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13 posts

Geek


Topic # 11927 19-Feb-2007 10:48
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Gahh. i am fustrated. I have been trying and trying and trying very hard to fix my lag problem.... but noooo, nothing will budge.
in that case, i call in you guys ^.^  You have probably already guessed why i am here, its very easy to figure out. my games lag and i need help. Someone help me! Im a very noobish geek.

For example, i only know that i have a good proccesor and a good video card, but my games still lag. I paly multiplayer online games, so when i have a high ping and i am not sending/recieving enough packets, the games either kick me, or i get killed easily.

I checked my wireless network status and i find that i only have about 6,000 - 10,000 Mbps sent and like 9,000 to 12,000 recieved.

Whats happening???!?!?!?!?!??

Heres some info:

I have 2 pentium 4 processor 3.06 GHz,
I have comcast wirless connection (linksys wireless-G USB Network adaptor),
one Harddrive,

and thats about it. Im not even sure if i gave the info correctly, if u need more info about my system post back or message... please !!!Yell

Sum more stuff to say: in the games i either spike (have high ping), and the other peoples characters freeze, or the game says i have packet loss, or i get a connection interupted sign.

Thankz!


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BDFL - Memuneh
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Reply # 61197 19-Feb-2007 10:58
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Welcome to Geekone... The very first thing I would to is to use a wired (ethernet) connection to test. Wireless is great but for sensitive applications such as online games there are lots going on in terms of interference, signal strength, etc...








13 posts

Geek


  Reply # 61204 19-Feb-2007 12:43
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k. we had that at the beginning when we bought the linksys router, etc., but now my comp is too far away to be hooked up.

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 61234 19-Feb-2007 15:14
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Personally I wouldn't try on-line games over wireless. Although I haven't even tried it I have read about too many issues to even try it.

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Geek


  Reply # 62672 3-Mar-2007 15:38
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I play games over wireless and my personal connection is only about 10m away with 2 walls and a fridge inbetween so its not the best but basically gaming over wifi sucks (slingshot adds to that too :X) as hte ping itself is only about 5-10ish (got it to the bes)possible I could with a bit of tweaking :P ) but yeah try doing over lan if you could first as it may be your connection as well!



13 posts

Geek


  Reply # 62882 5-Mar-2007 19:13
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yeah, my config and settings are basically same as yours, 2 walls, one bed. i went to Best Buy today and checked out the Cat5 cables. there were lots, and even cat6 cables. didnt know waht to get. my dad said ishould cuz it would look ugly running through the hallyways. and we have a wire from when we bought our routers, dunno if its cat w/e. its..... think and ... nvm, its not.

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 63111 7-Mar-2007 19:02
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Goto Command Prompt

Try

Ping www.xnet.co.nz -t

The -t option pings the host until stopped

Swap www.xnet.co.nz for your ISP or other host that accepts Pings. If they accept pings then you will get a reply.

If the game you play is fast action eg BF2 or COD you need a ping less than 200ms.

Leave the command prompt open and then play the game see what happens.

Last resort, if the carpet has been down for a year or more then you can lift the carpet and put cable down near the edging.

eg
C:\Documents and Settings\Me>ping www.xnet.co.nz -t

Pinging umbriel.wxnz.net [58.28.4.10] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 58.28.4.10: bytes=32 time=43ms TTL=60
Reply from 58.28.4.10: bytes=32 time=43ms TTL=60
Reply from 58.28.4.10: bytes=32 time=44ms TTL=60
Reply from 58.28.4.10: bytes=32 time=43ms TTL=60
Reply from 58.28.4.10: bytes=32 time=44ms TTL=60
Reply from 58.28.4.10: bytes=32 time=43ms TTL=60

Ping statistics for 58.28.4.10:
    Packets: Sent = 6, Received = 6, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 43ms, Maximum = 44ms, Average = 43ms
Control-C
^C






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Geek


  Reply # 63113 7-Mar-2007 19:20
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what do u mean by goto command promp, and whats with the ping www.xnet.co.nz -t   i went to www.xnet.co.nz but from there on, please be more specific >.< sorry! thanks!



