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110 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 95336 31-Dec-2011 08:20
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After much research I have just purchased a Nikon D5100 Body with an 18mm to 105mm AF-S VR zoom lens.It was a three way decision.Could have bought a Pentax Kr body and used existing lens off my old 35mm film reflex camera.Decided no. Looked at new Sony Nex7 with a 18 to 200mm zoom.To expensive at Approx $2700.Got Nikon for $1500 at specialist dealer in Christchurch and I thought that was a good deal.

However I want to do some close up work but don't want to go overboard on the price of a macro lens. Saw an old Nikon MF 55mm 3.5 Micro at $89.00 dollars.I believe it will fit ok but would most probally be full manual in operation.Has anyone used old lens on DSLR cameras and if so what are the pitfalls or do they work ok? I see nikon have a 40mm and 60mm micro lens at approx 455 and 780 dollars respectively but don't want to spend that much if possible.

The other way is to buy a say, number one or two close up lens and screw it onto the front of the zoom.Has anyone got good results doing it that way.The photos will be taken in controlled conditions inside using a tripod with no time factor involved so can take as long as nessasary to set up.

Just for interest,first impressions of the camera are all good.Nice to handle and fast to use.Took a couple of video clipsas well and very pleased with the results.
Thankyou

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  Reply # 563138 31-Dec-2011 09:00
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Others with more detailed technical knowledge will hopefully be able to clarify, but depending on the exact age and design of the lens you'll probably find that it will work albeit without any auto-focus and/or auto exposure metering functionality. 

Personally I wouldn't bother with the old lens. The new 40mm AF-S micro is a fully functional entry level micro lens and is very affordable in my view so long term I think you're much better to bite the bullet and fork out the extra for that.

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  Reply # 569819 17-Jan-2012 11:05
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The 5100 doesn't have an AF motor in its body so you will always need to buy lenses that have AF-S designation as that means they have the auto-focus motor built in.

If you did/have ended up buying a MF lens it'll work fine, just in manual focus mode only.

I've used the macro lens attachments before and been less than impressed. They introduce significant blurring and aberrations to the image. I always considered macro images as one of the most demanding of image quality so gave up using them.

I would invest in some extension tubes (or extension bellows) and a cheap MF lens. You can get extension tubes that don't have electronic connections and are very reasonable if you're only working in a studio and have the time to compose a shot.

 
 
 
 




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Master Geek
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Reply # 570205 17-Jan-2012 23:04
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Thankyou alasta and Disrespective for you replies.
I have mucked around with a manual only extention tube and it works but not that well as the lens only works at its smallest aperture and the subject size is nearly non adjustable.It will do for some work but far from ideal.
When my "toy account" ie Mastercard Hot Points builds up again in a month or two iv'e decided to do it properly and get a new macro lens,most probally the Nikon 40mm.Then I will have complete control of focus and aperture and make life a lot easier.
Kind regards 



110 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 3


Reply # 582125 15-Feb-2012 23:56
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Went out and bought the Nikon Micro 40mm f 2.8 lens this week. Am highly delighted with it. I have set it up on the bottom of the centre column of my tripod to act as a copy stand and have been copying old family black and white photos,some of which are only about 50mm wide and some are up to 10x8 inches.
The results on my computer screen seen to be more than aceptable.I am not advanced enough yet to do much production work on the files,but the results out of the camera seem good.

I have used two 10watt halogen lamps as a copy light sorce and that seems ok for the B & W photos but I have some colour photos with no negs that I would like to copy also and was wondering about the colour temperature needed for colour? I have a work bench area underneath a window and I'm wondering if the daylight,providing that I don't get glare or shadows would be ok?

Any comments please would be very helpfull

Regards 

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  Reply # 582245 16-Feb-2012 10:42
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Indirect daylight will give you better color than work lamps. Since you're using a tripod and the subject is still it doesn't matter if you need a 1 second or more exposure.




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  Reply # 583318 18-Feb-2012 22:20
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If you shoot in RAW you can adjust the color temperature if it comes out wrong as part of your processing

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