Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




BDFL - Memuneh
67429 posts

Uber Geek

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

#191633 11-Feb-2016 09:19
Send private message

Just received:

 

 

Panasonic launches lithium-ion home storage battery system

 

Panasonic New Zealand has today launched its first Lithium-ion home storage battery - a clever system that can sense and store excess clean solar energy to power the household in the evening once the solar system has stopped producing.

This smart battery system provides a revolutionary and environmentally responsible solution to use solar energy on demand. New Zealand already has more than 8,000 homes with solar panels and this technology gives owner’s freedom to choose their energy source, manage their energy use and costs, in addition to providing an extra layer of critical energy security during power outages.

Panasonic’s Home Storage Battery system also offers a unique solution for New Zealand energy distributors. The batteries can be remotely controlled by an aggregated service provider, including utilities and energy communities, to reduce grid infrastructure expenses and better manage energy usage at peak times. This feature will help stabilise the grid by reducing solar system export during low demand times and supply it during peak times, such as in the evening. Many stakeholders and interested parties such as Transpower are investigating technologies to help them better manage existing infrastructure and Panasonic are perfectly placed to help with this easy to install and scalable solution.

 

Panasonic New Zealand’s Managing Director Stewart Fowler is excited by the growth and use of solar power systems in New Zealand and is proud to be at the cutting edge of the exciting new technology of home storage battery systems, which is widely regarded as the missing link to truly fulfil the potential of solar power systems.

“For the thousands of Kiwis who already generate their own solar power this is a dream come true, so we’re incredibly excited to bring this solution to New Zealand. We want to encourage Kiwis to take control over their power. The Panasonic Home Storage Battery System in conjunction with a solar power system could help an average New Zealand household to reduce their power purchase by up to 60%. We believe this is the way forward for sustainable energy consumption.

“This system isn’t limited to those who have solar panels. Consumers can use it to take advantage of favourable power prices during off-peak times or as an emergency power source for critical appliances. Energy providers can use it to meet fluctuating energy demands by using our smart demand response solutions, without having to invest in further infrastructure,” says Fowler.

Panasonic is a world leading lithium-ion battery manufacturer and for the past 40 years has been investing heavily in research and creating innovative batteries that provide a stable power supply that is reliable, high quality, high performance and safe in extreme conditions.

The slim home storage battery system looks similar to a heat pump outdoor unit and is a low-maintenance, standalone unit that can be installed inside or outside the home. Though this battery is designed for the residential market there are also major benefits for power retailers and energy distributors.

These utilities can reduce demand on their resources during peak times and provide savings to the consumer, along with providing back-up to run critical equipment during a blackout.

Energy distributors can use this as a cost effective alternative to increasing grid infrastructure for scale-ability in meeting fluctuating energy demands, such as a cold winter’s day when all households are running heaters and electricity demand is too high for the grid.

“Including the home storage battery system into new home building costs just makes sense for our future,” says Fowler. 

 

 





 

 

These links are referral codes

 

Geekzone broadband switch | Eletricity comparison and switch | Hatch investment (NZ$ 10 bonus if NZ$100 deposited within 30 days) | Sharesies | Mighty Ape | Backblaze | Amazon | My technology disclosure 


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
Banana?
4979 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1490147 11-Feb-2016 09:23
Send private message

No pricing? Don't imagine it will be cheap though.


1626 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1490149 11-Feb-2016 09:24
Send private message

trig42:

 

No pricing? Don't imagine it will be cheap though.

 

 

Just what I was thinking.


 
 
 
 


1283 posts

Uber Geek


  #1490170 11-Feb-2016 09:40
Send private message

Quick and drity calcs put it at around 50 cells of 60ah usable so say 30% DOD they will be 90ah cells. Around $6k USD retail for the cells. I'd say landed in NZ you'd pay $10-15k





Most problems are the result of previous solutions...

