Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


116 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 4

Trusted

Topic # 89007 24-Aug-2011 20:03
Send private message

Sorry if this belongs in another section.

Small and high gain are probably exclusive.
I would settle for just directional.

I am working on a project that could do with a tight 2.4ghz beam. :)

Found these, 30,33dbi
http://www.zdacomm.com/2-4-ghz-gird-parabolic-dish-antenna-high-gain-seires.html
http://www.radiolabs.com/products/antennas/2.4gig/stage6.php

So in theory how tight could a beam be made?
1 Wavelength?

Is there another way to form the beam, say fire it down a tube?
Wave propergation is not my strong point.

Any help appreciated Laughing




Create new topic


116 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 4

Trusted

  Reply # 511585 25-Aug-2011 08:14
Send private message

After some reading I have a few things to try.

Math_Physics_Bardwell_v2
http://www.connect802.com/download/techpubs/2008/my_chauffeur_BD0414.pdf

Carbon is a great absorber of microwave at 2.4ghz.
This is just what I need
http://www.lessemf.com/fabric.html

But I will give some antistatic mats a try.
Hopefully they have a high enough carbon content to be useful without having to use too much.

Reflection could be an issue even if  I manage to get a beam but sine we will be out in the wild hopefully it will be less of an issue.

Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.