Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




103 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


Topic # 87570 1-Aug-2011 16:17
Send private message

Would you buy a house with polystyrene cladding?
Timber frame, wrap, cavity, polystyrene and then plaster.
Is it the general perception that this is potentially leaky and if yes, why would it be more prone to leaks than any other form of cladding?

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
13534 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1647


  Reply # 500433 1-Aug-2011 16:27
Send private message

Nikoftime: Would you buy a house with polystyrene cladding?
Timber frame, wrap,?cavity, polystyrene and then plaster.
Is it the general perception that this is potentially leaky and if yes, why would it be more prone to leaks than any other form of cladding?


It depends on how well it is flashed, and whether the roof has overhangs.

IT Professional
1706 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 166

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 500439 1-Aug-2011 16:32
Send private message

When we were house buying in Ashburton 5 years ago we came across a house that was clad like this and because of when we saw while looking around the house and property it ended up with classified as a leaky home.

The polystyrene had gaps around the windows where the sheets met (or should have met - and they were not tiny gaps either!!!). As it turned out, the weather was happily getting into the gaps and rotting the walls. Don't know if the cause was shoddy workmanship or a nature of the product.

 
 
 
 


13534 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1647


  Reply # 500442 1-Aug-2011 16:40
Send private message

keewee01: When we were house buying in Ashburton 5 years ago we came across a house that was clad like this and because of when we saw while looking around the house and property it ended up with classified as a leaky home.

The polystyrene had gaps around the windows where the sheets met (or should have met - and they were not tiny gaps either!!!). As it turned out, the weather was happily getting into the gaps and rotting the walls. Don't know if the cause was shoddy workmanship or a nature of the product.


I don't think there is anything wrong with the product, but they have to be installed properly with the correct flashings. However I believe building products only have to last a certain number of years under the building code. I think it is only about 10 to 20 years.

1601 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 509

Subscriber

  Reply # 500445 1-Aug-2011 16:42
Send private message

I wouldn't touch it. Other than the actual possibilty of leaking the perception that these houses leak make then really hard to

1) Sell
2) Finance

When we bought our most recent house (about 18 months ago) the banks were requiring invasive building inspections for any plaster style houses. Alot of people don't even bother to go and have a look at plaster style houses.

To me a large part of buying a house is an investment decision and, to me, a house that is difficult sell again is a poor investment. Depends on your view of risk I guess.

1125 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 126

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 500447 1-Aug-2011 16:44
Send private message

Nikoftime: Would you buy a house with polystyrene cladding?
Timber frame, wrap, cavity, polystyrene and then plaster.
Is it the general perception that this is potentially leaky and if yes, why would it be more prone to leaks than any other form of cladding?

I wasn't aware that there were houses built like this. Without any knowledge of this, and my viewpoint may change depending on more information about it, my initial response would be no.
Polystyrene doesn't scream durable to me, which is something I would want in a home. I would imagine that it would be warm, but, to me, polystyrene is for packaging, or, coolstores, not homes.

 



20695 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4012

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 500448 1-Aug-2011 16:45
Send private message

If you want something that looks like plastered cement, then use plastered cement. all the leakey building crap happened because people basically took techniques that hollywood uses when making props and sets and applied them to houses.




Richard rich.ms

478 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 33


  Reply # 500464 1-Aug-2011 17:18
Send private message

Theres different levels of cladding types and finish. A home with wide eaves is going to be more effectively water tight than one with no eaves.
Some cladding systems used proper flashings and some didnt..... Insulclad I believe is one of the better systems. If properly maintained, then there is quite often no issue.

If proper precautions arent maintained then any home can leak.....

13534 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1647


  Reply # 500466 1-Aug-2011 17:19
Send private message

dolsen:
Nikoftime: Would you buy a house with polystyrene cladding?
Timber frame, wrap,?cavity, polystyrene and then plaster.
Is it the general perception that this is potentially leaky and if yes, why would it be more prone to leaks than any other form of cladding?

I wasn't aware that there were houses built like this. Without any knowledge of this, and my viewpoint may change depending on more information about it, my initial response would be no.
Polystyrene doesn't scream durable to me, which is something I would want in a home. I would imagine that it would be warm, but, to me, polystyrene is for packaging, or, coolstores, not homes.

?




If it is protected with plaster, then it doesn't matter too much what the material is, and polystyrene doesn't rot like timber can. Poly is also used for underfloor installation and under concrete, and it is stable so doesn't break down. They make buildings out of straw too, but that is plastered over. I'd rather a house out of poly than straw myself. Timber isn't the most durable material either, and has to have a paint surface and checmial treatment in order to have a long life.

