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Topic # 184039 8-Nov-2015 02:03
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As the title suggests, which way do you prefer to hill start and why?
see: http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Started-on-a-Hill-when-Driving-a-Manual-Transmission-Car

 

     

  1. Heel-toe
  2. Shuffle
  3. Handbrake

 


My reason for asking, I'm currently learning how to drive a manual car after using an auto since I got my learners. I've been on my full for 3-4 years now so it's more a case of learning a new way of doing something rather than learning to drive from scratch. 

I've had a professional driving lesson last week and was taught a few ways but keep getting the feeling that I should be using the handbrake method. Mainly because I'm terrified of stalling while shuffling between peddles and rolling back into another car. I haven't left my neighbourhood yet because of this, as to get out I need to go up a very very steep hill (more often than not it's from a complete stop due to morning traffic). See here and here, the only two ways out.

Any tips would deffo be much appreciated. 




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  Reply # 1423018 8-Nov-2015 03:05
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Modern cars are easier to use the methods without the handbrake. The clutch and gear changes are usually much easier and the engine more responsive. In many old cars there was little chance of a hill start without using the handbrake.

I think it is worth learning. But I remember it making a hill start more complicated to coordinate between hands and feet because of the need to add the handbrake release.

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  Reply # 1423019 8-Nov-2015 03:38
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Before I moved to New Zealand I always drove manuals (so have more than a quarter of a century experience on manual). I use the handbrake if its a really steep hill with cars right behind me or if I drive a car I am not used to in terms of where the clutch kicks in. Most of the time I will do hill start by letting up the brake and clutch and working the accelerator (so the shuffle). 

Don't think I want to try the Heel-toe, wouldn't think I would have a good enough feel with the accelerator that way.




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  Reply # 1423024 8-Nov-2015 05:57
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always used the handbrake method, a proven effective way of doing it, saying that my new work vehicle is a ford ranger manual which has hill start assist, it keeps the brakes on for a few seconds to give you some time to get moving.

It works well but been brought up manuals it's always been the handbrake method.

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  Reply # 1423025 8-Nov-2015 06:20
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I was taught in the UK with handbrake method, which I still use the majority of the time. Use this method for learning. If traffic is gradually moving forward in a queue up a hill it is socially acceptable to leave a a couple of car lengths gap before moving forwards.
As you get more confident you can use the shuffle method in those situations, but still you handbrake method when first setting off.
I have never used the heel-toe method and you would never be taught that in UK. From the pictures in that link it looks dangerous to me.

My new car also has hill start assist. I sometimes use it when stopping for a moment at a junction, but still mainly use handbrake method.

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  Reply # 1423030 8-Nov-2015 08:14
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For the full experience, handbrake hill-start in an old Landover and then double-declutch from 1st to 2nd.

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  Reply # 1423036 8-Nov-2015 08:25
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tardtasticx: As the title suggests, which way do you prefer to hill start and why?
see: http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Started-on-a-Hill-when-Driving-a-Manual-Transmission-Car


  1. Heel-toe

  2. Shuffle

  3. Handbrake



My reason for asking, I'm currently learning how to drive a manual car after using an auto since I got my learners. I've been on my full for 3-4 years now so it's more a case of learning a new way of doing something rather than learning to drive from scratch. 

I've had a professional driving lesson last week and was taught a few ways but keep getting the feeling that I should be using the handbrake method. Mainly because I'm terrified of stalling while shuffling between peddles and rolling back into another car. I haven't left my neighbourhood yet because of this, as to get out I need to go up a very very steep hill (more often than not it's from a complete stop due to morning traffic). See here and here, the only two ways out.

Any tips would deffo be much appreciated. 


Can I ask why you want to use a manual car?

Modern automatic transmissions are far better and efficient than manuals, unless you are going to do serious off roading or truck driving.




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  Reply # 1423039 8-Nov-2015 08:31
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Handbrake. Easy, Reliable. Handbrake on, engage gear, ease clutch out, when you feel it biting, ease off handbrake.

Mike
Modern automatic transmissions are far better and efficient than manuals, 

Is that the case these days?  Given that autos are driving on compressed oil rather than direct drive, I'd have thought that the decades old status that they are a bit slower and use more gas, still applies?

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  Reply # 1423040 8-Nov-2015 08:41
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www.practice.co.nz suggests the handbrake method.

I think the chances of rolling back would be greater in methods 1 & 2.  

The young fella is going for his restricted in a couple of weeks and he has certainly been learning the handbrake method.
The restricted test guide doesn't appear to have anything explicit on hill-starts - I'm a bit little surprised at that.






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  Reply # 1423042 8-Nov-2015 08:44
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tdgeek: Handbrake. Easy, Reliable. Handbrake on, engage gear, ease clutch out, when you feel it biting, ease off handbrake.

Mike
Modern automatic transmissions are far better and efficient than manuals, 

Is that the case these days?  Given that autos are driving on compressed oil rather than direct drive, I'd have thought that the decades old status that they are a bit slower and use more gas, still applies?


Not I'm my experience the gearbox in my Nissan Altima is smooth never hunts for a gear, and definitely contributes to the average fuel consumption showing 6.4L/100 km.

My wifes' Skoda has a 7 speed DSG that is absolutely sweet, the best auto transmission if have ever experienced. It is an automatic twin clutch semi that works extremely efficiently.

Compared to what I had on HQ Holders etc and even 90's Commodores the modern autos are way way better than the old technology of manuals.





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  Reply # 1423043 8-Nov-2015 08:46
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"Best practice" method is handbrake.

Manual transmissions are lighter,cheaper, and easier to repair (also cheaper) but agree for normal driving purposes the automatics are just as good if not better for a smooth and comfortable travelling experience. All but a small sector of cars I would expect manuals will be all but obsolete in NZ soon. Just about are now.




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  Reply # 1423045 8-Nov-2015 08:56
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With a manual transmission the evergreen handbrake method is the best. It gives better control and protects the clutch plates.




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  Reply # 1423046 8-Nov-2015 08:59
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  • Put the handbrake on.
  • Put the car in gear.
  • Add a little bit of accelerator.
  • Let the clutch out until you start to feel it "bite" and you can feel the car pulling against the handbrake.  If you have an RPM gauge you should see the RPM drop.
  • Let the hand brake off gently.  The car should start to pull away.
  • Apply more accelerator gently.




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  Reply # 1423048 8-Nov-2015 09:12
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pdath:

 

  • Put the handbrake on.
  • Put the car in gear.
  • Add a little bit of accelerator.
  • Let the clutch out until you start to feel it "bite" and you can feel the car pulling against the handbrake.  If you have an RPM gauge you should see the RPM drop.
  • Let the hand brake off gently.  The car should start to pull away.
  • Apply more accelerator gently.


Ditto :-)

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  Reply # 1423078 8-Nov-2015 10:49
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What kind of question is this - the answer is practice until you can do it in your sleep. Whatever method you want to use.

The above method is best for beginners. If you are a shuttle driver/courier driver/formula 1 driver you could do without the handbrake. Also depends on how steep the hill is. Also depends on if the road is wet/gravel. Also depends on the car's clutch controllability. Also depends on how much torque the car engine has. etc etc etc

One thing: If you smell rubber you're doing it wrong. Prepare to pay for a new clutch if you keep doing it like that. Hopefully someone can teach you how to not kill your clutch.

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  Reply # 1423079 8-Nov-2015 10:49
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Manual? They still make those?





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