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#225512 22-Nov-2017 13:37
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Hi sorry this is getting weirder by the week -

 

But does anyone know where to get lactose free milk powder? For someone who is 100% lactose intolerant and don't drink milk by the bottle ...

 

Thanks





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  #1905772 22-Nov-2017 13:41
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Not sure about milk powder but Countdown sells lactose free milk in both full cream and low fat.

 

https://shop.countdown.co.nz/Shop/Browse/baking-cooking/dairy-free-milk-alternatives/lactose-free-milk 






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  #1906894 24-Nov-2017 08:35
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Fonterra make it.

 

Call / message them to find out if it's available retail packaged, and where.


 
 
 
 




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  #1907120 24-Nov-2017 14:16
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Ok thanks. GZ sampling suggests it's not widely bought so probably no one stocks it eh.




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  #2309640 2-Sep-2019 18:49
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I'm very interested in this topic.  I tried searching for lactose free milk powder particularly in NZ but there isn't any.. this is in spite of what must be interest in the product from a number of people and now we have Fonterra making it but only for overseas market.

 

One day it might become available locally but why not at the same time as our national company is providing overseas consumers with it ?  There won't be customers until there is a product to buy and until they put some out there and see what happens.

 

They could even start with online sales then move forward.

 

Milk powder can be carried while travelling too.


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  #2309642 2-Sep-2019 18:59
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Is it milk or fake/alternative milk? Lactose free milk seems like cocoa free chocolate.


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  #2309653 2-Sep-2019 19:42
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I am lactose intolerant. I drink the Anchor Lacto-Free milk. I have no issue with it and it tastes like milk. The thing I have noticed is the milk frother in my coffee machine won't make it froth.




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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

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  #2309672 2-Sep-2019 20:22
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Definitely not fake milk, it's just the removal of a type of sugar, it maybe has slightly less taste so I like the longlife UHT milk in the cartons as it has a flavour that makes it seem more full bodied. Not everyone would like it.

 

About the not frothing problem.. are you using low fat ?  As far as I know low fat milks don't froth as well. Regular fat content milk is also good for lactose intolerant people as the fat slows down the absorption of the lactose.


 
 
 
 


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  #2309674 2-Sep-2019 20:37
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My wife was for many years lactose intolerant.  Despite finding out that she can now tolerate it, we continue to use the same "milk powder".

 

https://alfafoods.co.nz/ 


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  #2309725 2-Sep-2019 22:16
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susanac:

 

Regular fat content milk is also good for lactose intolerant people as the fat slows down the absorption of the lactose.

 

 

I've been told raw milk is the best milk to use, especially for people with allergies/intolerance. I do know of people where their health issues like asthma and eczema have been improved by drinking raw milk.

 

Raw milk isn't always readily available and I go out of my way to try and buy full fat milk, however it is pasteurised.  I don't believe the low fat milks etc have the same goodness of unprocessed milk. Much of the milk you buy these days has been "pulled apart" and some components removed to make other products then put back together. What you get isn't what Mother Nature made.

 

It seems to me the dairy intolerance has increased since the days of the milk we used to get in the bottles with the silver tops delivered to our gates by the friendly milkman. I do wonder that the increase in dairy intolerance is related to the way milk is processed today.

 

I also wonder that some of the other food intolerance that seems to be more prevalent today is due to the processing of the food we eat.





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  #2309757 3-Sep-2019 07:30
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I'm not sure the different types of milk don't have the same goodness as in calcium and vitamins however there does seem to be a connection between the low fat milks and some intolerance. I have now read a couple of times from good sources that full fat milk does reduce lactose intolerance because of the slow absorption rate which would explain why years ago there weren't so many cases of these intolerances.. there was only one type of milk and most people could tolerate it.. there are always exceptions.

 

More minor intolerances can come and go depending a bit on our general health . Few years ago my body threw out every bit of cows milk however I can now accept it quite well but I stick to full fat in most cases and lactose free so as not to tempt fate. Having some full fat foods satisfy our appetites more and mean we don't keep eating.

 

Raw milk scares me a bit. If not handled well milk carries potential problems and goes off quickly. I didn't think it was pasteurised but if it is then it would be safer than not being pasteurised.


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  #2309764 3-Sep-2019 08:04
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susanac:

 

I'm not sure the different types of milk don't have the same goodness as in calcium and vitamins however there does seem to be a connection between the low fat milks and some intolerance.

 

 

Yes the calcium and vitamins may be the same. I was getting at the fact that the milk generally available on supermarket shelves has been through various (unnatural) processes before it's put into the container you buy it in. While I have no proof, I suspect these processes degrade the overall goodness of the milk. I use the term "goodness" in a very general sense.

 

susanac:

 

Raw milk scares me a bit. If not handled well milk carries potential problems and goes off quickly. I didn't think it was pasteurised but if it is then it would be safer than not being pasteurised.

 

 

You are correct raw milk is unpasteurised, hence the name. Pasteurising "cooks" the milk to kill any bad bugs that might be present but in the process also kills off good bugs that are present. It's these good bugs that also help with intolerance/allergies etc





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  #2309838 3-Sep-2019 10:12
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Technofreak:

 

You are correct raw milk is unpasteurised, hence the name. Pasteurising "cooks" the milk to kill any bad bugs that might be present but in the process also kills off good bugs that are present. It's these good bugs that also help with intolerance/allergies etc

 

 

Call me a skeptic or a cynic, but for the life of me I can't think of why cow milk would contain "good bugs" that we humans have co-evolved with to form part of our "natural" gut biota, partly because cow milk isn't something humans have been drinking for very long.

 

Playing in dirt or outdoors - rather than being confined in a sanitised environment - seems more natural, and correlates with reduced incidence of some allergies etc - if exposure was at a young age.  But if you feed a baby or toddler unpasteurised cow's milk, there's a good chance that they'll get extremely unwell or die.


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  #2309851 3-Sep-2019 10:53
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Technofreak:

 

 

 

 

 

You are correct raw milk is unpasteurised, hence the name. Pasteurising "cooks" the milk to kill any bad bugs that might be present but in the process also kills off good bugs that are present. It's these good bugs that also help with intolerance/allergies etc

 

 

Lactose intolerance is not an allergy it is an intolerance brought about the body do longer having the ability to provide lactase to brake down lactose.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

Be it ever so humble, there is no place like home.


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  #2309858 3-Sep-2019 11:02
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MikeB4:

 

Technofreak:

 

You are correct raw milk is unpasteurised, hence the name. Pasteurising "cooks" the milk to kill any bad bugs that might be present but in the process also kills off good bugs that are present. It's these good bugs that also help with intolerance/allergies etc

 

 

Lactose intolerance is not an allergy it is an intolerance brought about the body do longer having the ability to provide lactase to brake down lactose.

 

 

 

 

Just to be clear I didn't say an intolerance is an allergy.





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