All comment's I make are my own personal opinion and do not in any way, shape or form reflect the views of current or former employers unless specifically stated 

mdf

2590 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1490173 11-Feb-2016 09:42
Send private message

Seems to be the way of the future. There's another thread over here about the similar sounding Tesla Powerwall, and another here that turned into a discussion about inverters. From what I remember of 5th form physics, solar and batteries are DC but everything in your house is AC (or at least expects AC to turn into DC). You therefore need an inverter to turn it into AC.

 

 

 

Hopefully that's right. I really think the future of power is micro-generation at point of use - we're just waiting for the battery technology (and pricing) to catch up. 


8381 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1490208 11-Feb-2016 10:06
Send private message

Wonder if your insurance company will want these batteries store down the end of your garden??





Regards,

Old3eyes


7069 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1490257 11-Feb-2016 11:17
Send private message

The more popular option presently is direct online solar, which works well if you can shuffle your loads to the midday period.

 

It's an ideal match/off set to air con heat pumps though, as the more summer cooling you need, the more power you are generating at the same time.

 

 

 

Batteries are a more comprehensive approach, but they do really up the anti, initial install cost, size and complexity and maintenance/upkeep wise.

 

The vibe at the EMANZ conference last year was that New Zealand consumers were looking for ways to supplement their grid supply, rather than completely do away with it.

 

 

 

Most of these additional systems will require a change to your meter, though the electricity companies will not buy your energy for a particularly good rate.

 

It's better to forget about that revenue stream and concentrate on perhaps 'earning' enough to cover your monthly line charge for example, focussing on using as much of the power that you generate instead.


1283 posts

Uber Geek


  #1490263 11-Feb-2016 11:34
Send private message

old3eyes:

 

Wonder if your insurance company will want these batteries store down the end of your garden??

 

 

 

 

I would be VERY surprised if this wasn't a fail-safe type of lipo chemistry like lifepo4 





Most problems are the result of previous solutions...

All comment's I make are my own personal opinion and do not in any way, shape or form reflect the views of current or former employers unless specifically stated 

 
 
 
 


359 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1490354 11-Feb-2016 13:31
Send private message

Beccara:

 

old3eyes:

 

Wonder if your insurance company will want these batteries store down the end of your garden??

 

 

 

 

I would be VERY surprised if this wasn't a fail-safe type of lipo chemistry like lifepo4 

 

 

The title states Lithium-Ion batteries that are common in consumer electronics, as used in cell phones, laptops, power tools, to electric vehicles.

 

I would happily install this setup between my solar inverter and meter board, outside on the south side of my house.

 

The main issue is affordability, which is currently unknown? 





:)


8381 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1490358 11-Feb-2016 13:34
Send private message

kotuku4:

 

Beccara:

 

old3eyes:

 

Wonder if your insurance company will want these batteries store down the end of your garden??

 

 

 

 

I would be VERY surprised if this wasn't a fail-safe type of lipo chemistry like lifepo4 

 

 

The title states Lithium-Ion batteries that are common in consumer electronics, as used in cell phones, laptops, power tools, to electric vehicles.

 

I would happily install this setup between my solar inverter and meter board, outside on the south side of my house.

 

 

The FAA would differ on the safety of these batteries.

 

http://www.cnet.com/news/faa-warns-of-potentially-catastrophic-battery-explosions/?ftag=CAD090e536&bhid=21733084820465824201997506452088





Regards,

Old3eyes


2127 posts

Uber Geek


  #1491036 12-Feb-2016 11:08
Send private message

old3eyes:

 

 

 

The FAA would differ on the safety of these batteries.

 

http://www.cnet.com/news/faa-warns-of-potentially-catastrophic-battery-explosions/?ftag=CAD090e536&bhid=21733084820465824201997506452088

 

 

Which is why, 1 major laptop brand is no longer bringing in replacement laptop batts to NZ !!!!!!
"Cant airfreight them in" was the excuse given, not much help to those needing a new laptop batt (I bought a clone batt instaed)
I guess some major companies have never heard of shipping via boat (which is still allowed for batts)


359 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1491059 12-Feb-2016 11:32
Send private message

Agree that there are certainly safety concerns with all Lithium batteries, the main problems I know of are with cheap Lithium Polymer Batteries used in toys.  I have experienced problems with poor quality and take all the recommended precautions with correct balance charging, safe storage and disposal.  There are restrictions on air transport and package for shipping now.

