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Topic # 153578 1-Oct-2014 21:28
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Isnt the new vodafone ad that says

 

"with the new red plus plan you will have so much data you could reach the end of the internet"

Isnt that a bit misleading since it is a limited amount of data, and it doesnt say anything like

You won't actually be able to reach the end of the internet

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  Reply # 1145185 1-Oct-2014 22:29
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Out of curiosity I looked up red plus after seeing the advert.

Looks like start price point is $99 and that's for 2.5 gigs in month, hmm, big price for data that reaches end of internet.

Looks more like it's for someone that wants to talk heaps to NZ or Aussie then use data. Bigger data packs but price sky rockets according.

I guess ad just saying bigger data packs available, but if only interested in data doesn't claim to be value for money,

as for reaching end of internet, think adverts don't have to be factual, like Tui having female models guarding the beer.

Edit: Another one "V gives you wings"

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  Reply # 1145189 1-Oct-2014 22:39
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rugrat: Out of curiosity I looked up red plus after seeing the advert.

Looks like start price point is $99 and that's for 2.5 gigs in month ...


With a 2.5g gigs data allowance, the end of the internet will be reached quite quickly.




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  Reply # 1145190 1-Oct-2014 22:42
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Open term Red will cost you $99 for 5GB





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  Reply # 1145193 1-Oct-2014 22:45
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And especially since it's 4G I could eat that in literally hours providing speeds and conditions are good.
I think the vodafone ad is a bit silly but there have been worse marketing.





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  Reply # 1145194 1-Oct-2014 22:48
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This is know as puffery

 

Puffery

 

Exaggerations which are so obvious that they are unlikely to mislead anyone are known as 'puffery'. Humorous and imaginative advertisements often use this technique. Often no objective test can be used to determine their truth, or the statements are obvious exaggerations.

 

The Fair Trading Act allows some leeway when statements are clearly puffery. This is because most reasonable consumers are aware that some exaggeration occurs in advertising. Businesses should still take care when making such claims, however, as even if a claim is a clear exaggeration, it may breach the Act if it causes consumers to be misled.

 

Statements that appear to relate to facts rather than opinion, particularly about quality and price (such as that a product is 'the fastest' or 'the most economical') will breach the Act if they are not accurate. The more factual or seemingly factual a claim is, the greater the risk it will breach the Act if it is misleading or deceptive.


http://www.comcom.govt.nz/fair-trading/fair-trading-act-fact-sheets/jargon-exaggerations-and-puffery/


I think this is perfectly fine and legal, as it is unlikely anybody will be mislead,and think that they can "download" the entire internet on there cell phone.

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  Reply # 1145203 1-Oct-2014 22:54
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Scott3: This is know as puffery

Puffery Exaggerations which are so obvious that they are unlikely to mislead anyone are known as 'puffery'. Humorous and imaginative advertisements often use this technique. Often no objective test can be used to determine their truth, or the statements are obvious exaggerations. The Fair Trading Act allows some leeway when statements are clearly puffery. This is because most reasonable consumers are aware that some exaggeration occurs in advertising. Businesses should still take care when making such claims, however, as even if a claim is a clear exaggeration, it may breach the Act if it causes consumers to be misled. Statements that appear to relate to facts rather than opinion, particularly about quality and price (such as that a product is 'the fastest' or 'the most economical') will breach the Act if they are not accurate. The more factual or seemingly factual a claim is, the greater the risk it will breach the Act if it is misleading or deceptive.


http://www.comcom.govt.nz/fair-trading/fair-trading-act-fact-sheets/jargon-exaggerations-and-puffery/


I think this is perfectly fine and legal, as it is unlikely anybody will be mislead,and think that they can "download" the entire internet on there cell phone.


 it only needs one person.




Common sense is not as common as you think.


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  Reply # 1145247 2-Oct-2014 02:26
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vexxxboy:
Scott3: This is know as puffery

Puffery Exaggerations which are so obvious that they are unlikely to mislead anyone are known as 'puffery'. Humorous and imaginative advertisements often use this technique. Often no objective test can be used to determine their truth, or the statements are obvious exaggerations. The Fair Trading Act allows some leeway when statements are clearly puffery. This is because most reasonable consumers are aware that some exaggeration occurs in advertising. Businesses should still take care when making such claims, however, as even if a claim is a clear exaggeration, it may breach the Act if it causes consumers to be misled. Statements that appear to relate to facts rather than opinion, particularly about quality and price (such as that a product is 'the fastest' or 'the most economical') will breach the Act if they are not accurate. The more factual or seemingly factual a claim is, the greater the risk it will breach the Act if it is misleading or deceptive.


http://www.comcom.govt.nz/fair-trading/fair-trading-act-fact-sheets/jargon-exaggerations-and-puffery/


I think this is perfectly fine and legal, as it is unlikely anybody will be mislead,and think that they can "download" the entire internet on there cell phone.


 it only needs one person.


