Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


711 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 262


Topic # 196055 17-May-2016 18:01
Send private message

Got a dimmer in my lounge that was installed by a sparkie about 18 months ago.

 

It's driving a ceiling fitting that has two pendant 100w bulbs.

 

The 'shades' are just clear glass cylinders, about 120mm diameter, so there's plenty of air circulating through them.

 

It works ok - dims fine, switches on and off etc - but every so often one of the bulbs burns out.

 

I reckon we've gone through 8 or 10 bulbs over the period, but the bulb I put in yesterday only lasted 24 hours.

 

I haven't studied the sequence so can't recall if it's always the same socket.

 

The bulbs are usually supermarket-bought Philips Softone, made in India (?), but I've occasionally used Warehouse bulbs, too.

 

Dunno if it's relevant, but this light does get a fair bit of use. Like 8 - 12 hours daily.

 

Re the dimmer operation, we rarely use it, so the lights are usually on full strength.

 

Anyone able to comment on this?

 

 


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3
Hmm, what to write...
971 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 484

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1554339 17-May-2016 18:42
Send private message

You may be just un/lucky and have relatively high voltage at your place.. close to the transformer/ large changes in the amount of current being drawn from it etc... could be anything really.

 

If you want the bulbs to last longer just dim them before turning them on. The reason they blow at turn on in the large inrush current causing a magnetic field to appear around the spiral wound filament. This filament then "twangs" and the force breaks it (also the filament is more likely to blow like a fuse because of the higher current..).  Once the filament is hot it has a much higher resistance and so less current flows.

 

I'm pretty sure holding your tongue the right way helps as well.





Matthew




711 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 262


  Reply # 1554658 18-May-2016 10:45
Send private message

 Thanks, Mathew. Good tip, didn't know that about dimmers.

 

BTW, just in case anyone was wondering - I only use regular bulbs, not the long-life type. I understand most dimmers won't work properly with those lamps.

 

Re bulb brands, are any superior to others?


13847 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2454

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554684 18-May-2016 10:52
Send private message

Try a dimmable LED bulb. They probably have a little transformer in them so may be less affected.

 

You haven't said if you're using CFL, halogen, etc. "Regular" isn't a bulb type that I recognise.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer




711 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 262


  Reply # 1554704 18-May-2016 11:18
Send private message

timmmay, the bulbs I use in this fitting are always the old-fashioned, bog-standard type that's been around forever. They're not halogen, methane, oxygen or whatever. Not long-life or even medium-life, unfortunately usually short-life.

 

The boxes just say Philips Softone Standard Bulb.

 

I seem to recall trying a dimmable LED type but it didn't last longer than the cheapies.

 

I've also just remembered that I complained to Philips (Auckland) around six months ago about the non-durability of their bulbs. They didn't offer a solution, or any explanation, but at least apologized and sent me four free bulbs.


21023 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4156

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554708 18-May-2016 11:21
One person supports this post
Send private message

Lightbulbs are just crap now. People who are not prepared to spend on efficiant lighting are clearly not going to pay the extra for quality so why bother importing it.

 

Particually those eco halogen ones where they stuff a capsule mains voltage halogen inside something shaped like an old style incandesent lamps. Those along with the GU10 crap downlights tend to take the dimmer out since the gas in them is at a pressure and the filiment so small that they will usually arc over spectacularly when they do go.

 

The longest lasting non-LED lamps I have are actually a couple of retro styled bulbs from ebay that are all styled up to look like a vintage lamp. Had them for years in the outside lights that are on a sensor so off and on all the time, which was killing LEDs in months. CFL was a waste of time outside since its so cold that the warmup is forever, and the ecohalogeny ones were dying within weeks. They use 60 watts and are about as effective as the interior light in a car, but are on for such a short time who cares.





Richard rich.ms



711 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 262


  Reply # 1554713 18-May-2016 11:26
Send private message

So it's not possible to buy a durable 75-100w lamp?


21023 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4156

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554716 18-May-2016 11:32
Send private message

I have not really wanted to get any non led lights for a very long time now. You could try an electrical wholesaler or lighting specilist shop for something a bit better than the 60c junk that seems to be the core incandesent light range at hardware stores etc.





Richard rich.ms

13847 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2454

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554730 18-May-2016 11:46
Send private message

They're probably just called tungsten bulbs, these days they're called "old fashioned, inefficient, legacy tungsten bulbs". Try a modern LED bulb that's compatible with dimmers. Your problem is you're using low quality products.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


26357 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5927

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1554738 18-May-2016 12:00
Send private message

When LED's are now as cheap as chips (I saw $3 the other day) there seriously is no reason to use a normal bulb.

