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Topic # 238169 5-Jul-2018 15:03
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Looking for some feedback/advice on Skylights..

 

I have checked out various options.. and seems good ones are very expensive.. Can buy a Velux tube type and DIY (don't want opening type) that are around $600 and the Solartube ones are Distributor install only.. at around $1,700.. discounted the cheaper Bunnings type.. with the flexible foil tube style.. 

 

My alternative plan

 

Replace a sheet - or half a sheet - of corrugated iron with a clear corrugated acrylic sheet.. then frame up  a light well from the rooms flat ceiling up to the roof. 

 

I am thinking of using a random - pre-loved - double glazed window at the ceiling level or a nice old lead light.. because i don't want the light well to lose heat through the chimney effect..  

 

The advantage in using this technique is that I can also channel some of that light into the hallway.. that would have otherwise required two skylights.. 

 

Even though I might not have the shiny SS tube like on the bought ones.. I was thinking of lining the well with the silver foil-back insulation product to get more reflection.. but also that the opening at ceiling level would be a lot bigger and therefore provide more light anyway.

 

Anyone done anything similar... I cannot see any reason why it wouldn't work.. appreciate any comments.. 

 

Image result Image result for diy skylight flat ceilingRelated image

 

 


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  Reply # 2049875 5-Jul-2018 15:23
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I think you'll struggle to join the sheet material of the well with your corrugate in an airtight manner, so expect dust from the ceiling space to come into your well, and fall onto your window

 

Have plenty of overlap between your corrugate steel and plastic for watertightness.

 

Certainly not the usual way to do it - but should be workable. 

 


That said, if I were a buyer looking at your home, this sort of thing would ring alarm bells

 

 

 

 


TLD

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  Reply # 2050190 5-Jul-2018 22:44
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We have two Solartubes, which I think cost about $3K total.  One is in what used to be a dark hallway that runs up the centre of the ridge line, so no chance of a skylight.  The other is at the darker end of a long dinning room.  They are in-bloody-credible!  The dinning room one is bigger, and a fair bit brighter.  Six months on we are still finding ourselves trying to turn the lights off, but they have both made an amazing difference.

 

The quality of the light is also good.  Sort of like a round photography softbox, and pretty much daylight in colour, or maybe more white than that hint of blue.  We love them.  I especially like the UFO light on the roof when it is dark outside.  I might put my coat on and go take a picture for you.

 

Friends across the road have a skylight in front of their entrance door, and while it certainly brightens their hallway, they say it sucks the heat out.  I think — but I am a bit fuzzy on this — they also said it drips condensation.  I can't ask them as they are away for the next four weeks.

 

Bugger.  Just remembered that my big camera bag is being looked after by our neighbour while we have the tradies in, so I could only take a picture with my phone.

 

Speaking of tradies, the electrician replaced all the incandescent down-lighters with LED lights today, and by heck are they bright, and he says they use a lot less power, so apart from the not inconsiderable cost of replacing them, a win win situation.

 

 

 

 





Trevor Dennis
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  Reply # 2050205 5-Jul-2018 23:16
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Just get some decent LED lights installed. Still cheaper overall, even after allowing for the extra power usage.

Even good quality double glazing only has an R value of 0.5 or so. While even cheap roof insulation will be around R1.8, and good quality roof insulation will be R4+.

So you will also be paying more for heating.





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  Reply # 2050232 6-Jul-2018 03:14
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We too have two Solartubes - had them installed in our new house about three years ago. Large one in our master bedroom ensuite, smaller one in our master bedroom walk-in wardrobe. Absolutely brilliant - both literally and figuratively. Very bright in sunlight and dull (but see-able) light in moonlight - to the extent that most nights I can go into the ensuite and not need to turn the light on. More than adequate light on a cloudy day. Big fan of these things.

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  Reply # 2050284 6-Jul-2018 09:21
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I think that any roof (or cladding) penetration with diameter > 300mm requires building consent.

 

I assume that the "solatube" things are designed so that the roof penetration is < 300mm?

 

My neighbour installed automated Velux skylights, they're for cooling as much or more than extra light (3 story house with a lot of glass, the upper floors turn into a furnace).  The automation includes heat sensors so that they'll open above a certain indoor temperature, and rain sensors so they'll close when it rains.  They were very expensive.


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  Reply # 2050318 6-Jul-2018 09:48
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Stephendnz:

 

Anyone done anything similar... I cannot see any reason why it wouldn't work.. appreciate any comments.. 

 

 

The biggest issue I can see how to deal with the condensation on the inside of the clear acrylic sheet (because you will have to remove the building paper/moisture barrier under the tin) 


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  Reply # 2050326 6-Jul-2018 10:06
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https://www.building.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/projects-and-consents/building-work-consent-not-required-guidance.pdf

 

Please refer to page 33 onward as it describes what you 'can' and 'can't' do as a homeowner with regards to windows/doors.

 

If any of the work you are planning to do does not comply with the building code (which it sounds like it doesn't) then you 'can't' do it. At worst this work could cause issues with insurance and or future sale of the property.

 

Generally if something failed on your home you can replace it with a similar product but it needs to be installed to modern building code standards so future failure is minimised.

 

 


neb

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  Reply # 2050743 6-Jul-2018 18:20
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TLD:

We have two Solartubes, which I think cost about $3K total.  One is in what used to be a dark hallway that runs up the centre of the ridge line, so no chance of a skylight.  The other is at the darker end of a long dinning room.  They are in-bloody-credible!  The dinning room one is bigger, and a fair bit brighter.  Six months on we are still finding ourselves trying to turn the lights off, but they have both made an amazing difference.

 

 

Friend of mine got some put in as well, the performance is amazing, you don't even realise how much of a difference they make until you hold a pillow over the outlet and wonder who turned the lights out.

 

 

TLD:

Friends across the road have a skylight in front of their entrance door, and while it certainly brightens their hallway, they say it sucks the heat out.  I think — but I am a bit fuzzy on this — they also said it drips condensation.  I can't ask them as they are away for the next four weeks.

 

 

That's why Velux ones cost so much, you're getting argon-filled double-glazed blah blah which helps with this. This is why I'd be a bit nervous about a DIY skylight... solar tube is fine, but for a skylight I'd be tempted to get the real deal.

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