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hunny

2 posts

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#91598 16-Oct-2011 21:54
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I have a DVB-S2 freeview receiver connected to TV in lounge and want to be able watch on the TV in the bedroom as well. I understand that I have to watch the programme that is on the main TV.

What cables/splitter etc. do I need to do this and how do I do it?

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Deev8
481 posts

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  #534245 17-Oct-2011 12:26
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hunny: What cables/splitter etc. do I need to do this and how do I do it?

Knowing what you have, and what you use at the moment will help a lot.
  • What type of connectors does the Freeview box have?
  • What type of cable(s) do you use to connect it to the first TV (in the lounge) at present?
  • What type of connections does the second TV (in the bedroom) have available?

HDMI, Component Video with Stero Sound, Composite Video with Stereo Sound, S-Video, and SCART are some of the probable answers - though there might be others.

Jaxson
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  #534255 17-Oct-2011 12:38
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Lets add how far away is the 2nd TV to the list of questions too

 
 
 
 


hunny

2 posts

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  #534341 17-Oct-2011 15:58
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Deev8:
hunny: What cables/splitter etc. do I need to do this and how do I do it?

Knowing what you have, and what you use at the moment will help a lot.
  • What type of connectors does the Freeview box have?
The Freeview box is an Openbox S10 DVB S-2 which is able to pick up the Aussie channels
The connections are HDMI, the 3 AV (Red/White and Yellow), and it also has a Loop Out which a F-type connector can screw into (right next to the LNB In)
  • What type of cable(s) do you use to connect it to the first TV (in the lounge) at present?
I am using the HDMI cable to the Main TV
  • What type of connections does the second TV (in the bedroom) have available?
The 2nd TV has the 3 AV (Red/White and Yellow) and a RF aerial Inlet

I was wondering if I could connect a cable from the Loop Out on the Freeview and connect to the RF aerial cable (which has been disconected from the old TV aerial) with on of these
www.trademe.co.nz/electronics-photography/tvs/cables-aerials/auction-415484563.htm

Or am I completely worng?

The total length of cable from the Freeview box to the 2nd TV would be about 10 metres



HDMI, Component Video with Stero Sound, Composite Video with Stereo Sound, S-Video, and SCART are some of the probable answers - though there might be others.

JimmyH
2695 posts

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  #534478 17-Oct-2011 21:11
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If the second TV only has Composite AV connectors (ie the red-white-yellow sockets you describe), and not HDMI or component, then you should use those.

I'm not familiar with the openbox, but if it's on a satellite box and labeled "loop out" then it likely just passes the satellite signal (for daisychaining a second set top box) rather than outputting a signal that the TV will tune. Even if it also has a UHF out that would let you use an RF cable that would be the worst cabling solution possible in terms of picture quality, and I would advise against using it if there were other options.

You can buy pre-made AV cables in a range of lengths at most places (Dick Smith, Jaycar etc), or easily make your own by buying cable of appropriate length and soldering the plugs if you need a custom length or want to run it inside a wall etc.

Mattv
241 posts

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  #534482 17-Oct-2011 21:23
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As JimmyH says above but if you've got a extra $100 bucks or so you could probably use the the LNB signal out with a RG6 cable to the bedroom and buy a second receiver.  Then you can watch whatever you want and don't have to go to the lounge to change channel.

Jaxson
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  #534542 18-Oct-2011 08:03
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Mattv: you could probably use the the LNB signal out with a RG6 cable to the bedroom and buy a second receiver. 

Agreed that's probably the best way to go for sure.

If you use the loop out of the first satellite box then you need to turn off the lnb power on the second box.  Also the 2nd box will only work if the first box is turned on.  A cheap splitter will mean they can both work independently.

richms
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  #534574 18-Oct-2011 09:36
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If the second tv only has RF and composite in, then its probably a low quality older CRT set, so RF may give acceptable results, so a cheap modulator would be all you need.

That does open up the issue of aspect ratio who, depending on if the sat box can output widescreen to the HDMI and letterboxed to the analog outputs. if not then it will just be frustrating.




Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


injuised
256 posts

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  #534718 18-Oct-2011 14:23
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being DVBS2 it probably hasnt got RF out, so use a HDMI splitter and run an HDMI cable to the second room, personally i would use another STB and change the LNB to a dual or quad output LNB




 

injuised
256 posts

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  #534779 18-Oct-2011 15:47
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Mattv: As JimmyH says above but if you've got a extra $100 bucks or so you could probably use the the LNB signal out with a RG6 cable to the bedroom and buy a second receiver.  Then you can watch whatever you want and don't have to go to the lounge to change channel.



Its DVBS2 




 

Mattv
241 posts

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  #534821 18-Oct-2011 16:30
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injuised:
Mattv: As JimmyH says above but if you've got a extra $100 bucks or so you could probably use the the LNB signal out with a RG6 cable to the bedroom and buy a second receiver.  Then you can watch whatever you want and don't have to go to the lounge to change channel.



Its DVBS2 


Your point being?

As far as I can see there is nothing to stop him using the LNB loop through, or as Jaxson suggests, using a $5 splitter.  As has been mentioned, the OP's second TV doesn't have HDMI inputs and is obviously not HD so will not benefit from an HD signal.  A basic DVB-S receiver for less than $100 would do most people unless there is a need for a specific free to air channel on a DVB-S2 transponder.  

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