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211 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 179412 7-Sep-2015 19:07
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Normally I would think a quality product will be backed with nicer warranty, especially when manufacture/retailer has confidence in that. But why Ozito power tools generally have better warranty terms then many "trade quality" tools?

I'm looking for a small router for some I suppose easy edge shape and cut job. I'm thinking Ryobi 18V battery powered one, 99 dollars and 2 year warranty, as I have 2 Ryobi 1.3A 18V Li batteries already. But also think a mains powered one might be better? Suddenly I see the Ozito 350W for only 69 dollars, with more accessories and a 3 year replacement warranty. 

Any thoughts? ( I don't do trade work for a living, the current project is a small coffee table.)











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19 posts

Geek
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  Reply # 1381307 7-Sep-2015 19:11
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If the brand name doesn't give you an idea of quality, offering a longer warranty period at least tells the consumer they think it will last 

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  Reply # 1381309 7-Sep-2015 19:15
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"Suddenly I saw the Ozito 350W for only 69 dollars, with more accessories and 3 year replacement warranty."

I know and use Ryobi tools - reliable & perfectly OK for domestic use.

Never heard of Ozito - the "3 year replacement warranty" sounds too good to be true, so it probably is ...




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  Reply # 1381315 7-Sep-2015 19:22
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Replaced by warranty or not, if a tool doesn't help but hinder you, it's useless. But hinder is not the name as broken, so your warranty is useless.



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1381316 7-Sep-2015 19:24
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Sideface: "Suddenly I saw the Ozito 350W for only 69 dollars, with more accessories and 3 year replacement warranty."

I know and use Ryobi tools - reliable & perfectly OK for domestic use.

Never heard of Ozito - the "3 year replacement warranty" sounds too good to be true, so it probably is ...


I guess at least bunnings has to replace the tool if it goes wrong. I have a Ozito Circular saw, with very rare use it does the job fine. The only condition which will void the warranty written on the manual is to replacing the motor brush when worn, which I think is very fair.

So maybe bunnings' bet is that average home user will not use power tools often enough so even an Ozito should last 3 years easily?   

gzt

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  Reply # 1381317 7-Sep-2015 19:24
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Because the majority of those ozito buyers will use it only a few times in three years and ozito know that. Very few people will be silly enough to try and earn a living with one, and then there is probably a trade exclusion in the warranty anyway.

Makita is a trade tool.



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1381321 7-Sep-2015 19:33
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gzt: Because the majority of those ozito buyers will use it only a few times in three years and ozito know that. Very few people will be silly enough to try and earn a living with one, and then there is probably a trade exclusion in the warranty anyway.

Makita is a trade tool.


That makes sense. But even Ozito drills have 3 year replacement warranty as well. I would normally think even a diyer would use the drill much more often than a router. According to the manual of my Ozito saw, there is no abnormal terms in the warranty section. 

Anyway, I didn't buy Ozito cordless drills because I found out that the cheap Ozito models have low torque and etc, while the powerful Ozito models are not really cheap.

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  Reply # 1381328 7-Sep-2015 19:44
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IMO and IANAL, the terms and conditions for those cheap 3 year warranty ones probably say you can't use them for trade use. The makita one probably says you can. Whatever the case, if you buy the makita one for personal use, you should still covered by the CGA, which overrides any warranty.

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  Reply # 1381330 7-Sep-2015 19:45
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"Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.




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  Reply # 1381332 7-Sep-2015 19:53
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Much like cash back deals, they may also be banking on the fact that it probably won't be claimed. Chances are by the time it dies you will have lost the receipt and the box it came in and write it off as a cheap tool. I have bought Ozito branded blades for my planer and they may actually have been made of cheese. If their router is similar, get a good set of name brand bits for it and it may be alright. That does kind of defeat the point of buying it cheap upfront though.




Try Vultr using this link and get us both some credit:

 

http://www.vultr.com/?ref=7033587-3B




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1381333 7-Sep-2015 19:59
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Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.



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  Reply # 1381335 7-Sep-2015 20:03
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paulmilbank: Much like cash back deals, they may also be banking on the fact that it probably won't be claimed. Chances are by the time it dies you will have lost the receipt and the box it came in and write it off as a cheap tool. I have bought Ozito branded blades for my planer and they may actually have been made of cheese. If their router is similar, get a good set of name brand bits for it and it may be alright. That does kind of defeat the point of buying it cheap upfront though.


I think the router doesn't come with any bit just like many expensive brands. I have an Ozito circular saw, but I don't have a good blade to compare so cannot comment on the supplied blade quality. 

I don't know about others but I always photocopied the thermal printed receipt and also keep an electronic copy in the email for anything I think that might break during the warranty period. :D

Yes for a router it make less sense to buy a cheap model because the bits are always quite expensive unless its a one-off job and only require few simple bits. I need to think about this.......:D

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  Reply # 1381338 7-Sep-2015 20:05
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Huchiz:
Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.


It makes complete sense - paulmilbank gives you the business model (see above).




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1381339 7-Sep-2015 20:07
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Sideface:
Huchiz:
Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.


It makes complete sense - paulmilbank gives you the business model (see above).


OK. :D But the business model doesn't work on me. 

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  Reply # 1381341 7-Sep-2015 20:08
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As far as I am aware, Makita NZ warranty is for three years for the tool and one year for batteries, I don't think the Makita tools from Bunnings are bought through Makita NZ, a little bit like DSE with Apple gear.

All my Makita battery tools have a three year warranty for the tool, they are used at least one hour each per day minimum.

Ozito and Ryobi tools are fantastic value for money and I have never heard of a problem with these, even with the tools used for trade use (boatbuilding).
If you do not use a certain tool for hours each day, go the Ozito or Ryobi. If you don't want to burst into tears when you drop your $600 Makita tool off two stories of scaffolding, buy Ozito or Ryobi.

If you earn your living relying on your tools, buy what you trust that will not let you down day or night, wet or dry. (Festool and Makita owner)

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  Reply # 1381364 7-Sep-2015 20:15
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Huchiz:
Sideface:
Huchiz:
Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.


It makes complete sense - paulmilbank gives you the business model (see above).


OK. :D But the business model doesn't work on me. 


But you are exceptional smile

Joe Bloggs does not keep receipts.




Sideface


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