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Topic # 198369 6-Jul-2016 11:30
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Anyone have a heat pump clothes dryer they've bought and recommend?

 

Our current dryer is shot. After a heat pump dryer to replace it, around the 8-9kg capacity. I'm aware they are more expensive than traditional condenser dryers, but based on the life of the dryer I will save that in energy costs anyways.

 

Preference would be to wall mount it above the washing machine like our current dryer, but can sit on floor if needed.

 

??

 

...actually preference a heat pump condenser dryer - I think that means its a steam dryer too, so good for removing wrinkles coz ironing sux!


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  Reply # 1587262 6-Jul-2016 19:33
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We brought an AEG heat pump dryer round 2 years ago never had a problem. Meile and Bosch also had good reviews.


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  Reply # 1587263 6-Jul-2016 19:39
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You could double down - make sure your drier has a timer, get Flick electric, and run your drier at 2am. Instead of 20+c/kwh you could pay as little as 5c/kwh, depending on your location.





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  Reply # 1587270 6-Jul-2016 20:09
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I've got a Samsung heat pump dryer (around 1 year old) and it is excellent. Paid a fortune for it however. The dryer had a fault when I first bought it but Samsung were incredibly quick with resolving it and since then never had a single issue. I normally set a timer and have it dry at 2am, clothes come out wrinkle free (including dress shirts) meaning I actually don't have to iron all too much anymore either.

Am on Flick Electric. I estimated doing a full load of drying works out to around 25c worth of power when done at off-peak with me.

I would well recommend one if you're using the dryer all the time.




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  Reply # 1587271 6-Jul-2016 20:13
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How does it make clothes wrinkle free? Keep on going?

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  Reply # 1587274 6-Jul-2016 20:27
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joker97: How does it make clothes wrinkle free? Keep on going?


Voodoo magic IIRC. It spins the chamber every few minutes while the clothes are cooling down whilst airing it out but it works really well.




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  Reply # 1587316 6-Jul-2016 21:30
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My parents have a Bosch one. It seems to work really well. IIRC they don't recommend wall mounting as they are quite a bit heavier than a traditional dryer. There doesn't seem to be a way to hook it up to the drain so you don't need to empty the water tank all the time either, which would be a nice feature.


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  Reply # 1587318 6-Jul-2016 21:33
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My LG condensor one has a hose that either goes into the tank at the top or to a drain, it pumps at some stage of the drying cycle. I cant believe that there were some condensor ones that do not have that, since it makes it have the opposite problem of a coffee machine with having to carry water around a house like some form of uncivilized peasant.





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  Reply # 1587353 6-Jul-2016 22:19
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Actually now I've googled it, it appears you can buy a hose accessory for this, it just doesn't come with the dryer.


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  Reply # 1587363 6-Jul-2016 22:30
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FWIW, we're currently considering a similar issue and we're leaning towards a gas-fired dryer. Used them overseas and they were great - and super cheap to run if you we already on reticulated gas. Range here is pretty poor compared to overseas though so there isn't much choice - pretty much heavy commercial or light commercial. This is the brand we're looking at: http://www.home-laundry.speedqueen.co.nz/ Price seems comparable to a lower end heat pump unit.

 

Haven't actually taken the plunge yet so no first hand experience.

 

 


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  Reply # 1587380 6-Jul-2016 22:54
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If you're interested here is my unit - I have the stacking kit and just have it stacked on-top of my washing machine:

 

Click to see full size Click to see full size

 

The dryer has a smaller hose that just goes in with the washing machine hose to the basin. I've got both hoses going into the same drainage hole. Stacking kit is an extra $30 (bought my washer and dryer from Smiths City because, discount++) and it just stacks on-top of most Samsung front-loader washing machines.

 

The washing machine I've got is incredibly good - I think I paid $1100 for it and the dryer was around $2800 when I bought it last year. More or less went overkill (like everything I have got in this house). The washing machine is very quiet and the dryer is also quite quiet in comparison with the standard "belt + heater" dryers.





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  Reply # 1587383 6-Jul-2016 23:04
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Its just a shame that anything you can easily get at a decent price here is crippled by a 10A plug on them.





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  Reply # 1587404 7-Jul-2016 00:06
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I've just got a Miele one, like this http://www.miele.co.nz/domestic/tumble-dryers-1575.htm?mat=10076950&name=TKB_350_WP_Eco .  But I have yet to use it, as it is still in the box awaiting installation,  so can't comment on how good it is yet. But it was priced well compared to the other brands of heat pump condensor dryer, and Miele is a top brand, and so it should last many many years. My old F&P dryer was literally 40 years old, and was still going. The Miele has a flexible pipe at the back that you can hook into your drain. Don't think this model does the steam drying, as I think that model was an extra $1000, and didn't think it was worth that extra amount. The only problem I have found with Miele is their call centre is in Australia, and when you ask them a question, such as the space you need, they say 'we can't answer that for legal reasons', and refer me back to the brochure, which doesn't answer the question.


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  Reply # 1587408 7-Jul-2016 00:22
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timmmay:

 

You could double down - make sure your drier has a timer, get Flick electric, and run your drier at 2am. Instead of 20+c/kwh you could pay as little as 5c/kwh, depending on your location.

 

 

 

 

Hmm, interesting idea. They seem to be the new version of Powershop with competitive pricing. 


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  Reply # 1587414 7-Jul-2016 01:25
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richms:

 

Its just a shame that anything you can easily get at a decent price here is crippled by a 10A plug on them.

 

 

 

 

Yeah, It's a pain you can't get cheap style vented dryers in sizes bigger than 6-7kg without going commercial. (I did find this 10KG F&P dryer on trade me though - Needs 30A Link) Gas dryers are really rare here too, which is a surprise given the limitations of the 10A Plug. (In the USA a standard dryer plug is 30A @220V, and gas dryers are popular.)

 

 

 

The 10A Plug is no issue for the heat pump ones however. The Miele one linked above, uses a maximum of 1.1kw, a 10A plug is good of 2.3kW (@230V). Don't try to move that one on your own - 61KG!

 

 

 

I'm surprised there are so many (Non heat pump) condenser dryers on the market. By the sounds of it they are more expensive, slower, and less energy efficient than a vented dryer. If you can duct to outside, and don't want to spring for a heat pump unit avoid these. Of course you really should duct the vented dryers - They dump heaps of moisture and warmth into the room otherwise - perfect for mold.


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  Reply # 1587420 7-Jul-2016 06:59
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chimera:

 

Our current dryer is shot. After a heat pump dryer to replace it, around the 8-9kg capacity. I'm aware they are more expensive than traditional condenser dryers, but based on the life of the dryer I will save that in energy costs anyways.

 

 

the payback period is about 10 year if you are doing a load every day. That is compared to a standard vented dryer. the payback period is more if you only do a few loads a week. and even more if you do them once in a while because you use a close line.

 

consumer seems to think they are not yet worth it.


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