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414 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 191407 3-Feb-2016 14:48
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Hi All,

 

I had a heat pump installed six month ago and it's been nothing but problems really.  In the Winter it couldn't regulate it's temperature (got too hot)  and now in the Summer I've had it on for almost 3 hours set to cool -  18 degrees, and it's 26 degrees in the room.

 

I've spoken to the distributor of the heat pumps who says the "company" that installed my heat pump is no longer accredited with them and is no longer allowed to buy from them due to complaints from other users regarding botched installs.  Given that this is the case, I'd really not prefer that they come back to try and "fix it".  I have lodged a dispute with the Disputes Tribunal because communication has been appalling and I keep getting put off.  But in the meantime, do I really have to allow these jokers back into my house to attempt to fix it?


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  Reply # 1484436 3-Feb-2016 14:50
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 If the distributor of the heat pump had them as accredited installers for their product at the time of the install, does this imply some sort of guarantee by them of the installed product?

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1484458 3-Feb-2016 15:11
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Logically not - if the manufacturer has withdrawn accreditation then I suggest any work the non-accredited company does must by definition be outside any warranty.

 

Write to the manufacturer and confirm that they have told you that Firm A is no longer an accredited firm. Then ask them to tell you how to resolve the issue using an accredited supplier. (You can also produce this in any DT proceedings to show you gave them the chance to make it right).

 

It seems to me that ultimately the maker of the heat pump is responsible for their product working correctly and the problems you mention seem more likely to be electronics in the unit than an install issue.






 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1484478 3-Feb-2016 15:22
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CGA allows you to have someone else rectify the issue and bill those responsible.  Be sure to note down every detail - names, dates and times.  Good luck.




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  Reply # 1484494 3-Feb-2016 15:45
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The company i had install just came round too.  They said it's a very hot day today and I have unrealistic expectations based on how hot it is and where in the room I wanted them to install it.  They also argued that the temperature gadges I was using are incorrect and that it's actually 25 degrees in here - not 27. Even if what they say is true it's still not acceptable when the air con is has been set to 18, right?

 

 Interestingly, I just spoke with the distributor again.  The company I used to install it were not accredited to them as such.  They are wholesale distributors and they normally just make sure the companies that install them have had installation training. They said as a result of other complaints they looked deeper into them and believe they don't hold the necessary skills/qualifications. Turns out the company have been in trouble for doing uncertified electrical work.  They also said that while they can't stop the company purchasing their products as such, they can make it difficult by charging them a signicantly higher price.  The distributor says they offer no protection to end users regarding installation problems - only if there is a problem with the unit itself - and it's now up to me to have another reputable company come in and identify the problem.

 

I've just asked another reputable company to come round and investigate....

 

 


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  Reply # 1484496 3-Feb-2016 15:50
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Geektastic:

 

Logically not - if the manufacturer has withdrawn accreditation then I suggest any work the non-accredited company does must by definition be outside any warranty.

 

 

 

 

I would agree for new work done after the accreditation has been withdrawn, however, work performed whilst the company was accredited should be covered. Having said that, it appears that they weren't accredited so a moot point.

 

 


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  Reply # 1484510 3-Feb-2016 15:50
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If the seller/importer referred you to the installer- that is good enough to say they were 'accredited' at the time because the heat pump can't be used without specialist installation and you would have relied on the seller's referral. Doesn't matter if they are now saying they are no longer accredited because of poor workmanship/complaints. You as 'Joe Public' would not be expected to know if the installer did the job correctly

 

The seller/importer should be responsible under the CGA if the heatpump is faulty because of the installation, unless you got an installer out of the phone book and the seller can prove that the heatpump was installed incorrectly- then you might not have much luck with the CGA or seller.

 

If it is a general fault (ie not because of how it was installed) then the seller is required to remedy under the CGA.

 

If the seller won't play ball, you are able to get someone else to look at it and confirm if it was installation error or another fault. You can claim back those expenses from the seller through small claims/disputes tribunal. I think you have to let the seller know that is what you will do if they won't look at it themselves.


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  Reply # 1484513 3-Feb-2016 15:55
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GeoffisPure:

 

The company i had install just came round too.  They said it's a very hot day today and I have unrealistic expectations based on how hot it is and where in the room I wanted them to install it.  They also argued that the temperature gadges I was using are incorrect and that it's actually 25 degrees in here - not 27. Even if what they say is true it's still not acceptable when the air con is has been set to 18, right?

 

This bit depends a bit - did you go to them and say "I want this specific aircon unit installed in this location" or did you take their recommendation on what unit was required and where it sohuld be installed to provide suitable cooling/heating for the area? 

 

 





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  Reply # 1484517 3-Feb-2016 16:01
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GeoffisPure:

 

The company i had install just came round too.  They said it's a very hot day today and I have unrealistic expectations based on how hot it is and where in the room I wanted them to install it.  They also argued that the temperature gadges I was using are incorrect and that it's actually 25 degrees in here - not 27. Even if what they say is true it's still not acceptable when the air con is has been set to 18, right?

