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Topic # 66174 13-Aug-2010 21:56
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I am in the early stages of planning a new house build and I plan to do the telecommunications work myself including running Cat6 , installing a home distribution box, all cable terminations etc.

As such, I have been reading up on the TCF Premises Wiring Code of Practice which is available on the Telecommunications Carriers Forum website.

Nothing there that phases me except these two paragraphs:

27.10.6
Requirement to connect to Local Access Provider’s Network an installation should bear a label issued by a qualified installer that the installation complies with this Code of Practice and with AS/NZS 15018. Refer testing and labelling.

Only a certified cabling system should be connected to a network provider’s access network (Section 106 of the Telecommunications Act 2001).

Now, I am not a qualified installer and although I planned to get a low cost link tester to do Verification tests for continuity, crossed pairs, reversed pairs etc I certainly didn't plan on doing any Qualification testing (as per section 49 of the TCF COP)

I guess my question is how stringent are the Network Providers (eg Telecom) with the requirement that the structured cabling install be certified?




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  Reply # 367483 14-Aug-2010 10:28
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Hi, I would not loose sleep about this issue, important things are that you use the guide sensibly, ie observe what it says especially safety related issues such as clearace of LV(230V) cabling etc. If you dont think your knowledge or practical (construction) ability within what the standard outlines, then get someone else who is capable to do it.

I have a Fluke CableIQ as the report in the TCF shows, it set me back around $2800 a couple of years back and is a very valuable tool and earns its keep every day of the working week. But a basic wire map tester should be fine, I assume all your lines will be 25-30 meters max.

As for qualified personal having certified the installation, I was not aware that there was such a requirement in NZ, there is in Aus, however to work on commercial installations it is normally required that installers have certification with one of the recognized structured cabling vendors that comply with AS/NZ3080 etal, I have mine with Krone, a course will set you back around $500 and take 3-4days varies from vendor to vendor, hardest part is getting on the courses, they are not run that regularly, and you must redo the course every 3yrs to stay current.

As far as I am aware, a home owner is still allowed to do their own home phone wiring, and as such you can still do "structured cabling" in you own home.

Cyril



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  Reply # 367713 15-Aug-2010 01:41
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Thanks Cyril.  To be honest I didn't think it would be an issue.  I was present when the Chorus tech connected our phone lead-in at the ETP for our present house.   He never asked me anything at all about the structured cabling in the house.

I think I will give it a go myself.  I am sure I can do a better job than the local sparkies who did my present house. 

Cable runs in the vicinity of 15 average with longest 20m.

Q1. Cat 6 or 5e?
Q2. adsl or vdsl2 filter?

Cheers
James




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  Reply # 367728 15-Aug-2010 08:08
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ADSL filters are now obsolete (manufacturer no longer makes them) and have been replaced with VDSL ones. There are huge numbers of ADSL ones on Trademe as it seems people picked them up super cheaply as stocks were cleared and are now making a few $$ from them.


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  Reply # 367734 15-Aug-2010 08:59
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Don't worry about that section to much you won't get rejected if it's not done by a certified installer, excellent that you read it though and I wish there where more like you, it is a set of guide lines and practices we want the industry to adopt that give the sec we recommend that new installations adopt, it makes it easier when connecting Telco services.

If you do it yourself then the onus is on you and your quality of work, bad terminations effect performance, doesn't matter that that the wire map is correct the performance lowers with poorer connections.

Generally Cat5e will be fine unless your planning on running Gig around the house :)




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  Reply # 367735 15-Aug-2010 09:01
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Generally Cat5e will be fine unless your planning on running Gig around the house :)


Dont you mean 10GigE, never had a cat5e run yet that does not shape up to pass GigE.

Cyril

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  Reply # 367740 15-Aug-2010 09:57
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Oh, and if it were me I would simply go for cat5e, its easier to run (thinner, and less stingent turn radius requirements) and getting real your house is not a data centre, even though you may have this way in the future ideal, I doubt we will see the need for 10GigE in a house for a looong time yet, but hey its your decision, cat6 is about 50% dearer, and requires cat6 cable, keystones and patch panels.

And as steve says, fit a VDSL2 filter, they are the same cost (unless you take the fire sale ADSL filters in to account) and provide seemless migration of your setup to VDSL2 when Telecom finally release it.

On that, anyone have a more firm date on VDSL2 public release, it seems to have dragged on for some time, Maverick got any idea, something makes me think next month.

Cyril



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  Reply # 367742 15-Aug-2010 10:06
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Ok, so will use a vdsl2 filter and cat5e. Next question.....

I plan to use PDL 600 series mechs. Do you recommend the PDL RJ45 keystones? What brand do you use for domestic install?

I can't actually find a PDL cat5e RJ45 keystone only a Cat6 rated one (619MD).

Obviously will need to use a PDL 619MKC keystone clip module.




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  Reply # 367745 15-Aug-2010 10:07
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cyril7:

On that, anyone have a more firm date on VDSL2 public release, it seems to have dragged on for some time, Maverick got any idea, something makes me think next month.