 

 


21023 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4156

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554743 18-May-2016 12:10
Send private message

sbiddle:

 

When LED's are now as cheap as chips (I saw $3 the other day) there seriously is no reason to use a normal bulb.

 

 

If you want to dim, and you want no flicker and reliable ramping up from off, retrofit LEDs are not there yet. And when you talk to people about a dali based automation system with proper drivers on downlights they tend to freak out and say "HOW MANY thousand just for them to work properly?"





Richard rich.ms

1832 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 980


  Reply # 1554744 18-May-2016 12:11
One person supports this post
Send private message

It used to be possible to buy Osram lamps that were rated at 240v rather than 230v. They used to last longer in rural areas with less stable power.




Location: Dunedin

13847 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2454

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554765 18-May-2016 13:07
Send private message

richms:

 

sbiddle:

 

When LED's are now as cheap as chips (I saw $3 the other day) there seriously is no reason to use a normal bulb.

 

 

If you want to dim, and you want no flicker and reliable ramping up from off, retrofit LEDs are not there yet. And when you talk to people about a dali based automation system with proper drivers on downlights they tend to freak out and say "HOW MANY thousand just for them to work properly?"

 

 

I just put in some LED downlights. Flicking can be an issue, but if you get the right dimmer and settings they seem ok. Possibly not at $3 per unit though. Definitely something that needs development and will happen. Even the lowest wattage LEDs I could find were too bright for my office.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


21023 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4156

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554776 18-May-2016 13:19
Send private message

timmmay:

 

I just put in some LED downlights. Flicking can be an issue, but if you get the right dimmer and settings they seem ok. Possibly not at $3 per unit though. Definitely something that needs development and will happen. Even the lowest wattage LEDs I could find were too bright for my office.

 

 

But can you take them from 0% or off up to a tiny nightlight glow without them popcorning on or deciding to turn back off occasionally?





Richard rich.ms

1532 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 342


  Reply # 1554785 18-May-2016 13:22
Send private message

timmmay:

 

They're probably just called tungsten bulbs

 

 

That's right. They are also called incandescent bulbs/lamps/globes but technically that also includes halogen lamps and arc lamps.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb#Tungsten_bulbs


13847 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2454

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1554791 18-May-2016 13:31
Send private message

richms:

 

timmmay:

 

I just put in some LED downlights. Flicking can be an issue, but if you get the right dimmer and settings they seem ok. Possibly not at $3 per unit though. Definitely something that needs development and will happen. Even the lowest wattage LEDs I could find were too bright for my office.

 

 

But can you take them from 0% or off up to a tiny nightlight glow without them popcorning on or deciding to turn back off occasionally?

 

 

I only had the dimmer put in yesterday so not sure. They don't scale to 0%, but they go down to 25% or so I think. On some dial settings they flicker like crazy, though going to max and back down sometimes fixes it.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


 1 | 2 | 3
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

IBM leads Call for Code to use cloud, data, AI, blockchain for natural disaster relief
Posted 25-May-2018 14:12


New FUJIFILM X-T100 aims to do better job than smartphones
Posted 24-May-2018 20:17


Stuff takes 100% ownership of Stuff Fibre
Posted 24-May-2018 19:41


Exhibition to showcase digital artwork from across the globe
Posted 23-May-2018 16:44


Auckland tops list of most vulnerable cities in a zombie apocalypse
Posted 23-May-2018 12:52


ASB first bank in New Zealand to step out with Garmin Pay
Posted 23-May-2018 00:10


Umbrellar becomes Microsoft Cloud Solution Provider
Posted 22-May-2018 15:43


Three New Zealand projects shortlisted in IDC Asia Pacific Smart Cities Awards
Posted 22-May-2018 15:14


UpStarters - the New Zealand tech and innovation story
Posted 21-May-2018 09:55


Lightbox updates platform with new streaming options
Posted 17-May-2018 13:09


Norton Core router launches with high-performance, IoT security in New Zealand
Posted 16-May-2018 02:00


D-Link ANZ launches new 4G LTE Dual SIM M2M VPN Router
Posted 15-May-2018 19:30


New Panasonic LUMIX FT7 ideal for outdoor: waterproof, dustproof
Posted 15-May-2018 19:17


Ryanair Goes All-In on AWS
Posted 15-May-2018 19:14


Te Papa and EQC Minecraft Mod shakes up earthquake education
Posted 15-May-2018 19:12



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.