 

what brand heat pump is it?  in the manual you should find a test procedure where you set it to a temperature on cooling say 18degc for a length of time and the air coming out should reach that, then you switch it to heating at say 30degc (or whatever the manual states) and it should also reach that temperature.

 

this is the procedure taken out when our office heatpumps get their yearly check

 

 


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  Reply # 1484528 3-Feb-2016 16:09
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IANAL, but as the retailer is no longer an agent, then you can go to the manufacturer to get it resolved. Basically treat it as though the retailer/installer no longer exists. The distributer/importer is usually considered to be the manufacturer. They can then employ an accredited agent to repair. It is a pretty cut and dry case, that shouldn't need to go to the disputes tribunal.


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  Reply # 1484530 3-Feb-2016 16:10
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What brand of unit is it? Where are you located?

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  Reply # 1484595 3-Feb-2016 17:09
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GeoffisPure:

The company i had install just came round too.  They said it's a very hot day today and I have unrealistic expectations based on how hot it is and where in the room I wanted them to install it.  They also argued that the temperature gadges I was using are incorrect and that it's actually 25 degrees in here - not 27. Even if what they say is true it's still not acceptable when the air con is has been set to 18, right?

Please tell us what model it is and what the m2 and ceiling height of the room is.

 

If it's 27 in there it makes no difference whether the thermostat is set to 18 or 24 , if it can't bring the temperature down it's either underpowered or faulty or wasn't installed correctly.

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  Reply # 1484600 3-Feb-2016 17:12
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mattwnz:

 

IANAL, but as the retailer is no longer an agent, then you can go to the manufacturer to get it resolved. Basically treat it as though the retailer/installer no longer exists. The distributer/importer is usually considered to be the manufacturer. They can then employ an accredited agent to repair. It is a pretty cut and dry case, that shouldn't need to go to the disputes tribunal.

 

 

 

 

That would be OK if there was a product issue. If there was a selection (ie capacity due to incorrect selection) or installation issue that is not up to the manufacturer to resolve. 


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  Reply # 1484605 3-Feb-2016 17:25
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Handle9:

 

mattwnz:

 

IANAL, but as the retailer is no longer an agent, then you can go to the manufacturer to get it resolved. Basically treat it as though the retailer/installer no longer exists. The distributer/importer is usually considered to be the manufacturer. They can then employ an accredited agent to repair. It is a pretty cut and dry case, that shouldn't need to go to the disputes tribunal.

 

 

 

 

That would be OK if there was a product issue. If there was a selection (ie capacity due to incorrect selection) or installation issue that is not up to the manufacturer to resolve. 

 

 

 

 

I think it depends if they were accredited at the time of the install. If so, then the manufacturer should stand behind their accredit installer at the time of the install, otherwise what is the point of having accredited installers. Certainly I think it is something that the manufacturer should be resolving for the customer, which IMO should involved getting another getting accredited installer in to look at it and seeing what needs doing. I mean you buy a brand, you get it installed by the manufacturers installer. What has the consumer done wrong in this case ? Probably a different case though, if they weren't an accredited installer at the time of install.


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  Reply # 1484606 3-Feb-2016 17:31
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GeoffisPure:

 

Hi All,

 

I had a heat pump installed six month ago and it's been nothing but problems really.  In the Winter it couldn't regulate it's temperature (got too hot)  and now in the Summer I've had it on for almost 3 hours set to cool -  18 degrees, and it's 26 degrees in the room.

 

I've spoken to the distributor of the heat pumps who says the "company" that installed my heat pump is no longer accredited with them and is no longer allowed to buy from them due to complaints from other users regarding botched installs.  Given that this is the case, I'd really not prefer that they come back to try and "fix it".  I have lodged a dispute with the Disputes Tribunal because communication has been appalling and I keep getting put off.  But in the meantime, do I really have to allow these jokers back into my house to attempt to fix it?

 

 

Did you set the fan on auto?

 

Does it blow cold air?

 

Anyway, if it is an install problem, I suggest you push the manufacturer to fix it since they supplied the installer at the time of install?


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  Reply # 1484709 3-Feb-2016 18:44
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dolsen:

 

Geektastic:

 

Logically not - if the manufacturer has withdrawn accreditation then I suggest any work the non-accredited company does must by definition be outside any warranty.

 

 

 

 

I would agree for new work done after the accreditation has been withdrawn, however, work performed whilst the company was accredited should be covered. Having said that, it appears that they weren't accredited so a moot point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well, if you look at say a vehicle warranty for example, it will say that work must be done by an accredited dealer. Assuming that is a reasonably transposable requirement, if they were accredited and are no longer, then they cannot work on the equipment within the warranty I would say.






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