1852 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 249

Trusted

  Reply # 500468 1-Aug-2011 17:27
Send private message

The leaky home troubles had a lot of variables, but one common problem was the plaster on poly style house you described, without any eaves (roof overhang). Either factor on their own would probably be alright, although still a little more vulnerable than traditional construction, but combined together they became very vulnerable to leaks, if they werent built perfectly.



103 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 2


Reply # 500494 1-Aug-2011 18:17
Send private message

Interesting and informative answers, thanks guys, keep them comingSmile

39 posts

Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 500516 1-Aug-2011 18:56
Send private message

I have friends who used this method when renovating their home - process was quite fascinating. That was around 15 years ago - their house is very tidy, waterproof and warm. I believe it all depends on how well it's done in the first place.




"You know, you blow up one sun and suddenly everyone expects you to walk on water!"

478 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 33


  Reply # 500519 1-Aug-2011 18:59
Send private message

We recently had 2 separate 'experts' look at out place. One was a builder with years of experience. He went around the house and brought up various issues with moisture (using a meter) at certain points throughout the property. He wasnt a fan of plaster homes....

Another expert looked at the same areas with a thermographic camera and a moisture meter. This proved that the previous builder was testing at spots where metal strapping and bracing board were present. That automatically gave higher / incorrect readings when in fact all of the readings at the correct places (away from hidden steel) were within spec.

So even testing milage may vary.....

20695 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4012

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 500520 1-Aug-2011 18:59
Send private message

dragonsinger57: I have friends who used this method when renovating their home - process was quite fascinating. That was around 15 years ago - their house is very tidy, waterproof and warm. I believe it all depends on how well it's done in the first place.


Undoubtedly, I have encountered builders who shouldn't even be allowed to construct birdhouses. But that doesnt change that the solid claddings cant handle movement of the house anywhere near as well as proven weatherboard construction.




Richard rich.ms

2299 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 237


  Reply # 500526 1-Aug-2011 19:10
Send private message

Nikoftime: Would you buy a house with polystyrene cladding?
Timber frame, wrap, cavity, polystyrene and then plaster.
Is it the general perception that this is potentially leaky and if yes, why would it be more prone to leaks than any other form of cladding?


What year was the house built? Cavity indicates maybe after 2004. 2008 was mandatory treated timber. You may be after the worst of the "leaky building" phase.

Infrastructure Geek
4045 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 193

Trusted
Microsoft NZ
Subscriber

  Reply # 500563 1-Aug-2011 21:06
Send private message

mattwnz:  However I believe building products only have to last a certain number of years under the building code. I think it is only about 10 to 20 years.


Surely that cant be true, or there must be exceptions for certain types of products.  I'm pretty sure i remember my building consent for extening the house in Auckland to have a requirement that I build a structure with a minimum life of 50 years.  Pretty hard to do that with building products that have a 10 or 20 year life... 




Technical Evangelist
Microsoft NZ
about.me/nzregs
Twitter: @nzregs


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

CPTPP text and National Interest Analysis released for public scrutiny
Posted 21-Feb-2018 19:43


Foodstuffs to trial digitised shopping trolleys
Posted 21-Feb-2018 18:27


2018: The year of zero-login, smart cars & the biometrics of things
Posted 21-Feb-2018 18:25


Intel reimagines data centre storage with new 3D NAND SSDs
Posted 16-Feb-2018 15:21


Ground-breaking business programme begins in Hamilton
Posted 16-Feb-2018 10:18


Government to continue search for first Chief Technology Officer
Posted 12-Feb-2018 20:30


Time to take Appleā€™s iPad Pro seriously
Posted 12-Feb-2018 16:54


New Fujifilm X-A5 brings selfie features to mirrorless camera
Posted 9-Feb-2018 09:12


D-Link ANZ expands connected smart home with new HD Wi-Fi cameras
Posted 9-Feb-2018 09:01


Dragon Professional for Mac V6: Near perfect dictation
Posted 9-Feb-2018 08:26


OPPO announces R11s with claims to be the picture perfect smartphone
Posted 2-Feb-2018 13:28


Vocus Communications wins a place on the TaaS panel
Posted 26-Jan-2018 15:16


SwipedOn raises $1 million capital
Posted 26-Jan-2018 15:15


Slingshot offers unlimited gigabit fibre for under a ton
Posted 25-Jan-2018 13:51


Spark doubles down on wireless broadband
Posted 24-Jan-2018 15:44



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.