Cyril


Nope ... sorry




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  Reply # 367748 15-Aug-2010 10:12
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I use Signet ST020WH (or BK/black) for domestic jobs, retail is around $5ea if not less, never had one fail on me. For commercial I normally use either Molex or Krone.

And yes all the above except the Krone will go into the standard 619MCK, for the Krone use the Krone specific PDL clip, its around the same price, and will fit all Keystones as mentioned above.

Cyril



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  Reply # 367784 15-Aug-2010 12:06
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maverick: Don't worry about that section to much you won't get rejected if it's not done by a certified installer, excellent that you read it though and I wish there where more like you, it is a set of guide lines and practices we want the industry to adopt that give the sec we recommend that new installations adopt, it makes it easier when connecting Telco services.


Thanks for your feedback Maverick.  I actually emailed a copy of the older PTC106 to the sparky who did the structured cabling install at my current house.  I have no doubt in my mind that he never bothered to read it.

Had a skyTV tech here the other day installing a 2nd decoder (multiroom).  His opinion was that you only need 1x RJ45 behind the main TV and dont bother with any RJ45's behind any other TV locations as they only ever connect the main sky decoder to the telephone line.  When I mentioned future proofing for IR and IPTV a blank look came across his face.  He obviously hasn't read the TCF premises Wiring COP either.

This is why I plan to do the install myself.  I reckon that I can do a better job than most other people in this town, and save $ in the process.

Question time (just building & checking my knowledge).....

I know that Krone IDC blocks are slightly different (45° contacts) to 110 IDC blocks.  I have read that you can use a Krone punchdown tool to terminate into 110 IDC's. Is this correct?

Can you use a 110 tool to terminate into Krone IDC's? 

To be honest I probably wont have any Krone IDC's, I am just curious.

Cheers everybody for your advice.




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  Reply # 367786 15-Aug-2010 12:13
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Some Keystone IDC headers simply dont like being worked by one tool or the other, but by and large you can use either, I would say 110 will work with most, they just are no good on Krone modules (Blocks) as used in MDFs, if you go with the Signet and Molex ones mentioned above work with 110.

Cyril



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  Reply # 367801 15-Aug-2010 13:14
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So...next question......

Do you use a UTP cable stripper? 

In the video below the guy strips off the PVC sheath (using scissors) and uses the pull string to strip more PVC sheath.  He then cuts off the 4prs slightly below the point where he first scored the PVC sheath.  He does this to guard against any knicks in the pairs (possibly) made by the initial removal of the PVC sheath.

Overkill or sound practice?












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  Reply # 367857 15-Aug-2010 15:32
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I have never used a specific stripper, I just use a sharp pen knife (blade knife) and score around the sheath without going right through the sheath, bit of practice and its easy, then bend the cable at the score and it will break.

Cyril



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  Reply # 367866 15-Aug-2010 15:46
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So i guess the trick is to not score the sheath all the way through.  That way you dont have to worry about knicking any of the twisted pairs.  Cool, thanks Cyril

Ok, think I have data cabling side of this sorted (for now)......so change of tack here to RF install. This is the part that scares me.

I have 4 rooms that I want to run RG6 to, one of which is the family room (main tv viewing area) that has the possibility of two TV positions. So all up I will have 5 TV locations.

I plan to run 2x RG6 from the sky dish and 1x R6 from UHF aerial (for freeview).  Thus each tv location will have minimum 3x F connectors.  In the main living room (with two possible tv positions) I will run an extra RG6 to both positions.  This extra RG6 will be in case I wish to distribute TV around to the other locations. In all probability it will never get used but easier to put it in before gib is on.

The RG6 from dish/aerial will terminate in the comms cupboard (same place as data).  RG6 feeds from all tv locations will also terminate in the comms cupboard.

I will need 3x 5-way splitters (if they are available, if not, 6-way splitter with a 75ohm F terminator is screwed onto the unused port), that is one splitter for each feed from the roof.  The run from the dish/aerial location is 15m to the comms cupboard.  The longest run from the comms cupboard out to the tv locations is 15m again. 

I reckon I might have signal issues with a 30m run and the signal being split 5 ways.  Thoughts?

Need an signal amplifier?

 




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  Reply # 367899 15-Aug-2010 17:10
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Hi, I recommend (and I think thats what you have planned).

Two feeds from dish to comms cupboard, one from UHF.

4 runs to main TV in lounge (same to 2nd location if you might move it).

Two runs to each bedroom, I recommend one finish at a high wall height where a wall mount TV goes for freeview TVs, and the 2nd to a normal low point (250-300mm off floor) for a potential sky decoder with draw wires up and down that wall.

In the main lounge I presuem you will have your MySky/Sky decoder, and feed RF from there, combine with UHF antenna in comms cupboard, then use a amp (Kingray SA162F) to feed a splitter and distribute the combined UHF antenna feed and Sky RF feed to all rooms.  If you split more than 3-4ways then you can be sure you will need an amp to assist with making up for that loss, the SA162F is ideal for this, it has approx 15dB gain which is all you need to make up for line and splitter loss.

That way in each bedroom you have a UHF feed to provide FreeView and Sky analog. You also have a feed for a Sky box in each bedroom should you wish.

Cyril

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