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mdf



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Topic # 162206 2-Feb-2015 10:00
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So, another "is this install okay" question. Sorry.  

Mum's place is on a back section down a long driveway. The existing copper is under a asphalted driveway and seems to have broken somewhere buried. Mum has relatively recently asphalted the driveway and wasn't keen to have it with an ugly different colour patch. Needless to say, Chorus/Downer wasn't keen to repave the whole thing (and I didn't expect them to).  

After a *lot* of to-ing and fro-ing via her ISP (Vodafone - who actually provided some pretty good customer service overall in this one), Chorus/Downer eventually agreed to run a new cable down the fenceline. From following similar threads about UFB installs, this almost seems to be Chorus' preferred install option so I don't know why it was a problem. It seemed like a no-brainer to me, but it took a while to get there. Making things even more complicated was that fibre is due in a couple of months, so I think there was an all-around lack of enthusiasm for replacing the copper.  

The conduit seems okay (ish - see further below) up until it reaches a carport, where it runs up at a 45 degree angle for a bit, before the cable only (no conduit) runs up and over the carport, down another wall before going into the house.







Queries:  

- The angled conduit upwards isn't weather sealed. There also isn't any kind of drainage hole along the conduit. While the hole itself is reasonably sheltered by the capping, I would have thought the cable is going to wick the water straight down into a puddle at the bottom of the conduit. Is this okay?  

- Is bare cable actually okay going up, over and down the carport without any covering? Is it going to degrade in the light? Is it okay (and should it) be painted?  

I'm actually pretty underwhelmed by the standard of the installation overall. First, the conduit isn't even straight along the fence - it takes a pretty big dip down at the end. While most of the screws are stainless, they have also used some yellow zinc wood screws (i.e. intended for interior use only, they will rust outside). The clips used to attach the conduit to the fence are galvanised, but they've cut half the clip off to make it fit under the capping - again, it's going to rust where it's cut, but it also makes the hold against the fence pretty poor. Finally, they've installed a new plastic box (demarcation point?), but haven't bothered to level it properly, so its on a noticeable angle.  

I'll end fixing most of these relatively easily (maybe not the plastic box - triwing security screws), but I don't think I should really have to. I'd be fine letting the little stuff slide, if the installation itself had been done properly without all the fuss. Right now, it just leaves a sour taste in the mouth.  

As I say, fibre is due in a couple of months, so I'm not going to die in a ditch over this stuff, but it would be good to know what is acceptable and what is not and making sure it is all fixed when the fibre goes in.

EDIT: re-doing paragraph breaks

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  Reply # 1227487 2-Feb-2015 10:41
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that open conduit needs to be sorted.

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  Reply # 1227512 2-Feb-2015 11:23
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The cable sheathing is a polycoating and is not effected by being exposed to the elements - the conduiting is only there to give it some physical protection and doesnt need to be sealed up against the elements

 

 


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  Reply # 1227543 2-Feb-2015 11:31
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InstallerUFB: The cable sheathing is a polycoating and is not effected by being exposed to the elements - the conduiting is only there to give it some physical protection and doesnt need to be sealed up against the elements


Why use flexi on a straight run? Are the techs trained on what product should be used where?

Is that a proper ETP? It looks too small to get a good size loop going on. 


mdf



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  Reply # 1227557 2-Feb-2015 11:41
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lxsw20:
InstallerUFB: The cable sheathing is a polycoating and is not effected by being exposed to the elements - the conduiting is only there to give it some physical protection and doesnt need to be sealed up against the elements


Why use flexi on a straight run? Are the techs trained on what product should be used where?

Is that a proper ETP? It looks too small to get a good size loop going on. 



Sorry, the photography doesn't help. The flexi is inside a solid conduit for the straight run, it's just at the end where the fenceline takes a diagonal turn upwards that they've left the flexi exposed.



Thanks for the other info.

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  Reply # 1227614 2-Feb-2015 12:27
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lxsw20: Is that a proper ETP? It looks too small to get a good size loop going on. 


It's a copper install.

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  Reply # 1227616 2-Feb-2015 12:29
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Someone should design a high sided timber fence capping that can be installed to allow a conduit run (or even bare wiring)under it.  So would be installed via nailing into the side of it as opposed to down into the top of the fence.

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  Reply # 1227618 2-Feb-2015 12:29
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All  looks quite normal for a copper install.

Remember the same cable is what is used above and below ground so can withstand the weather

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  Reply # 1231870 5-Feb-2015 19:46
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I wonder who will pay the bill when the fence falls over and pulls it out of the terminators?

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  Reply # 1232446 6-Feb-2015 23:24
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I've done some crafty as **** installs on all sorts and If apperance matters that much you could have lifted the red brick along the drive way, and gone UP the downpipe and out the TOP at the gutter.  You could have moved the Demarc point as it's just poked under the floor anyway.  You'd have to get on the good side of the installer.

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  Reply # 1232484 7-Feb-2015 10:02

The "solid conduit" running along under the fence capping shown in the last photo seems to be sagging already.
Looks like the clamps are installed too far apart and over time the conduit will sag even more.  Will look even uglier than it does now.
I would suggest fitting more clamps and seeing if the conduit can be painted to make it less obvious.

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Reply # 1232486 7-Feb-2015 10:28
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^^^

Hey at least they coughed up for some conduit in this instance.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


mdf



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  Reply # 1233131 8-Feb-2015 21:02
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snaffta: I've done some crafty as **** installs on all sorts and If apperance matters that much you could have lifted the red brick along the drive way, and gone UP the downpipe and out the TOP at the gutter.  You could have moved the Demarc point as it's just poked under the floor anyway.  You'd have to get on the good side of the installer.


The red bricks are concreted in and the installer wouldn't put cable in stormwater pipes. I did try :(

It's less the appearance of it all, and more whether it will last. From the sounds of things it is okay.

 

k1w1k1d: The "solid conduit" running along under the fence capping shown in the last photo seems to be sagging already.
Looks like the clamps are installed too far apart and over time the conduit will sag even more.  Will look even uglier than it does now.
I would suggest fitting more clamps and seeing if the conduit can be painted to make it less obvious.


Yep, doesn't help that because the clamps are cut, there's only one screw (and the bottom one at that) holding it on.

I will put some more clamps (and stainless screws in) and paint it up. I just didn't want to go through all that and then find out it needed to be replaced anyway.

The current solution to stop the conduit filling up with water is a blob of blue tack. I didn't want to silicon it until the fibre is (eventually) inserted.

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  Reply # 1233153 8-Feb-2015 21:29
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They coulda used half saddle clamps that look like these. I'm not sure if they're available in stainless steel.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


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  Reply # 1233198 8-Feb-2015 23:03
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Not seen them in stainless myself. Would be handy to have if they were available though.




Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

 

 

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