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#195679 29-Apr-2016 15:12
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I have these old drawers, stained pine, in good condition. My wife would like them to be white. Do I just get some paint and slap it on, or do I need to do something special - sand, oil based primer, standard primer like dulux total prep, etc?

 

Can I expect a good job, if it's done carefully, or will it come out pretty rubbish? I'd probably take handles off and roll the paint on, other than the tricky bits.

 

Or should I just sell them (might get $200 max) and buy some already made white ($800).

 

 

 

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  #1544060 29-Apr-2016 15:15
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If it's pine you should be OK to just go over the top with a decent primer and then paint.  But if you want to be safe and make really sure no colour will leach through, give it a coat of shellac or shellac based primer first then paint over the top.  

 

Unless you're going for an "antique" finish and intend to wax (in which case use chalk paint) use a water based 'enamel' paint so it's hard wearing.

 

It is not so hard, use a foam roller and you will get a decent finish.  You only need about a litre of paint (say, 2 good coats) and about 500ml of primer, you will probably even have some left over if you are careful.




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  #1544065 29-Apr-2016 15:21
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So you can get a good finish? Great. Never used a foam roller, I just use regular ones. Wanting plain featureless white I believe.

 

My wife mentioned chalk paint... what's up with that? A textured paint of some kind?


 
 
 
 


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  #1544066 29-Apr-2016 15:23
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Clean the surfaces to be painted. Finger oil and other stuff on the surfaces can result in paint not sticking. Don't paint on anything wet (like after wiping with a damp cloth). The moisture will prevent the paint from sticking properly. Use a blow dryer if you're in a hurry. Make sure you dry it all out. Otherwise....wipe it with a damp soapy cloth and just leave it for a day or two to dry out in a sunny spot.

 

A very light (as in once or twice over lightly....not actually sanding) sand with a slightly course sandpaper (100-120 grit?) will rough up the surface and give the UNDERCOAT / PRIMER (one coat) something to stick to.

 

Use drop clothes. Wipe up any drips or you'l l step in them and track them around the house.....hugely annoying.  

 

Paint the drawers separately from the main main chest. Paint the accessible surfaces. Let them dry. Turn it over / upside down and do the remaining surfaces. Let them dry. Don't overbrush or brush sufaces after the paint has started to dry. You can re-paint surfaces after 3-4 hours usually. 

I've used good brushes with good results.....but with a glossy paint you have to learn to not go back over paint that has started to dry. I also use the wee 10cm rollers. Small, versatile and fit into most tight spaces...with a brush following on to catch any corners /awkward spots.  

 

After undercoating, you can paint three coats of gloss (I'd prefer - it wears better when cured).   I prefer water-based paints. Oil will wear harder, takes a lot longer to dry and cure....and it stinks for ages and is a hassle to clean up.   

 

I've learned it's important to let the paint 'cure' for 2-3 days....and then put the drawers back in. Acrylic "dries" quickly, but it doesn't really *harden* for several days. Waiting will help you avoid scraping paint of the surfaces you just painted when you put the drawers into the chest. 

 

This is how I've done it with several stained pine pieces of furniture. Plan on it taking most of week to get it finally ready.  





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  #1544067 29-Apr-2016 15:24
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Chalk paint has kind of a satin finish like old paints had.  You generally rub some parts down to make the furniture look worn and go over the top with furniture wax, or if you're lazy a satin water based poly.  Looks really nice if done right and it sticks to pretty much anything.  There's a crowd on waiheke island making it, it is quite good and no more expensive than a decent acrylic - I found watering it down a bit improved how smoothly it went on.

 

https://www.newtonspaints.co.nz/

 

 


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  #1544068 29-Apr-2016 15:26
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We painted ours a couple of years ago, but wanted the antique cracked look.

 

We bought a dark blue undercoat/primer, then some Crackling medium (from Spotlight I think) and a white/off white top coat. Came out really really well (replaced the handles with odd unmatched knobs we found round the place (and Ezibuy had some I think).

 

I think you will be fine with a primer that etches into the current finish, then a couple of coats of the white. Do you want a gloss or matte finish?


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  #1544081 29-Apr-2016 16:05
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Spraypaint would be better in my experiance.

 

And not the junk $3 cans from supercheap auto, they have the consitancy and opacity of milk. Rustolium self priming has done a great job on all the toolboxes and ugly brown wood cabinets I have done it on, Just avoid MDF as I found out it needs a special primer and it doesnt come in a spray can so means arsing about with rollers and then sanding the marks the side of the roller leave.





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  #1544083 29-Apr-2016 16:08
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Thanks for all the thoughts everyone. I've done a fair bit of house painting, so I know the importance of preparation, just not sure what this needed. Light sand, prime, paint seems like the general answer. Some good points on spills and such, but I'll probably just put it in the shed on a tarp to paint, and yeah it will take a couple of weeks given I'll be doing it weekends and evenings.

 

Pretty sure we want a glossy white finish, uniform white, not vintage looking.

 

Interested in more thoughts on spray paint out of cans vs roller.


 
 
 
 


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  #1544094 29-Apr-2016 16:36
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What are the runners in it like, and the joints on the inside of the draws? I think painting will look ok. If they are varnished, you maybe best to heat gun off the varnish then a light sand, and then paint. Spraying will get the nicest finish, unless you want to go for the brush paint look. As someone mentioned above, chalk paints are a good option too for that look.