It's not a matter of if that person exists, it's a matter of where and how long before they start complaining that they couldn't download the internet.




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Stefan Andres Charsley

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  Reply # 1145248 2-Oct-2014 03:34
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Scott3: This is know as puffery

Puffery Exaggerations which are so obvious that they are unlikely to mislead anyone are known as 'puffery'. Humorous and imaginative advertisements often use this technique. Often no objective test can be used to determine their truth, or the statements are obvious exaggerations. The Fair Trading Act allows some leeway when statements are clearly puffery. This is because most reasonable consumers are aware that some exaggeration occurs in advertising. Businesses should still take care when making such claims, however, as even if a claim is a clear exaggeration, it may breach the Act if it causes consumers to be misled. Statements that appear to relate to facts rather than opinion, particularly about quality and price (such as that a product is 'the fastest' or 'the most economical') will breach the Act if they are not accurate. The more factual or seemingly factual a claim is, the greater the risk it will breach the Act if it is misleading or deceptive.


http://www.comcom.govt.nz/fair-trading/fair-trading-act-fact-sheets/jargon-exaggerations-and-puffery/


I think this is perfectly fine and legal, as it is unlikely anybody will be mislead,and think that they can "download" the entire internet on there cell phone.


And the fact that they say 'could' in the sentence. It is difference between "we sell the fastest computer on the market" vs. "we sell one of the fastest computers on the market".




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  Reply # 1145251 2-Oct-2014 06:04
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Much ado about nothing. It's harmless.




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  Reply # 1145259 2-Oct-2014 06:16
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Dont worry, if anyone actually believes the ad then, most likely, they wont be capable of using a smartphone to find out.

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  Reply # 1145265 2-Oct-2014 06:52
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The end is nigh!

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  Reply # 1145469 2-Oct-2014 11:14
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I tried to find the end of the internet the other day...all I found was Russian Gangsters selling all manner of things...including leprechauns. And here I was thinking all this time that leprechauns only lived at the end of rainbows....hmmm...the internet is a dangerous place right at the end there...




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  Reply # 1145521 2-Oct-2014 12:34
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  Reply # 1146001 2-Oct-2014 20:15
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Scott3: This is know as puffery

Puffery Exaggerations which are so obvious that they are unlikely to mislead anyone are known as 'puffery'. Humorous and imaginative advertisements often use this technique. Often no objective test can be used to determine their truth, or the statements are obvious exaggerations. The Fair Trading Act allows some leeway when statements are clearly puffery. This is because most reasonable consumers are aware that some exaggeration occurs in advertising. Businesses should still take care when making such claims, however, as even if a claim is a clear exaggeration, it may breach the Act if it causes consumers to be misled. Statements that appear to relate to facts rather than opinion, particularly about quality and price (such as that a product is 'the fastest' or 'the most economical') will breach the Act if they are not accurate. The more factual or seemingly factual a claim is, the greater the risk it will breach the Act if it is misleading or deceptive.


http://www.comcom.govt.nz/fair-trading/fair-trading-act-fact-sheets/jargon-exaggerations-and-puffery/


I think this is perfectly fine and legal, as it is unlikely anybody will be mislead,and think that they can "download" the entire internet on there cell phone.


The biggest question is

where would you store it??




 The views expressed by me are not necessarily those of my employer


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  Reply # 1146010 2-Oct-2014 20:24
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hyperman:
Scott3: This is know as puffery

Puffery Exaggerations which are so obvious that they are unlikely to mislead anyone are known as 'puffery'. Humorous and imaginative advertisements often use this technique. Often no objective test can be used to determine their truth, or the statements are obvious exaggerations. The Fair Trading Act allows some leeway when statements are clearly puffery. This is because most reasonable consumers are aware that some exaggeration occurs in advertising. Businesses should still take care when making such claims, however, as even if a claim is a clear exaggeration, it may breach the Act if it causes consumers to be misled. Statements that appear to relate to facts rather than opinion, particularly about quality and price (such as that a product is 'the fastest' or 'the most economical') will breach the Act if they are not accurate. The more factual or seemingly factual a claim is, the greater the risk it will breach the Act if it is misleading or deceptive.


http://www.comcom.govt.nz/fair-trading/fair-trading-act-fact-sheets/jargon-exaggerations-and-puffery/


I think this is perfectly fine and legal, as it is unlikely anybody will be mislead,and think that they can "download" the entire internet on there cell phone.


The biggest question is

where would you store it??


Reading the OP carefully it says "reach" the end... And I'd say that the end is the beginning is the end... 20mb should easily enable me to reach anyplace on the internet?

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