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5 posts

Wannabe Geek
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# 251356 20-Jun-2019 21:47
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We are moving things around our small 40’s built house, and that means bringing my large desktop PC and my wife's decent sized PC into the same room.  The problem is that the room has very few power sockets on the wall and we will have to “daisy chain”; (ie connect) firstly (1) an extension cord from the socket to (2) x6 socket powerboard then and second (3) shorter extension cord to a final (4) x3 socket powerboard.

 

I will be using x2 power boards with Surge Protection (something like this https://www.bunnings.co.nz/hpm-6-outlet-powerboard-with-surge-protection_p00101825 or will I need something tougher?)

 

The equipment that we will be using on that socket include;

 

 

 

x6 socket powerboard:

 

  • 1xPC (650W PSU)
  • 1x LED monitor
  • 1x inkjet printer
  • X1 desk lamp (40W)
  • (+ the second extension cord plugged in to “daisy-chain” to the second powerboard)

x3 socket powerboard:

 

  • 1xPC (760W PSU)
  • 1x LED monitor
  • 1x free standing floor lamp (40W)

 

 

I'm wondering whether the power draw on a single wall socket will be too much?

 

Is there a way to work out the power draw/capacity of the socket?

 

Look forward to your thoughts and thanks very much in advance.  😄


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190 posts

Master Geek
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  # 2261700 20-Jun-2019 22:02
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Assume PC runs at full wattage (unlikely), lamps 40W, LED 40W and printer 40W (all high side)the total wattage is 1610W which is well below the max of 2300W so all fine.

 

 


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Ultimate Geek
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  # 2261715 21-Jun-2019 00:16
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I wouldn’t worry too much, as regardless of what you add, when it gets too much it will trip the breaker/blow the fuse .

 
 
 
 


791 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2261726 21-Jun-2019 06:08
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RolemasterGM:

 

I'm wondering whether the power draw on a single wall socket will be too much?

 

Is there a way to work out the power draw/capacity of the socket?

 

 

You can use a clamp meter or one of these to see how much power you are using.

 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/arlec-energy-cost-electrical-meter_p04410270

 

Your load doesn't seem particularly high. My rack has 21 power outlets alone, most of which are in use. The same UPS which powers the rack also runs three more PCs in the house, and the only time the USP load limit is exceeded (lower than the socket power limit) is when devices are powered up en masse following an outage.




5 posts

Wannabe Geek
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  # 2261727 21-Jun-2019 06:26
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

RolemasterGM:

 

I'm wondering whether the power draw on a single wall socket will be too much?

 

Is there a way to work out the power draw/capacity of the socket?

 

 

You can use a clamp meter or one of these to see how much power you are using.

 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/arlec-energy-cost-electrical-meter_p04410270

 

Your load doesn't seem particularly high. My rack has 21 power outlets alone, most of which are in use. The same UPS which powers the rack also runs three more PCs in the house, and the only time the USP load limit is exceeded (lower than the socket power limit) is when devices are powered up en masse following an outage.

 

 

Excellent thanks all for your very helpful responses. 

 

I guess my other key issue is if there could be any possible dangerous implications (over heating etc) on "daisy-chaining" - ie linking x2 extension cords and x2 surge protected power boards - to one socket. Presume as no one is mentioning it (rather than simply the total Wattage into the socket as mentioned above) is not likely to be a problem/danger. 

 

Thanks again for all your help & SirHumphreyAppleby LOVE your taste in TV shows. Yes Minister/Prime Minister had one of the best scripts of all time! 

 

 


791 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2261729 21-Jun-2019 06:36
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RolemasterGM:

 

I guess my other key issue is if there could be any possible dangerous implications (over heating etc) on "daisy-chaining" - ie linking x2 extension cords and x2 surge protected power boards - to one socket. Presume as no one is mentioning it (rather than simply the total Wattage into the socket as mentioned above) is not likely to be a problem/danger. 

 

Thanks again for all your help & SirHumphreyAppleby LOVE your taste in TV shows. Yes Minister/Prime Minister had one of the best scripts of all time! 

 

 

It is brilliant. Should be compulsory viewing for all high school students, before they get an opportunity to vote.

 

Poor connections can lead to heat issues. You shouldn't have issues with quality brands like HPM, but I'd stay away from the cheapest of the cheap, particularly at the wall end. I have a few cheap boards. They seem fine, but I wouldn't install those in a location where they were constantly carrying high current.


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Uber Geek
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  # 2261731 21-Jun-2019 06:59
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Just don't go plugging a heater into the plug strips, if you must use a heater plug directly into the wall socket.

Cyril

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  # 2261821 21-Jun-2019 10:22
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Some of the power boards have a overcurrent trip switch .

 

Get QUALITY power board & extension cords , dont use Warehouse/mitre10/bunnings generic cheapies
Are HPM still a quality brand ?

 

Some of the generic's are really bad .

 

A better alternative , is to install a dual(2 socket) wall socket , instead of the single.
Very easy to install yourself , Ive put a few into my 1960's house.

 

Or , try & find a power board with a long lead (eliminating the ext lead). Really hard to find for some reason .


