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networkn

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#289827 1-Oct-2021 16:27
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We have about 20M of this 'hedge' around our property, which we use as a privacy hedge. It's about 16 years old now, and some have died and others are thinning. 

 

We haven't been very good about trimming it, it usually gets attention every couple of years on average. 

 

It seems to have grown quite quickly since the trimming in May. The people who did it, did the best job of trimming it I've ever seen, it was lovely and straight and even. 

 

All the videos I have found on Trimming these, they don't look even remotely similar (and actually look pretty terrible). I am trying to work out if it's the skill they had or the tools they used (I have a ryobi extended hedge trimmer). 

 

I have never trimmed hedges before, it's not really my jam, but am thinking it might be worth having a go at taking 5-7cm off the top and not touching the sides too much. 

 

I have been warned that actually, they could all pretty much die any time and need to be replaced and it's been recommended I switch types of hedge. They are currently a good 2.5m high, but 2M would be ideal. Most of the mature plants I see, are at most 1.5m high but are pretty expensive. 

 

I am in Auckland.

 

Anyone have any thoughts or tips on trimming these particular things? 

 

Cheers

 

 


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Handsomedan
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  #2787746 1-Oct-2021 16:58
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I use a cheap Bunnings house-brand trimmer for our (admittedly fairly young and small) griselina bush. 

 

As long as it's sharp and you have a fairly steady hand, I don't see an issue with using any old tool to make a nicely trimmed bush. 

 

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cshwone
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  #2787747 1-Oct-2021 17:02
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I had a number of hedges around my property including Griselena. They were all about 3.5 to 4 metres tall. I tried to just keep on top of it using me mobile scaffolding and trimmer but gave up and two years ago I hacked them all back to 1.6 m ish and accepted the risk. I used a reciprocating saw for most of the work.

 

They all looked absolutely crap on cutting down but have since thickened and I can keep them steady at 1.65 to 1.7m. just go for it - you have already accepted you might have to replace them so just give it a go. You have nothing to lose (hack the sides as well)


networkn

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  #2787749 1-Oct-2021 17:04
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cshwone:

 

I had a number of hedges around my property including Griselena. They were all about 3.5 to 4 metres tall. I tried to just keep on top of it using me mobile scaffolding and trimmer but gave up and two years ago I hacked them all back to 1.6 m ish and accepted the risk. I used a reciprocating saw for most of the work.

 

They all looked absolutely crap on cutting down but have since thickened and I can keep them steady at 1.65 to 1.7m. just go for it - you have already accepted you might have to replace them so just give it a go. You have nothing to lose (hack the sides as well)

 

 

My only hesitation is they still look pretty shapely now, and I am worried they will look awful for it.

 

I may start with the tops and see how it looks :)

 

 




Zeon
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  #2787759 1-Oct-2021 17:44
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I saw so many Grisilina die in the summer of 2019/2020 around Auckland. I wonder if its not suited to the Auckland climate?





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davidcole
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  #2787760 1-Oct-2021 17:55
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I’ve got 2m long petrol hedge trimmer. Have some 2m high but about 2m deep hedges all round the front of the property.

I’d trim the top and sides every 6 months. It’s pretty woody though so it can struggle at time.





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tdgeek
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  #2787787 1-Oct-2021 19:15
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Thats the same as NZ Broadleaf, which is native? 

 

I have that here. (ChCh)

 

Re the OP, who is not a hedge trimmer expert, neither was I, here are my experiences. When we moved here we had maybe 25m of Escalonia, 10m of Portuguese Laurel, 10m of NZ Broadleaf, and 20m of waist high Corokia.

 

I bought a Stihl HS45. petrol trimmer. Vertically (as most are 1.8m high) pretty average but getting there. Horizontally, laser straight and level.

 

If you need to "fix" it, its a biggish task, and the end result takes time to heal. If its trimmed regularly you take off less, its easier to trim, less to clean up, and a better look. (more leaves less twigs)

 

Much easier to make a nice job if you are trimming not fixing.(I.e. a big cutback. Been there done that too)

 

NZ Broadleaf/Griselina has soft twigs so its easy to trim (as compared to brown hard twigs) 


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  #2787928 1-Oct-2021 23:49
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networkn:

cshwone:


I had a number of hedges around my property including Griselena. They were all about 3.5 to 4 metres tall. I tried to just keep on top of it using me mobile scaffolding and trimmer but gave up and two years ago I hacked them all back to 1.6 m ish and accepted the risk. I used a reciprocating saw for most of the work.


