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Master Geek
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Topic # 200265 10-Aug-2016 18:18
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Hello -

 

 

 

My wife and I are pretty keen on a 2007 Honda Stream RSZ (secondhand).  At the moment we're having a bit of trouble deciding between two vehicles in similiar condition.

 

 

 

Honda Stream A:

 

92,000 Ks for $8,500

 

 

 

Honda Stream B:

 

78,000 for $13,000

 

 

 

We're both not car people, so we're having a bit of trouble deciding whether ~15,000ks is worth the price difference.  We're looking at keeping the car for at least 10 years (hopefully) - I'm unsure if the difference in Ks in 10 years time will make any difference in sale price.  

 

 

 

On the one hand, we only travel around 8,000Ks a year so there's about 3 years in difference for us in terms of distance traveled.  However, on the other, I'm finding it hard to quantify almost $5,000 difference between the two.

 

 

 

Looking for general guidance into what people think.  The Stream is chain driven so a cam-belt change will not need to be considered.

 

 

 

Thanks!


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  Reply # 1609787 10-Aug-2016 19:19
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15,000km is nothing really, a good Honda should easy last to 200,000km. My 2003 Corolla (which cost me $10K at 100,000km around 8 years ago, ex rental) is coming up on 200,000km and it's going just fine. That's a big price difference, if they're in similar condition I'd probably look at the cheaper one more seriously.

 

Note: not a car person either. I just put petrol in and drive, have it serviced, and if it breaks someone fixes it. Corolla has been really reliable. My Honda before that also very reliable.





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  Reply # 1609859 10-Aug-2016 21:51
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timmmay:

 

15,000km is nothing really, a good Honda should easy last to 200,000km. My 2003 Corolla (which cost me $10K at 100,000km around 8 years ago, ex rental) is coming up on 200,000km and it's going just fine. That's a big price difference, if they're in similar condition I'd probably look at the cheaper one more seriously.

 

Note: not a car person either. I just put petrol in and drive, have it serviced, and if it breaks someone fixes it. Corolla has been really reliable. My Honda before that also very reliable.

 

 

 

 

Thanks mate. Been talking to a few other people this evening and they seem to echo what you're saying.  Definitely the same with me - it's just a big metal box with 4 wheels.  Looking at starting a family (already have 2x dogs) soon so want the extra space it has to offer but not quite ready for a fully-fledged people mover just yet...


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  Reply # 1609868 10-Aug-2016 22:39
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See what is supposed to be done at 100000k and what that costs and factor that in, but otherwise look at the condiditon, the features and the colour of them. No point in saving a bit of cash if the car is an ugly one with the crap options.





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  Reply # 1609871 10-Aug-2016 22:51
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not that easy, it really depends on how the car has been treated and maintained ... but one will have no idea ... so in that sense, buy the vastly cheaper one :)





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  Reply # 1609875 10-Aug-2016 23:12
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14000km less is not worth a $4500 premium. Car A

Edit: I think I've found both cars listings.

I can see very little difference between them. Both are imported, both are the same colour, "car b" has a slightly sportier look. Other than that, "car a" is being sold by Turners and "car b" is a dealer.

Someone might be able to chime in regarding Turners.



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  Reply # 1609885 11-Aug-2016 00:53
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Would they have better consumer protection buying from a dealer, than from a auction, as that looks like it could be where the main price difference is?


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  Reply # 1609902 11-Aug-2016 06:43
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Turners selling a fresh import should give you CGA cover





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  Reply # 1609917 11-Aug-2016 08:31
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joker97:

 

Turners selling a fresh import should give you CGA cover

 

 

 

 

Awesome - hadn't considered CGA (just assumed it was there).  I'll make sure to clarify with them if we decide to pull the trigger.

 

 

 

Thanks to everyone else who has chimed in.  I'll have a chat to my mechanic around what kinda stuff is required at ~100,000; it'll have to be done anyway for either car so will be good to know.


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  Reply # 1610112 11-Aug-2016 14:12
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Assuming you're buying outright (rather than financing), one approach might be to buy the cheaper car "for the more expensive price."  By which I mean bank the difference between the two in a savings account, to hedge against any mechanical defects or servicing costs that you might incur with the car with higher mileage.  If nothing goes wrong by the time the car's done another 14,000kms, then you've got a bonus $5k, and if something does go wrong then you've got a nice little slush fund to pay for repairs.  All up, you're no worse off than buying the more expensive option, but potentially save a lot of money.


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  Reply # 1610147 11-Aug-2016 14:50
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Ask the seller on both whether or not the cambelt (and waterpump) have been replaced or not. There is a chance the engine has a timing chain instead of a cambelt and factor this potential cost in.

 

If the engine has a belt, rather than a chain you could be looking at $500 plus for the cambelt work to be done.

 

As a general rule, cambelts usually should be replaced ever 5-6 years or every 80,000 - 90,000 kms.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1610163 11-Aug-2016 15:18
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chain driven so thats not an issue


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