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138 posts

Master Geek


Topic # 92606 2-Nov-2011 23:09
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Hi Geekzoners,

I am looking for some advice on a Networking Address Scheme to use in my Workshop. I will be setting up a Call Centre network which must use a single network. Initially it will have 2 servers, but must be able to expand to 10 servers and 300 workstations in the future without changing the addressing scheme.

Server#1 is the domain controller running Windows Server 2008 with the following services installed:
  • DNS for the Call Centre
  • DHCP for the Call Centre workstations
  • SMB for documents
  • IIS to host the Intranet site 
Server#2 will be the gateway to the internet and will run WIndows Server 2008 with the following installed:
  • Routing and Remote Access to allow internet access and incoming VPN

Network Diagram 
My question is what would be the best addressing scheme to use? I will be using private ranges but should I use Class B with default mask (1 network with 65534 hosts), Class B with subnet mask 255.255.254.0 /23 (128 subnets and 510 hosts) or Class C supernetted with mask 255.255.254.0 /23 (2 subnets with 510 hosts)?

I have posted the Scenario and requirements on Google+ (click here for link to post) but what I am after is:
  • Network Address
  • Subnet Mask
  • Broadcast Address
  • Gateway Address
  • Number of IP Addresses available on the network
  • IP Address range for servers (Upto 10 and must be contiguous)
  • IP Address range for workstations
If I use a Class B private address of 172.25.0.0 /16 then is this right?
  • Network Address: 172.25.0.0
  • Subnet Mask: 255.255.0.0
  • Broadcast Address: 172.25.255.255
  • Gateway Address: 172.25.0.1
  • Number of available IP Addresses: 65,534
  • IP Address Range for Servers: 172.25.0.2 - 172.25.0.21
  • IP Address Range for Workstations: 172.25.0.22 - 172.25.255.254
Is this the best practise or should I make the whole of the fourth octet available for servers even though I am only required to plan for 10? Is it better to have unused Hosts or unused Subnets?

I sort of understand subnetting and how it works (I am in week 4 of my Network Engineering Diploma) but I am still unsure of how to apply it in real life situations.

I am truly grateful for any help received.

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 540534 2-Nov-2011 23:47
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Lol I hope they are teaching you IPv6 aswell! I presume it's not a VOIP system either?

Firstly do not use 2008 as a router, it is not designed to do this. Use a proper routing platform as a router. 

In terms of IP addressing easiest would be something like:

Ipv4:

Main Subnet: 10.x.x.x 

Give each subnet a /16 subnet which will give you 255 subnets and enough hosts on each. Also dealing with /8, /16 or /24 subnets is a hell of a lot easier than other length masks.

E.g.:

10.1.0.0/16
10.2.0.0/16
10.3.0.0/16

In terms of IPv6 each subnet should be /64 and you should request a /56 from your ISP which will give you oodles of subnets.

With VPNs  take a look at Microsoft Direct Access as its heaps better than using standard PPTP VPNs where you can have issues if the network your connecting from has the same private addressing scheme in terms of IPv4







138 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 540542 3-Nov-2011 00:31
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Thanks Zeon. The scenario for the workshop sets what will be used, hence 2008 being used for routing. It is also quite a basic network setup with only workstations and servers. I will only be connecting 1 workstation to the network, first to the switch, then by VPN. A requirement of the scenario is to have only 1 network which is why I figured that the easiest way would be to just use a private Class B address with no subnetting. That would give me 1 network with more than enough hosts. IPv6 was really only touched on in the study guide but no mention was made to it in terms of subnetting. Looks like I will have to research it in my own time. And thanks for the tip on VPNs. I might set up the test machine to use the same private address scheme to test the tutors knowledge.
So for a single network, would I get away with using a private class b address with no subnetting?

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  Reply # 540545 3-Nov-2011 01:28
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k1w33d: Thanks Zeon. The scenario for the workshop sets what will be used, hence 2008 being used for routing. It is also quite a basic network setup with only workstations and servers. I will only be connecting 1 workstation to the network, first to the switch, then by VPN. A requirement of the scenario is to have only 1 network which is why I figured that the easiest way would be to just use a private Class B address with no subnetting. That would give me 1 network with more than enough hosts. IPv6 was really only touched on in the study guide but no mention was made to it in terms of subnetting. Looks like I will have to research it in my own time. And thanks for the tip on VPNs. I might set up the test machine to use the same private address scheme to test the tutors knowledge.
So for a single network, would I get away with using a private class b address with no subnetting?


Let them (your course people) know by the time you "get a job" there will be no IPv4 addresses available and they should really be teaching you IPv6 at the same time and set up your network with IPv6/IPv4 at the same time.

Also as Zeon said  .. using a windows box as a router is possible yes but not really the standard in the "real world" and a proper router should be used really. A Cost of a cheap router could be a lot cheaper than a windows box and do a lot better.  (Sorry your network went down as our router got a Virus)

I wonder why they teach like this when people get a job after all of this training it will be completely different

 

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