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Glurp
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Topic # 204803 18-Oct-2016 13:38
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Acer is not considered a quality brand but it is also not bottom of the barrel and it sells a lot of computers. I bought an Aspire V3 112p notebook after carefully researching my requirements and budget. It had exactly the features I wanted and the price was right.

 

A purchase like this is a bit like getting a new toy. There is a sense of excited anticipation when it arrives. You want to enjoy it and you want to like it.

 

At first I did. It was exactly what I wanted. It had some neat features. The battery life was amazing compared to anything I had experienced before.

 

After a couple of months the trackpad started randomly freezing. It was annoying and disappointing, but at first it didn’t happen too frequently and it was not a deal breaker. I soon discovered that a freeze could be fixed by toggling Fn-F7. Over time it got steadily worse and I was having to constantly hit the F7 key. I googled the issue and discovered that many people were experiencing it across a range of Acer laptops. There were threads about it on the Acer support site but no real support or even acknowledgement of the problem from Acer. Their only response was advice to take the computer to their repair service. Several people did but the ‘repair’ seems to have mainly consisted of reinstalling Windows, which didn’t fix anything. Since I don’t live near an Acer service centre and didn’t want to send the computer away, I was reluctant to try this.

 

Eventually I found a few scattered posts from people who said the problem was a bad ground connection and could easily be fixed. I was reluctant to try this since the computer was new and I couldn’t be certain it would actually work, but after the warranty period expired, and with the problem getting worse, I finally decided to bite the bullet. With the help of on-line disassembly instructions, I reluctantly removed the back cover and battery, which turned out to be surprisingly simple and straightforward, and inspected the back of the trackpad.

 

There are two connecting points on either side for ground straps but only one is used. The connection is not soldered, but made with conductive adhesive which many people have pointed out does not create a good connection and deteriorates over time. Following the suggestions, I carefully (watching the heat) soldered a braided earth wire to the trackpad ground, then soldered it to the metal surround that the other ground cable was glued to, then continued it to the main board and soldered it to an earth connection there and reassembled the computer.

 

Since I made the repair the trackpad hasn’t frozen once. Only time will tell if it is truly fixed, but it does seem that this has done the trick. I am now filled with two emotions: huge relief and enormous anger. I am relieved that this extremely irritating problem was so easily fixable after suffering from it for nearly a year, and that I was able to fix it. But I am equally angry that Acer let this stupidity happen, and then refused to own it. The fix took all of 30 seconds. It was so easy, and also such basic, elementary good practice electronics. You make a good, reliable connection by soldering it, not by sticking it with an adhesive conductor. How many micro-cents did they shave off assembly cost by taking this sloppy shortcut? How hard can it be to solder a single wire? How many customers and how much goodwill has this idiocy cost them? I for one will never buy another Acer product.

 

 





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  Reply # 1652860 18-Oct-2016 13:54
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One bad design decision does not equate to a bad manufacturer.  However I've noted a pattern of IMHO poor build quality over the years.

 

Your rant reminded me of my rant a couple of years ago about Dell deliberately disabling SMART warnings in the BIOS of their computers.  I avoid both brands.  And Lenovo for their dubious software.





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  Reply # 1652895 18-Oct-2016 14:15
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Dynamic:

 

One bad design decision does not equate to a bad manufacturer.  However I've noted a pattern of IMHO poor build quality over the years.

 

Your rant reminded me of my rant a couple of years ago about Dell deliberately disabling SMART warnings in the BIOS of their computers.  I avoid both brands.  And Lenovo for their dubious software.

 

 

The problem is most of the big OEMs have a black mark of some description, I guess it just depends how egregious it is (Lenovo rootkit tactic being an instant writeoff for me!).

 

My current thinking is just to ignore the cheapest product lines and consider the brand on their mid range+ gear.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1653008 18-Oct-2016 15:41
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Good fix!

Rikkitic: It had exactly the features I wanted and the price was right.


Yes, they are very very competitive on price. Imho they miss the quality mark now and then because of that. The element of risk is present.

They have also delivered some excellent low price products.

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  Reply # 1653220 19-Oct-2016 00:50
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Rikkitic:

 

Acer is not considered a quality brand but it is also not bottom of the barrel and it sells a lot of computers.

 

 

As far as "major brands" go, Acer is the absolute bottom of the barrel. I would take virtually anything over an Acer if given the choice. 

 

 





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  Reply # 1653340 19-Oct-2016 09:50
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I would take an Acer over a Dell.

 

 

 

 





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  Reply # 1653352 19-Oct-2016 10:19
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Rikkitic:

 

I would take an Acer over a Dell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same, but I'd almost consider an abacus over both of them :) 

 

Good on you for your DIY approach, though as I started to read the post I had serious misgivings about the outcome. 

 

All brands are capable of design flaws, though in my experience HP Business grade machines whilst being a little more expensive and considerably less bells and whistles than a consumer grade device, have less than others. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1653354 19-Oct-2016 10:25
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I wouldn't.. at least Dell have some semblance of enterprise grade support. 





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  Reply # 1653355 19-Oct-2016 10:25
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HP used to be one of the best, but I'm not sure what the ownership changes have done to it.

 

 





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  Reply # 1653361 19-Oct-2016 10:30
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Rikkitic:

 

HP used to be one of the best, but I'm not sure what the ownership changes have done to it.

 

 

HP Enterprise & Commercial gear continues to work beautifully and reliably for us and clients.  Consumer-level stuff we don't touch.





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  Reply # 1653367 19-Oct-2016 10:37
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Rikkitic:

 

HP used to be one of the best, but I'm not sure what the ownership changes have done to it.

