Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


2766 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 445


Topic # 88745 22-Aug-2011 23:11
Send private message

Firstly I'm not sure this is exactly the correct forum but I couldn't find a better place to put this.

My question is this.  

After paying to have a website built, would you expect to have to pay for any bugs to be fixed once the site goes live?




Sony Xperia X running Sailfish
Jolla C
Nokia N1
Dell Inspiron 14z i5


Create new topic
299 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 510217 22-Aug-2011 23:39
Send private message

Do the issues affect the functionality of the website or are they more cosmetic?  Also did you raise these issues prior to the site going live/paying for it?

I think most people would expect any legitimate bugs to be fixed.  However I suppose it really depends on if you have a contract or some other sort of agreement that specifically mentions bug fixes and support.






Red Jet Web Services
- Affordable websites for small businesses
- Google Email setup and Migrations

13988 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1763


  Reply # 510228 23-Aug-2011 00:55
Send private message

Technofreak: Firstly I'm not sure this is exactly the correct forum but I couldn't find a better place to put this.

My question is this. ?

After paying to have a website built, would you expect to have to pay for any bugs to be fixed once the site goes live?


All CMS/shopping carts etc have some bugs. But as a client you should have gone through it fully before paying hte final account, to make sure there is nothing that is going to affect the running of it. CMSs often have bug fixes and patches, as well as new features, which you developer would apply for a fee. Some CMS will automatically update themselves, so you don't need the developer to do it for you.

BDFL - Memuneh
60605 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 11541

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 510246 23-Aug-2011 06:58
Send private message

It depends on the contract, but as posted...

Once you have accepted it, then most bugs would go into maintenance. Of course the contract would cover this kind of things, saying that for a specific period of time after acceptance bugs would be squashed ("warranty").







2766 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 445


  Reply # 510470 23-Aug-2011 11:15
Send private message

redjet: Do the issues affect the functionality of the website or are they more cosmetic?  Also did you raise these issues prior to the site going live/paying for it?

I think most people would expect any legitimate bugs to be fixed.  However I suppose it really depends on if you have a contract or some other sort of agreement that specifically mentions bug fixes and support.




The bugs did affect functionality, some of it front end as seen by the public and and some back end as used for admin. These bugs were notified just prior to and just after launch.  For example some issues were to do with browser compatibility, primarily not working properly with I.E. 

The type of website means that it's not possible to test everything prior to launch.  We haven't actually signed off on it so to speak.  The current issue we have is being charged for fixing bugs noticed during the launch phase.

The contract only specifies that bugs will be fixed promptly but also with a clause saying there is no liability for any losses incurred as a result of bugs.  The inference as I read it is the bugs will be fixed for free as because of the fact that there is a clause requiring the bugs to be fixed promptly.  Others may not agree with my interpretation on this.

We haven't paid the final account and we haven't signed off on the site. However when we queried the account we were told that fixing bugs is extra.  




Sony Xperia X running Sailfish
Jolla C
Nokia N1
Dell Inspiron 14z i5


109 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 510499 23-Aug-2011 11:49
Send private message

When I develop a website, I always leave it up to the website's (proud new) owner to decide whether the bugs are worth paying for - if I built the website (and done it wrong), then the bugs are my fault and it's my responsibility to fix them. Although, be careful of the distinction between bugs and features that aren't there that you expected - it's not the programmers fault if he can't read your mind and decide exactly how you want it. But Yes, I believe bugs that occur straight after development should NOT be paid for. Also consider if it's been some time since he done it, consider that he's moved on from your project some time ago and it feels like he's coming back for a second project now with the bug fixes.



2766 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 445


  Reply # 510515 23-Aug-2011 11:59
Send private message

danielm8: Also consider if it's been some time since he done it, consider that he's moved on from your project some time ago and it feels like he's coming back for a second project now with the bug fixes.
 This is certainly not the case here.




Sony Xperia X running Sailfish
Jolla C
Nokia N1
Dell Inspiron 14z i5


299 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 510538 23-Aug-2011 12:31
Send private message

It sounds like a tricky situation but really does come down to the contract.  If there is a clause saying that bugs will be fixed promptly then you should highlight that to them and seriously consider withholding any further payments until they are fixed to your satisfaction.  If the dispute is whether they are bugs or enhancements then that becomes a bit of a grey area unfortunately.

Do you have a list of requirements that they accepted?  If so, are there bugs within these documented requirements?

Also in regards to IE compatibility - is it a particular version of IE that is causing problems?





Red Jet Web Services
- Affordable websites for small businesses
- Google Email setup and Migrations

3395 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 397

Trusted

  Reply # 510613 23-Aug-2011 13:54
Send private message

When I build websites I stipulate very clearly in any contract that it will be built to a certain web standard. Problems with IE displaying etc. aren't actually bugs in the site but rather bugs with IE. Most customers usually say they are happy with following web standards as IE8+ is fairly good which most people are using. Any IE bugs I've got to hack a site to support usually come under a seperate contract/statement of work.





8025 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 387

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 510640 23-Aug-2011 14:29
Send private message

+1 comes down to what's in the contract.  Out of interest would you be willing to blank out confidential and personal info and post the doc?

Anyway...
For next time here's my advice on two clauses you should make sure are in the contract.  It's usually good to have these two things in every contact, they actually protect the client and the developer... so it's good business:

- A 30 day warranty period, ie: the developer will fix all reported and reproducible bugs found within 30 working days after launch
- A clear definition of what constitutes a bug/fault and what constitutes a change in functionality.

ie: You don't pay for bugs found within 30 workings days, you do pay for functionality changes.



13988 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1763


  Reply # 510777 23-Aug-2011 17:04
Send private message

Yes it does depend on the contract. If the contract was just an hourly rate for the amount of time they spent, then I think they can charge for fixing bugs.

Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

N4L helping TAKA Trust bridge the digital divide for Lower Hutt students
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:08


Winners Announced for 2018 CIO Awards
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:03


Logitech Rally sets new standard for USB-connected video conference cameras
Posted 18-Jun-2018 09:27


Russell Stanners steps down as Vodafone NZ CEO
Posted 12-Jun-2018 09:13


Intergen recognised as 2018 Microsoft Country Partner of the Year for New Zealand
Posted 12-Jun-2018 08:00


Finalists Announced For Microsoft NZ Partner Awards
Posted 6-Jun-2018 15:12


Vocus Group and Vodafone announce joint venture to accelerate fibre innovation
Posted 5-Jun-2018 10:52


Kogan.com to launch Kogan Mobile in New Zealand
Posted 4-Jun-2018 14:34


Enable doubles fibre broadband speeds for its most popular wholesale service in Christchurch
Posted 2-Jun-2018 20:07


All or Nothing: New Zealand All Blacks arrives on Amazon Prime Video
Posted 2-Jun-2018 16:21


Innovation Grant, High Tech Awards and new USA office for Kiwi tech company SwipedOn
Posted 1-Jun-2018 20:54


Commerce Commission warns Apple for misleading consumers about their rights
Posted 30-May-2018 13:15


IBM leads Call for Code to use cloud, data, AI, blockchain for natural disaster relief
Posted 25-May-2018 14:12


New FUJIFILM X-T100 aims to do better job than smartphones
Posted 24-May-2018 20:17


Stuff takes 100% ownership of Stuff Fibre
Posted 24-May-2018 19:41



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.