-2016 17:05
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Fabian: I reckon its about 10 meters at the most to the board. house built in 2003.

Here are some pics

Click to see full size

Click to see full size

 

 

 

the other side of the cable has the size and type rating on it. Hard to tell from that picture the size, but get an electrician

 

 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1497965 23-Feb-2016 17:06
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Gencalc tells me that a 4mm2 TPS is good for 30A over 10 metres so you may be okay with the wiring you have as most stoves run in at least 4mm2 cable.

 

But you must get an electrician to check the wiring, circuit breaker and to connect it. You don't want to burn you house down!


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1505275 2-Mar-2016 23:08
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You can connect the cooktop to the wall providing you know how to. But you cannot replace a MCB on the panel , that is the law. So no matter what you need a sparky. 


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