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Geek


  Reply # 63114 7-Mar-2007 19:23
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i went to C:\Documents and Settings\Me> .. but then what? do i create a folder with the name www.xnet.co.nz -t?

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Geek


  Reply # 63117 7-Mar-2007 19:35
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for you use google.com as it would be more local

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 63118 7-Mar-2007 19:36
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Ok Command Prompt or DOS Prompt

Get there by clicking Start Button (lower Left usually)

Click Run..

Type CMD

Click Ok

Then type the following in the black box

Ping www.google.com -t

Leave this window open and see what happens






13 posts

Geek


  Reply # 63158 8-Mar-2007 12:21
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ok thx, im doing that right now... i knew how to get to start.... lol. ^.^ thx for help, i will go on my game while runnig n that now. but i dont get whats the difference between google.com and xnet. why do i have to insert websites in that space? waht does that do? if it isn't too much of a hassle, please explain. Smile

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 63167 8-Mar-2007 13:23
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www.google.com and www.xnet.co.nz are addresses similar to house addresses

www.google.com is most likely closer to you and also a much bigger house than www.xnet.co.nz and has more driveways.


Definition for ping below

http://kb.iu.edu/data/aopu.html

What is ping?

Ping is a program that sends a series of packets over a network or the Internet to a specific computer in order to generate a response from that computer. The other computer responds with an acknowledgment that it received the packets. Ping was created to verify whether a specific computer on a network or the Internet exists, and is connected.

Some have claimed that the word "ping" is actually an acronym for "Packet Internet (or Inter-Network) Groper", deliberately contrived to play on the fact that pinging with a computer is similar to what submariners do with sonar. Both the computer and the submarine's sonar send out a "ping", in the form of either a series of packets or a brief burst of sound. The ping "bounces" off the target and then returns to let you know the target is there.

Ping is both a noun and a verb, e.g., "Ping that computer", or "the router didn't return a ping".

Ping is built into almost every network-capable operating system. To ping a computer, go to a command prompt and enter ping , a space, and then the network or Internet address you wish to contact. For example, enter the following at a Windows XP command prompt:

ping 66.218.71.198

You should get a response similar to this:

pinging 66.218.71.198 with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 66.218.71.198: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=127 Reply from 66.218.71.198: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=127 Reply from 66.218.71.198: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=127 Reply from 66.218.71.198: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=127 ping statistics for 66.218.71.198: Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

Operating systems format their ping results differently. For example, following is what the result looks like from a Linux computer:

ping 66.218.71.198 (66.218.71.198) 56(84) bytes of data. 64 bytes from 66.218.71.198: icmp_seq=1 ttl=254 time=0.644 ms 64 bytes from 66.218.71.198: icmp_seq=2 ttl=254 time=0.510 ms 64 bytes from 66.218.71.198: icmp_seq=3 ttl=254 time=0.584 ms 64 bytes from 66.218.71.198: icmp_seq=4 ttl=254 time=0.535 ms --- 66.218.71.198 PING statistics --- 4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3000ms rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.510/0.568/0.644/0.053 ms

Regardless of the operating system, the results will show the IP address of the computer you're pinging, the round-trip time in milliseconds for each packet, the number of packets sent and received, and the number and percentage of how many packets got lost.

Technical information

Ping uses ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) packets. The packet from the origin computer is called an "ICMP_echo_request", and the response from the target is called an "ICMP_echo_reply". Each packet contains by default either 32 or 64 bytes of data and 8 bytes of protocol reader information, but ping can be configured at the command line to use different sized packets. You can access a list of switches and additional functions by invoking the help file for ping:

  • In Windows, at the command prompt, enter ping /? .

  • In Unix-based systems (e.g., Mac OS X and later, Linux, Solaris), at the command prompt enter ping --help .

Also see:






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