 

 

 

 

Surprisingly, it's one of the few mergers that has been overall fairly positive. Support was pretty poor when they outsourced to India, but to be fair that has improved out of sight now.

 

 




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  Reply # 1653388 19-Oct-2016 10:53
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Lias:

 

I wouldn't.. at least Dell have some semblance of enterprise grade support. 

 

 

I have a friend who is one of those people who can’t cope with anything electronic. He is better now, as devices have become more idiot-proof, but several years ago he had to have a PC for his business and he bought a Dell because he didn’t know better and it was probably the first thing he saw on the shelf. Because I knew more about computers than he did (a monkey would have known more), and because I didn’t go berserk every time it wouldn’t do what it was supposed to, I became his computer support person. 

 

That Dell was the worst pile of crap I have ever seen. It took cheap and nasty to a whole new low. Everything about it screamed flimsy and poor quality. In a little over a year, just after the warranty expired, the keyboard died. Then the monitor. Then the PSU. Then the motherboard. They all really died, nothing small and fixable, but total failure. 

 

This really caused my friend serious problems because he found it too challenging to make back-ups, and there was a lot of essential business stuff on the computer. I had an old HP that was really old, I think a Pentium II or something like that. I had used it for years then upgraded but it still worked perfectly. My friend didn’t need anything fancy, just a functioning PC, so I gave him the HP. Dell, being the useless crap company it is, had system locked the hard drive to the computer so the antique Win 95 business software my friend was running that was absolutely essential and irreplaceable, would not run on the HP. So I had to break the system lock to get the drive to boot, but eventually I got it all working.  That HP was already outmoded when I gave it to my friend, but he happily used it for another 10 years and it never had a single hiccup. It still works fine though it isn’t used any longer. It probably belongs in a museum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





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  Reply # 1653472 19-Oct-2016 12:29
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networkn:

 

Rikkitic:

 

I would take an Acer over a Dell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same, but I'd almost consider an abacus over both of them :) 

 

Good on you for your DIY approach, though as I started to read the post I had serious misgivings about the outcome. 

 

All brands are capable of design flaws, though in my experience HP Business grade machines whilst being a little more expensive and considerably less bells and whistles than a consumer grade device, have less than others. 

 

 

 

 

There was a huge amount of HP laptops that had an issue with motherboards cracking shortly out of warranty a few years ago, as they were business machines used for business HP basically told people to stick it and would not replace or repair.

 

So as stated each brand/model can have issues.


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  Reply # 1653480 19-Oct-2016 12:42
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I have owned several Dell machines and purchased and ran 1000's in enterprise. I have only had minor issues. With the corporate ones we had a batch that experienced HDD failure, Dell sent us a bulk supply of HDD's which we swapped out and that's about it. We had other minor issues that would be inline with industry averages. At home I have had no issues and I am writing this post on a Dell laptop. I had a Dell desk top for 10 years that used as a home server and just recently dumped it.

 

I had Acer corporate Laptops for a short period and they were a disaster.

 

As for HP, their enterprise machines are OK their consumer have had poor reputations over the years but the latest bred since the split seem to be more reliable.





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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

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The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1653492 19-Oct-2016 12:53
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Rikkitic:

 

Lias:

 

I wouldn't.. at least Dell have some semblance of enterprise grade support. 

 

 

I have a friend who is one of those people who can’t cope with anything electronic. He is better now, as devices have become more idiot-proof, but several years ago he had to have a PC for his business and he bought a Dell because he didn’t know better and it was probably the first thing he saw on the shelf. Because I knew more about computers than he did (a monkey would have known more), and because I didn’t go berserk every time it wouldn’t do what it was supposed to, I became his computer support person. 

 

That Dell was the worst pile of crap I have ever seen. It took cheap and nasty to a whole new low. Everything about it screamed flimsy and poor quality. In a little over a year, just after the warranty expired, the keyboard died. Then the monitor. Then the PSU. Then the motherboard. They all really died, nothing small and fixable, but total failure. 

 

This really caused my friend serious problems because he found it too challenging to make back-ups, and there was a lot of essential business stuff on the computer. I had an old HP that was really old, I think a Pentium II or something like that. I had used it for years then upgraded but it still worked perfectly. My friend didn’t need anything fancy, just a functioning PC, so I gave him the HP. Dell, being the useless crap company it is, had system locked the hard drive to the computer so the antique Win 95 business software my friend was running that was absolutely essential and irreplaceable, would not run on the HP. So I had to break the system lock to get the drive to boot, but eventually I got it all working.  That HP was already outmoded when I gave it to my friend, but he happily used it for another 10 years and it never had a single hiccup. It still works fine though it isn’t used any longer. It probably belongs in a museum.

 

 

 

Without trying to suggest that Dell are a bastion of great products, one bad computer does not a terrible brand make. 

 

I've deployed and supported thousands of PC's over the years, which gives me a fairly decent insight into both the build quality, and support quality of various brands. My personal ranking of the top selling brands is HP -> Lenovo -> Dell -> Acer, with HP well in front, and Acer last by a long way.

 

 





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  Reply # 1653501 19-Oct-2016 12:56
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dickytim:

 

There was a huge amount of HP laptops that had an issue with motherboards cracking shortly out of warranty a few years ago, as they were business machines used for business HP basically told people to stick it and would not replace or repair.

 

So as stated each brand/model can have issues.

 

 

That's rare for HP, but you're absolutely right that it does happen, any company can have a bad product release. Toshiba who are traditionally considered one of the best laptop manufacturers have released a couple of absolute dogs over the years (in business grade gear). I'd still rate HP and Toshiba as the two best laptop brands thou :-)

 

 

 

 

 

 





Information wants to be free. The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.


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