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Topic # 115728 4-Apr-2013 17:14
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So...I have been thinking (and that is often a dangerous activity fraught with misadventure).

With UFB (Fibre) being rolled out (now available in my street), does this mean that I will theoretically start to see faster speeds on my copper connection as people migrate to fibre and leave me with all the bandwidth (I'm picturing myself as Wall-E roaming the post-apocolyptic wasteland that is suburban Albany).

It's a sound theory in my age-addled brain...am I right or am I horribly mistaken in thinking that less traffic equals (some) increased speed?

I know it's not going to happen overnight, but surely, in the words of our dear Rachel Hunter, it WILL happen?




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  Reply # 793350 4-Apr-2013 17:14
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Hello... Our robot found some keywords in your post, so here is an automated reply with some important things to note regarding broadband speeds.

 



 

If you are posting regarding DSL speeds please check that

 



 

- you have reset your modem and router

 


 

- your PC (or other PCs in your LAN) is not downloading large files when you are testing

 

- you are not being throttled by your ISP due to going over the monthly cap

 


 

- your tests are always done on an ethernet connection to the router - do not use wireless for testing

 


 

- you read this topic and follow the instructions there.

 



 

Make sure you provide information for other users to help you. If you have not already done it, please EDIT your post and add this now:

 



 

- Your ISP and plan

 


 

- Type of connection (ADSL, ADSL2, VDSL)

 


 

- Your modem DSL stats (do not worry about posting Speedtest, we need sync rate, attenuation and noise margin)

 


 

- Your general location (or street)

 


 

- If you are rural or urban

 


 

- If you know your connection is to an exchange, cabinet or conklin

 


 

- If your connection is to a ULL or wholesale service

 


 

- If you have done an isolation test as per the link above

 



 

Most of the problems with speed are likely to be related to internal wiring issues. Read this discussion to find out more about this. Your ISP is not intentionally slowing you down today (unless you are on a managed plan). Also if this is the school holidays it's likely you will notice slower than usual speed due to more users online.

 



 

A master splitter is required for VDSL2 and in most cases will improve speeds on DSL connections. Regular disconnections can be a monitored alarm or a set top box trying to connect. If there's an alarm connected to your line even if you don't have an alarm contract it may still try to connect so it's worth checking.

 



 

I recommend you read these two blog posts:

 



 

- Is your premises phone wiring impacting your broadband performance? (very technical)

 


 

- Are you receiving a substandard ULL ADSL2+ connection from your ISP?




I am the Geekzone Robot and I am here to help. I am from the Internet. I do not interact. Do not expect other replies from me.





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  Reply # 793354 4-Apr-2013 17:15
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Thanks, Peter. Interesting input there.

You must be a robot...




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  Reply # 793367 4-Apr-2013 17:42
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Handsomedan: So...I have been thinking (and that is often a dangerous activity fraught with misadventure).

With UFB (Fibre) being rolled out (now available in my street), does this mean that I will theoretically start to see faster speeds on my copper connection as people migrate to fibre and leave me with all the bandwidth (I'm picturing myself as Wall-E roaming the post-apocolyptic wasteland that is suburban Albany).

It's a sound theory in my age-addled brain...am I right or am I horribly mistaken in thinking that less traffic equals (some) increased speed?

I know it's not going to happen overnight, but surely, in the words of our dear Rachel Hunter, it WILL happen?


I'm going to say in theory, yes you should but in practice you'll probably find the backhaul capacity for your copper connection being reduced as demand for fibre increases and resources are re-allocated.

Probably you'll get some increase, then some decrease in waves as they juggle these things I would expect.

But that's just a guess - anyone else?

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  Reply # 793371 4-Apr-2013 17:51
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I think the real question here is why arent you signed up on fibre if its available?

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  Reply # 793375 4-Apr-2013 17:55
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PaulBrislen: I'm going to say in theory, yes you should but in practice you'll probably find the backhaul capacity for your copper connection being reduced as demand for fibre increases and resources are re-allocated.

Probably you'll get some increase, then some decrease in waves as they juggle these things I would expect.

But that's just a guess - anyone else?


There is a chance that you'll see some change in speed as more and more people stop using the copper as there won't be as much cross talk.

However, I suspect that most people would find more gain by just purchasing a new, good quality, modem and making sure they've got a proper filter set up (see the endless house wiring threads).

The NGN cabinets have two 10Gbit fibre running to them, so I very much doubt that you'll see any difference in backhaul capacity issues as each cabinet only has ~300 subs, do the math.

The next contention point is the hand over from Chorus to the I/RSP.  I would expect that Chorus are consolidating hand overs and wholesalers will be doing further consilidation, so I doubt we're going to see much impact no mater what happens there, other than more NNI capacity being purchased by providers as they get more UFB customers on line. 

Having said that, as I understand it, NNI ports are ~$400 a month for 1Gbit.  In Australia, ISPs are only purchasing 200Mbit CVC hand over to service 100mbit customers, so 1Gbit really is more than enough to manage quite a load of customers.

A bigger issue might be what's going on inside the ISP.  How many will keep running the same DSL core infrastructure with 30/10 and 100/50 pipes hitting them?  How many ISPs have 200mbit of up stream capacity?

For large providers like Telecom, Vodafone, Snap, CallPlus and Orcon I doubt that this is going to be to much of an issue. 

I wonder if it will be more of an issue for the smaller guys?






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  Reply # 793409 4-Apr-2013 19:34
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fellaintga: I think the real question here is why arent you signed up on fibre if its available?

Cost vs return.

Right now my modem is a slow one and my usage is such that a Fibre plan would be less than optimal.




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  Reply # 793410 4-Apr-2013 19:34
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The simplest answer to this is a big "NO".


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  Reply # 793486 4-Apr-2013 20:49
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Well, you may eventually see less congestion on the wires to the exchange/cabinet but the congestion points are currently back haul to your ISP and international bandwidth from ISP to the internet so I'd imagine no change will result.

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  Reply # 793501 4-Apr-2013 21:14
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sbiddle: The simplest answer to this is a big "NO".



Disagree with that. Whenever there is a power outage so almost all the connections around here are knocked off I see my ADSL go from 13-14 up to 20 meg, the VDSL from 23 to around 30.

As soon as the power came back, noise margen plummeted. ADSL kept working at a 0dB margin. VDSL was dead till I resynced it and it was back at the usual speeds.

I get a 2 meg difference between a morning DSL sync and an evening DSL sync. Less users will mean less crosstalk on crap copper, which seems to be the biggest killer of my VDSL thruput. ADSL less so.

I seem to recall grabbing some screenshots last powercut, but we are heading into winter so there will be plenty of opportunities to get some more soon enough.




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