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scuwp

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#185851 7-Dec-2015 21:42
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I have a basic Samsung series 3 laptop, the original AC adapter for which appears to be failing.  

Original adapter shows output of 19V 3.16A.  I can't see a wattage rating on it but indications are it's 60W.  

Battery itself is marked 11.1V 48Wh (44000mAh) 

Searching on-line keeps throwing up a 19V 4.74A 90W after market variant that is claimed to be a suitable replacement for a 3.16A adapter.    Sounds over-powered to me but they are considerably more common and therefore cheaper.

Is the higher rated adapter OK to use?  

I am tempted just to get a cheap one off trade me.  

Thanks 

 






Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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gzt

gzt
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  #1442380 7-Dec-2015 21:50
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No specific knowledge. I always assume so. Adaptors are usually generic power providers, additional regulation and charging is handled by circuit inside the laptop. There are some exceptions but these tend to have weird dc plugs instead of standard.

Dynamic
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  #1442385 7-Dec-2015 22:00
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Yes absolutely fine. You have the voltage correct. It can supply more power (watts or amps) than you need.




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“Don't believe anything you read on the net. Except this. Well, including this, I suppose.” Douglas Adams

 
 
 
 


toejam316
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  #1442386 7-Dec-2015 22:01
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Yes, it should be fine. Wattage is just Voltage x Amperes, and the Current (Amperes) are drawn by the load (laptop). As long as voltage matches, and Ampage is higher than your devices Ampage, you're safe.




Anything I say is the ramblings of an ill informed, opinionated so-and-so, and not representative of any of my past, present or future employers, and is also probably best disregarded.


scuwp

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  #1442392 7-Dec-2015 22:19
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Thanks all.  Now to Trade Me to find a deal...




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



gzt

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  #1442397 7-Dec-2015 22:39
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You may find the 90 is heavier than the 60. Check the weight to avoid surprises if weight is a factor.

richms
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  #1442430 8-Dec-2015 00:32
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Just dont buy a total piece of crap clone adapter off trademe. Do PB tech not have a real one available?




Richard rich.ms

scuwp

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  #1442454 8-Dec-2015 07:14
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richms: Just dont buy a total piece of crap clone adapter off trademe. Do PB tech not have a real one available?


Yes, for probably more than the laptop is worth. The ones on TM allegedly meet electrical standards (don't they have to before legally sold on NZ?) So not sure why they shouldn't be ok? There are a couple of genuine ones also (supposedly) at 2-3 times the price of others.




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



 
 
 
 


Rikkitic
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  #1442457 8-Dec-2015 07:49
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I don't know but would guess that standards only apply to the high-voltage circuitry. Any diodes and capacitors on the output side could still be cheap rubbish. Even so, I would not hesitate to get one if it saves significant money. Just don't trust it not to catch on fire.
 




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Andib
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  #1442484 8-Dec-2015 08:52
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Do one of these fit? Woudl trust a genuine Samsung over a chinese trademe clone any day

http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?p=search&sf=19V+3.16A


scuwp

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  #1442512 8-Dec-2015 09:50
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Andib: Do one of these fit? Woudl trust a genuine Samsung over a chinese trademe clone any day

http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?p=search&sf=19V+3.16A



Yes, the top one is it.  I hear you re the original quality one vs cheap aftermarket version.  Just trying to justify $70 vs $20 for what for what appears to be exactly the same thing, especially at this time of the year.  

 




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richms
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  #1442585 8-Dec-2015 11:56
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The plastic case will be a very good copy. The certification logos on the sticker will look perfect, but the circuit inside will be crap. All the isolation between you and mains voltage is based on the transformer being built correctly. They are cheaper and work fine when not built with isolation etc. If you load cheap power supplies up to their limits, they get a lot hotter, which stresses the already poor insulation.

Then there are issues with the output being noisy.

The suppliers will give you all the test reports you need to make a compliant SDOC. If the tests actually happened is anyones guess.

At least if you do get a crap one, check your RCD's are working properly. If its only $50 I wouldnt risk it.




Richard rich.ms

trig42
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  #1442596 8-Dec-2015 12:12
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I bought a couple of ebay Dell adaptors for a laptop here at work that takes a smaller pin than the standard Fat Dell one (for which I have a few spares).
They cost about $20-25 NZ each delivered IIRC.

They lasted about 6 weeks.

Got a real one from Dell for ~$70. Been going fine for 6 months now.

toejam316
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  #1442597 8-Dec-2015 12:16
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Rule of thumb - if it plugs into mains, don't skimp out on it. At some point costs were saved. This means at some point that mains voltage isn't being correctly handled. The only win you get with that cheap stuff is not catching fire.




Anything I say is the ramblings of an ill informed, opinionated so-and-so, and not representative of any of my past, present or future employers, and is also probably best disregarded.


scuwp

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  #1442608 8-Dec-2015 12:26
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Ok...I hear y'all. Genuine it is.  Sorry son, that Xbox game you wanted won't be under the tree ;-)

 




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



richms
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  #1446838 10-Dec-2015 00:28
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If you want to see the caliber of goods that china will produce when they dont have someone checking the output, this is a cheap RF modulator that I got so I could push a raspberry pi onto a really old TV for something a friend is doing.

Click to see full size

They have basically put a small noisy switchmode powersupply as found in those $1 phone chargers onto the same circuit board as the RF stuff. There is about 1mm seperating the rectified mains for the power supply from the RF output terminal. The internal wiring for the mains is so thin and badly soldered that simply opening it up had one of the wires break off the switch on the back of it.

It "works" (well it did before I opened it) but I wont be using it as is because its clearly unsafe.

The case looks really nicely made.




Richard rich.ms

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