 

 

 

If you want some inspiration, this designer takes some very average furniture like that, and makes then 'designer'

 

https://www.instagram.com/jay_n_co/


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  #1544109 29-Apr-2016 17:11
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Bunnings sells a cheap sprayer - would be worth having a crack at that for the best overall finish. $40 or so bucks.

 

Dont use matt, or satin - it will always show marks, and a bit of a PITA to wipe off - needs a bit of extra elbow grease to remove marks. Gloss is best.

 

Foam rollers - I find better than fuzzy rollers as fuzz seems to come adrift into the paint at the worst possible time ..

 

Use an acrylic-enamel paint (enamacryl ?), as enamel takes hours to dry, and invariably collects dust, lint  and bugs as it dries ....

 

If you want super-tough that's impact and knock resistant, go for a 2-pack epoxy paint. Once dried, it's so tough, even Chuck Norris ...





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  #1544110 29-Apr-2016 17:15
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It's wooden runners, not a nice running system.

 

Not sure I want to bother buying a sprayer, is that essential for a good finish, or can you use cans? A friend has a sprayer but that's for houses, maybe too big. If a roller will do almost as good a job and isn't much more work I'll do that, unless spraying is much much easier and quicker.

 

Never heard of two part epoxy paints, but have a friend who works at Dulux I can ask about. Tough would be nice, but not essential.


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  #1544626 30-Apr-2016 20:47
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How old is the stain? If it's oil based, it may bleed through any acrylic (water based) paints.

 

Put a coat of acrylic primer undercoat on (like Resene Quickdry). If any discolouration bleeds through, don't just put more acrylic over the top. It will keep bleeding. You will need a coat of oil based undercoat to act as a barrier for leeching. You need to be a bit careful mixing and matching between acrylic and oil based coats, but so long as you read the tins carefully/speak to someone competent in the shop you should be fine.

 

You will definitely need some kind of enamel top coat. Anything non-enamel will always be "soft" even when dry. e.g. the draws may feel tacky where two painted surfaces come into contact. As @SepticSceptic said, a two-pot epoxy is a really good option. Will dry super hard much quicker than anything out of a single can. Resene Uracryl is a good option (showing my brand loyalty - it was a student job). But once mixed, it's use it or lose it. For whites, I've had really good results doing two Quickdry undercoats and a single Uracryl top coat. But you must must must be painting indoors. It goes incredibly sticky as it dries, and any grass, pollen or insects will be stuck tight if you try and do it outside. 

 

I wouldn't be rollering drawers myself. Too small an area Even the sides are probably touch and go for coverage. I like me a good brush, and it will deal with fiddly bits around the handles and any rebates much easier. You also get a little more texture from a roller than brushing (properly). Spraying is a great option if you've got the knack for it. Spray paint is an option, but it's really expensive way of buying paint. You don't get that much in a can, and you could end up doing 6 to 8 coats on timber. To get a nice finish you need to lay down really light coats and let them go at least tacky before applying another one. Spray paint is relatively runny to get it out of the can just using an aerosol, so if you lay down too much you will likely get runs - even if you lay your surface to be painted flat it will run down the edges and either leave drip marks on the sides or glue the board to the newspaper underneath. It's also slow - usually no more than 30 seconds for a pass, then either twist or flip the nozzle for a burst to clear any potential beads that will spatter what you're painting. If you use ordinary timber paint with a sprayer, you usually only thin it a little because the powered sprayer has much higher pressure than spray cans. Thicker paint is less likely to run, so you can lay down more in a pass, so you need less coats. There is a big difference in sprayers though. And there is a knack to it.

 

As I say, I'd probably be brushing it myself.




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  #1544686 30-Apr-2016 23:37
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Friend of mine works for Dulux, he thinks it's a combination stain / varnish. A light sand then spray from good quality cans he thinks will be easiest - quite a few coats though, maybe even 5 - 6.

 

My wife thinks brushing is a better idea.

 

I've been on my feet and running around for 15 hours today so I think i'll consider it tomorrow.


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  #1544695 1-May-2016 00:21
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timmmay:

 

Friend of mine works for Dulux, he thinks it's a combination stain / varnish. A light sand then spray from good quality cans he thinks will be easiest - quite a few coats though, maybe even 5 - 6.

 

My wife thinks brushing is a better idea.

 

I've been on my feet and running around for 15 hours today so I think i'll consider it tomorrow.

 

 

Does she think that because she wants a rustic brushed finish, or because she sees the cost of spraycans?





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  #1544726 1-May-2016 09:34
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Cost isn't an issue, she's just done some reading and thinks a brush will be quick, easy, and give a good finish. I tend to even roll interior window sills because I like the finish better.


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  #1545358 2-May-2016 13:06
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mdf:

 

 As @SepticSceptic said, a two-pot epoxy is a really good option. Will dry super hard much quicker than anything out of a single can. Resene Uracryl is a good option (showing my brand loyalty - it was a student job). But once mixed, it's use it or lose it. For whites, I've had really good results doing two Quickdry undercoats and a single Uracryl top coat. But you must must must be painting indoors. It goes incredibly sticky as it dries, and any grass, pollen or insects will be stuck tight if you try and do it outside.

 

 

I tried looking for an on-line price for the Uracryl, and other "engineered paints" - why do they make something as simple as looking up a price so damned difficult ?

 

 





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