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Topic # 143866 30-Apr-2014 08:21
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My son is at the age where he is learning to drive.  Before we start forking out lots of dollars on 'proper' driving lessons I will be having a few sessions with him to learn starting and stopping, basic car handling skills, etc. I want to avoid teaching him any bad habits, and I'm keen to hear people's thoughts on what's the correct way to turn the steering wheel.  I was taught 30 or so years ago to go 'arm-over-arm' but the alternative is to do the 'shuffle' ( this seemed to be the way people were being taught in the UK when I got there in the early 90's). Which is considered the right way to do it these days?





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  Reply # 1033622 30-Apr-2014 08:29
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No matter what you teach him soon after it will be one hand on the steering wheel and the other hanging out car window or playing with radio

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  Reply # 1033623 30-Apr-2014 08:31
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With thanks to Google - seems to be Irish, but also seems to be solid advice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lxa6lF-l13c 



Also thanking Google, an NZ resource that cites the same method:

http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/driving-skill-syllabus/lesson-4.html

NZ method also seems to talk about hand-over-hand.

I have my driving skills re-assessed fairly often and the push-pull method tends to be my 'fall back' despite any other bad habits I may have developed.

(Hand over hand interests me in that there are many schools of thought that suggest crossing your arms is a bad thing...)




 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1033631 30-Apr-2014 08:40
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I dont drive much anymore ... but after a quick "drive" in the office at my desk, it came to me and it depends on 2 things for me :

1) The vehicles ability to turn (does it have power steering and is it "light" or "heavy")
2) The sort of turn I need to make.

For a shallow turn in a vehicle with good handling and "light" on the steering wheel, Ill just do the "shuffle" method, but for deeper turns Ill do hand over hand.

If the vehicle is larger and has "heavy" steering , Ill tend to do hand over hand every time, just to ensure the wheel is getting the turn angle I require.




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  Reply # 1033632 30-Apr-2014 08:41
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should never cross your hands, im pretty sure shuffling is the preferred method as you pretty much always have 2 hands on the wheel

my wife was told off for doing hand over hand by the instructor



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  Reply # 1033645 30-Apr-2014 08:56
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Thanks all
BlakJak: With thanks to Google - seems to be Irish, but also seems to be solid advice.

That would take some getting used to, look s unnatural to me but I guess if you learn that way from the start


BlakJak:
Also thanking Google, an NZ resource that cites the same method:

http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/driving-skill-syllabus/lesson-4.html

NZ method also seems to talk about hand-over-hand.

Good link thank you.  Interesting that both methods are acceptable here, although Jase's post suggests hand-over-hand is frowned upon.

BlakJak:
I have my driving skills re-assessed fairly often ...

me too... for the last 20 years...I still love her dearly though







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  Reply # 1033646 30-Apr-2014 08:57
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I've never been 'taught' any proper way, I tend to do hand over hand. Never was told off during my restricted & full for doing it, never had any problems.




 


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  Reply # 1033676 30-Apr-2014 09:27
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floydbloke: My son is at the age where he is learning to drive.

More than likely he has learned to drive already by watching you for many years. Prepare for the fact it could be difficult to retrain him out of any habits you have already taught him ; ).

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  Reply # 1033692 30-Apr-2014 09:40
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Your arms should not cross while steering. Some testers will now mark you down for doing so, and it greatly reduces your control and reactive options if something occurs while doing so. This change in teaching style appeared to coincide with the widespread introduction of power steering.




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  Reply # 1033709 30-Apr-2014 09:50
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The theory is when driving both hands should be on the wheel at the 10 and 2 positions so the sliding grip method is the best to maintain this




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  Reply # 1033713 30-Apr-2014 09:56
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sliding your hands isnt acceptable either :) you must shuffle them

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  Reply # 1033768 30-Apr-2014 10:22
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I was taught hand over hand when making a turn, but shuffling for correcting direction then returning to 10 and 2 by my instructor.  He said the option you feel most comfortable with is the safest option.

Shuffling in our station wagon is out of the question.  The steering is so heavy, it's almost as if there is no power steering.  My whole arm is required to turn the steering wheel.  When correcting at speed, it's fine.  letting the wheel slip after a u-turn for example is fine for me since it does it so slowly.

The Holden Astra I drive is different.  It has incredibly light steering and letting the wheel slip after a u-turn has surprised me a few times.  So in order to find the method most comfortable for you, the vehicle's behavior must be studied first.





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  Reply # 1033792 30-Apr-2014 10:30
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there is no right way, each have pros and cons, depending on level of skill/reaction/natural talent/speed of vehicle.

for example one person i knew would shuffle shuffle - for one whole year when she turned LEFT she ends up in the other lane. sometimes going at 40kph! I still don't know how we are still alive today.

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  Reply # 1033804 30-Apr-2014 10:38
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I had an XD 4.1 Ford Falcon as a company car back in the early '80s.  The tight-as CEO insisted that only people at his elevated position in the pecking-order got power-steering as an option.  I had one of those handles attached to the steering wheel to assist in turning the wheel when parking - lord knows how many turns it was lock to lock.  Thank goodness they don't make cars like that any more.
My son has had driving lessons, where the instructor insisted that the 10 to 2 hand position on the wheel is incorrect, and that it should be 11 to 1.  This feels dangerous/uncomfortable to me - but I can't argue against the "expert advice" received.

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  Reply # 1033812 30-Apr-2014 10:42
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10 and 2 has always been the recommended resting position as far as I can remember.  it prepares you for evasive action for both directions.  I guess 11 and 1 does too.

The usual way I see people doing it is right hand 3 o'clock, elbow on door card sill and left hand on gear knob.





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  Reply # 1033817 30-Apr-2014 10:48
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The BEST way to learn is to cross over your arm.






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