They all looked absolutely crap on cutting down but have since thickened and I can keep them steady at 1.65 to 1.7m. just go for it - you have already accepted you might have to replace them so just give it a go. You have nothing to lose (hack the sides as well)



My only hesitation is they still look pretty shapely now, and I am worried they will look awful for it.


I may start with the tops and see how it looks :)


 



Just take your time and start somewhere it doesn’t matter. If you butcher it a bit it’ll likely grow back. If you don’t cut too much at first you’ll learn pretty quickly. It’s gardening not open heart surgery so the consequences are fairly low.



tdgeek
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  #2787952 2-Oct-2021 07:28
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Handle9: If you don’t cut too much at first you’ll learn pretty quickly.

 

Good advice. If its going ok, cut a bit more, it doesnt work that well the other way round.


networkn

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  #2787966 2-Oct-2021 09:01
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Handle9: Just take your time and start somewhere it doesn’t matter. If you butcher it a bit it’ll likely grow back. If you don’t cut too much at first you’ll learn pretty quickly. It’s gardening not open heart surgery so the consequences are fairly low.

 

Thanks. Yeah, I get that, but, to some degree if I mess it up entirely, then we lose our privacy and replacing hedges is a real PITA.

 

I'll just have a go and start small on the top and see what happens.

 

 


tdgeek
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  #2788109 2-Oct-2021 12:05
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networkn:

 

Handle9: Just take your time and start somewhere it doesn’t matter. If you butcher it a bit it’ll likely grow back. If you don’t cut too much at first you’ll learn pretty quickly. It’s gardening not open heart surgery so the consequences are fairly low.

 

Thanks. Yeah, I get that, but, to some degree if I mess it up entirely, then we lose our privacy and replacing hedges is a real PITA.

 

I'll just have a go and start small on the top and see what happens.

 

 

 

 

I get your worries, I had them too when we moved here, having never used a hedge trimmer. Just give it a wee trim, a shave, you won't butcher it. 

 

Make sure you have something STABLE to stand on. I have a folding ladder thing that goes to about a one metres platform i can walk along, but I always put thin wood on the hedge side feet as soil is softer. Make sure you wear plastic glasses. If you use a petrol trimmer, make sure you wear earmuffs. I know all thats obvious, but it only takes once. 

 

Hope it goes well


Bung
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  #2788217 2-Oct-2021 12:40
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If that folding ladder is one of those "W" fold ladders with 3 similar hinges check that it wasn't recalled. Some brands collapse when centre hinge fails to lock. Example https://www.productsafety.gov.au/recalls/repco%E2%80%94mechpro-multi-fold-ladder

scuwp
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  #2788245 2-Oct-2021 13:45
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We have these, and hate them. They don't like being trimmed too aggressively, and every now and again one just ups and dies for no reason, taking a couple of years for the new plant to fill the gap. Asking a variety of experts the best I get is "that happens sometimes".

We fertilise ours regularly but still can be a bit woody and thin in places where it was trimmed to harshly. I suggest to go slow, bit at a time, and see what it looks like.




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tdgeek
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  #2788248 2-Oct-2021 13:50
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Bung: If that folding ladder is one of those "W" fold ladders with 3 similar hinges check that it wasn't recalled. Some brands collapse when centre hinge fails to lock. Example https://www.productsafety.gov.au/recalls/repco%E2%80%94mechpro-multi-fold-ladder

 

Thanks. Mine is DoFair, can't find any recalls. 


panther2
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  #2788417 2-Oct-2021 21:10
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I use a cordless trimmer and do it about twice a year but not in summer as they are a great.place for wasp nests

PANiCnz
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  #2788680 3-Oct-2021 17:31
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Zeon:

 

I saw so many Grisilina die in the summer of 2019/2020 around Auckland. I wonder if its not suited to the Auckland climate?

 

 

I believe they suffer from Kauri dieback or something similar. My neighbor has had a few die. 


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