 
 
 
 


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Uber Geek
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  # 2261830 21-Jun-2019 10:31
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Your total wattage is probably fine, and certainly under the rating for the outlet,

 

My only concern would be the daisy chaining, it will mean that one of the power boards will be quite loaded,

 

A better option would be a double adapter (or replace the outlet with a double one) and then run each extension cord and power board as distinct feeds...


769 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2261836 21-Jun-2019 10:57
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Standard 10 amp socket should be good for around 4kw of power drain before tripping the circuit breaker / fuse (I think its 4.4 but could be mistaken).

 

 

If old style house (with ceramic fuses and fuse wire), double check what gauge the fuse wire is, should be 10 or 16 amp, if a MCB, check rating, again likely to be 10 or 16

 

 

Even with commercial / office installations, the run multiple circuits off the one MCB (i.e. a wall of sockets is only likely to feed back to a handful of breakers) as PCs and other normal office equipment doesn't draw much load

474 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2261927 21-Jun-2019 12:31
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wellygary:

Your total wattage is probably fine, and certainly under the rating for the outlet,


My only concern would be the daisy chaining, it will mean that one of the power boards will be quite loaded,


A better option would be a double adapter (or replace the outlet with a double one) and then run each extension cord and power board as distinct feeds...



Please don't use a double adapter, they are a fire waiting to happen. Replacing your single plug with a double outlet is a much safer idea. As mentioned above, multiple sockets are normally run from single breakers with no issue. The difference between that, and double adapters etc, is the connections. In the wall, the sparky will have ensured the connections are tight, and they don't move. Double adapters and the like introduce connections which can come loose, partially connect, arc etc - particularly when the weight of plugs pulls then away from the wall.

I've been to too many house fires as a result of these things, don't use them.




551 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  # 2261931 21-Jun-2019 12:49
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Every power board I have seen in NZ has over current protection. If total connected load draws more than 10A, the built in over current protection should trip, protecting the wall socket from overloading.

I should not that neither double plugs or piggy back plugs / extension cords have any form of over current protection, so it is possible to overload the wall socket this way.

It is important to note that the breaker for that circuit won't protect the socket from overloading, only the wire that feeds potentially multiple sockets. Breaker sizes of 16A and 20A are common, clearly more power than can be safely delivered by a single 10A socket. So it pays to be really carefull if connecting multiple loads to a single socket without over-current protection (i.e. double plug) 


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  # 2261941 21-Jun-2019 13:13
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Scott3:

 

Every power board I have seen in NZ has over current protection. If total connected load draws more than 10A, the built in over current protection should trip, protecting the wall socket from overloading.

I should not that neither double plugs or piggy back plugs / extension cords have any form of over current protection, so it is possible to overload the wall socket this way.

It is important to note that the breaker for that circuit won't protect the socket from overloading, only the wire that feeds potentially multiple sockets. Breaker sizes of 16A and 20A are common, clearly more power than can be safely delivered by a single 10A socket. So it pays to be really carefull if connecting multiple loads to a single socket without over-current protection (i.e. double plug) 

 

 

The overload protection in them is crap, and will often not trip when its getting the plug really hot, or will trip on a sustained 1800 watt load. They are cost engineered pieces of crap that people will opt for the $3 one instead of the $7 one because theyre cheap.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 2261975 21-Jun-2019 14:47
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Brunzy: I wouldn’t worry too much, as regardless of what you add, when it gets too much it will trip the breaker/blow the fuse .

 

sen8or: Standard 10 amp socket should be good for around 4kw of power drain before tripping the circuit breaker / fuse (I think its 4.4 but could be mistaken).

 

There's some very dangerous advice being given in this thread. The breaker on a power circuit is there to protect the cable running to the outlet, not the outlet itself. Commonly, this will be rated at 16 or 20 amp. The outlet itself is only rated to 10 amp. Pulling enough current through a single 10 amp outlet to trip a 20 amp breaker (which incidently, will be more than 20 amps and is time dependant as well) will be massively overloading the outlet and probably result in a melted outlet, if not fire.

 

Basically, you are well into the danger zone for a fire before the breaker trips if all that current is going through a single outlet.


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Uber Geek
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  # 2261991 21-Jun-2019 14:57
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Brunzy: I wouldn’t worry too much, as regardless of what you add, when it gets too much it will trip the breaker/blow the fuse .

I don't think this is correct. The maximum power a 10 amp power point is designed to supply is 2400 watts. The fuse or CB will be able to deliver in excess of 10 amps. Drawing more than 10 amps from a power point isn't a smart idea.




Sony Xperia X running Sailfish OS. https://sailfishos.org The true independent open source mobile OS 
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3181 posts

Uber Geek
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  # 2261994 21-Jun-2019 15:04
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sen8or: Standard 10 amp socket should be good for around 4kw of power drain before tripping the circuit breaker / fuse (I think its 4.4 but could be mistaken).



I think you are mistaken. As far as I know 2400 watts (2.4kw) is the maximum you should draw from a 10 amp socket. See my post above.





Sony Xperia X running Sailfish OS. https://sailfishos.org The true independent open source mobile OS 
Samsung Galaxy Tab S3
Nokia N1
Dell Inspiron 14z i5


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