 

Better quality Lithium Ion batteries in cell phones, tablets and laptops are all around me at home and work, with limited concerns. 





:)


3885 posts

Uber Geek


  #1491470 13-Feb-2016 01:47

And as I have said before, Using a hot water cylinder to store excess solar production is far cheaper. (on a $$$ per kW/hr of storage basis) And more reliable and if installed properly extremely unlikely to explode. (Plumbing codes require a combination excess temperature / pressure relief valve, and a separate excess pressure only relief valve to be installed. And the thermostat has a manual reset over temp cutout as well. So 4 things need to all fail at the same time for a modern properly installed cylinder to explode.)

 

 

 

And that battery system has a max output in backup mode of only 1KVA. Considering a normal power point can provide 2.4KVA continuous. (and alot more peak) Having only 1KVA available will be extremely limiting. Depending on what the peak output is, you might not be able to run a refrigerator from it. And very unlikely to be able to run a water pump. So for most use cases, a hot water cylinder is still better. And get a generator instead for backup power.






41 posts

Geek


  #1496746 22-Feb-2016 02:07
Send private message

That 1kw max is ridiculous.

1515 posts

Uber Geek


  #1496762 22-Feb-2016 07:57
Send private message

Its not really for running gutsy appliances, the real benefits come from being able to sell back the power at peak rates, instead of just when its sunny.


7069 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1496788 22-Feb-2016 08:32
Send private message

The buy back rate is wholesale, so any system that revolves around that intention is quite flawed.  Maybe earlier on when you were paid closer to your retail cost, but the power companies soon shut that down.

Better approach in my opinion is to go direct online solar (no batteries) and aim to cover your monthly line charge only via selling back power, and schedule your power loads to the middle of the day.  Simple timers on your DHW for example will ensure this is only heating during the day, and delay start timers on dish washers and washing machines should push these into the self generation part of the day, after you've left for work.

 

 

 

Batteries can be added to this type of system at a later date, but direct online is a good low maintenance and cheaper place to start to get your feet wet.


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Menulog change colours as parent company merges with Dutch food delivery service
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:53


Techweek2020 goes digital to make it easier for Kiwis to connect and learn
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:48


Catalyst Cloud launches new Solutions Hub to support their kiwi Partners and Customers
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:44


Microsoft to help New Zealand job seekers acquire new digital skills needed for the COVID-19 economy
Posted 2-Jul-2020 07:41


Hewlett Packard Enterprise introduces new HPE GreenLake cloud services
Posted 24-Jun-2020 08:07


New cloud data protection services from Hewlett Packard Enterprise
Posted 24-Jun-2020 07:58


Hewlett Packard Enterprise unveils HPE Ezmeral, new software portfolio and brand
Posted 24-Jun-2020 07:10


Apple reveals new developer technologies to foster the next generation of apps
Posted 23-Jun-2020 15:30


Poly introduces solutions for Microsoft Teams Rooms
Posted 23-Jun-2020 15:14


Lenovo launches new ThinkPad P Series mobile workstations
Posted 23-Jun-2020 09:17


Lenovo brings Linux certification to ThinkPad and ThinkStation Workstation portfolio
Posted 23-Jun-2020 08:56


Apple introduces new features for iPhone iOS14 and iPadOS 14
Posted 23-Jun-2020 08:28


Apple announces Mac transition to Apple silicon
Posted 23-Jun-2020 08:18


OPPO A72 a top mid-tier smartphone
Posted 19-Jun-2020 18:02


D-Link A/NZ launches new smart AX1500 Wi-Fi 6 Router
Posted 19-Jun-2020 15:03



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.