Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




571 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


Topic # 101533 3-May-2012 14:57
Send private message

I have a path hugging the front of the house, and I'm trying to decide on the best way to light it. The path is concrete, sloped and includes two minor flights of stairs (as indicated in red below).




- As an experiment, I tried putting a spot where the last light was positioned (as indicated by 'A'), but the angle was blinding to anyone coming up the path, and both the stairs were cast into darkness.
- I've considered low wall mounted lights, but wiring would be impossible and I don't want to make holes in the brickwork.
- I've considered low voltage bollards and underground wiring on the far side of the path, but that would be very expensive, and there is no convenient exit point to run wires out of the house.

Now I'm thinking the best (and cleanest looking) approach would be recessed cans in the eaves. The eaves are large, and I can run all the wiring through the ceiling cavity. What are my chances of getting away with just three recessed fittings ('B')? It needs to be something that wont set fire to the wooden soffit.



View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
13110 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1535


  Reply # 618906 3-May-2012 15:02
Send private message

Oubadah: I have a path hugging the front of the house, and I'm trying to decide on the best way to light it. The path is concrete, sloped and includes two minor flights of stairs (as indicated in red below).




- As an experiment, I tried putting a spot where the last light was positioned (as indicated by 'A'), but the angle was blinding to anyone coming up the path, and both the stairs were cast into darkness.
- I've considered low wall mounted lights, but wiring would be impossible and I don't want to make holes in the brickwork.
- I've considered low voltage bollards and underground wiring on the far side of the path, but that would be very expensive, and there is no convenient exit point to run wires out of the house.

Now I'm thinking the best (and cleanest looking) approach would be recessed cans in the eaves. The eaves are large, and I can run all the wiring through the ceiling cavity. What are my chances of getting away with just three recessed fittings ('B')? It needs to be something that wont set fire to the wooden soffit.




What about path lighting in the ground, or even uplighters, washing up across the walls of the house or plants. They can produce a more subtle light, for lighting the path.

13092 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2158

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 618907 3-May-2012 15:08
Send private message

I can't see the diagram, domain blocking at work. How about solar lights though?

Can you bury low voltage wiring yourself?




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


 
 
 
 


6449 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 493

Trusted

  Reply # 618910 3-May-2012 15:20
Send private message

Option B look good. Depending on how far out your eaves hang it could work quite well. Though technically you'd shadow the steps as you went to walk onto them. Looks good though.



571 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 618967 3-May-2012 17:04
Send private message

timmmay: How about solar lights though?


I haven't see a solar powered solution that would provide the kind of output I'm after, plus I would like to have these lights controlled by a timer/sensor system that controls my entrance lights.

timmmay: Can you bury low voltage wiring yourself?


The problem with underground wiring to bollards is that one side of the path is flush against the wall of the house, and a shallow field drain (plastic perforated tube in a gravel bed) running along the other side. And as I said above, there is no convenient point at which I could run a power supply line out of the house it'self.

Jaxson: Option B look good. Depending on how far out your eaves hang it could work quite well. Though technically you'd shadow the steps as you went to walk onto them. Looks good though.


I'm not sure what kind of recessed lighting I could use though, some kind of CFL based can? Halogens/standard incandescents would be too hot for my liking...



805 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  Reply # 619034 3-May-2012 19:53
Send private message

Have you considered using radium?

"Radium was formerly used in self-luminous paints for watches, nuclear panels, aircraft switches, clocks, and instrument dials"

3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 619163 4-May-2012 05:58
Send private message

Option B with recessed down lights. If I remember I'll take a photo of mine this weekend. Don't worry too much about the steps if the end light is really close to them (as in the picture).

Not supposed to use CFL or LED outside, they have electronic circuits in them which is not outdoor rated (moisture), and also not sealed enclosure rated (gets too hot). But nothing stops you from using them outdoors.

EDIT:  I mean not supposed to used na indoors CFL or LED bulb in an outdoors fitting, obviously you can if the specific bulb/fitting combination is sold as outdoor rated.




You can never have enough Volvos!


2696 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1143


  Reply # 619198 4-May-2012 07:58
Send private message

Forget solar...have yet to see any system that puts out anything significant.

We have the recessed down-lights ("cans") around the outside of our house and find them quite effective. They don't cast too far out but will light up around 3 meters out from the house effectively, and we are using good quality low consumption bulbs. You could turn your larger floodlight out to pick up where the down-lights beam stops to light up the whole area. Ease of installation is a bonus.







Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



1307 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 536


  Reply # 619223 4-May-2012 08:27
Send private message

Jaxson: Option B look good. Depending on how far out your eaves hang it could work quite well. Though technically you'd shadow the steps as you went to walk onto them. Looks good though.

You should get enough splash off the side of the house to make this not such an issue.



571 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 619491 4-May-2012 13:39
Send private message

Niel: Option B with recessed down lights. If I remember I'll take a photo of mine this weekend. Don't worry too much about the steps if the end light is really close to them (as in the picture).

Not supposed to use CFL or LED outside, they have electronic circuits in them which is not outdoor rated (moisture), and also not sealed enclosure rated (gets too hot). But nothing stops you from using them outdoors.

EDIT:  I mean not supposed to used na indoors CFL or LED bulb in an outdoors fitting, obviously you can if the specific bulb/fitting combination is sold as outdoor rated.


There's this kind of thing: http://www.electricaldirectltd.co.nz/ecommerce.php?func=14&DCI=62&DPT=p&DPI=1077&S=d2937f5d6b8b961b8439aa21f3cbc000

3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 619617 4-May-2012 15:39
Send private message

Oubadah:
Niel: Option B with recessed down lights. If I remember I'll take a photo of mine this weekend. Don't worry too much about the steps if the end light is really close to them (as in the picture).

Not supposed to use CFL or LED outside, they have electronic circuits in them which is not outdoor rated (moisture), and also not sealed enclosure rated (gets too hot). But nothing stops you from using them outdoors.

EDIT:  I mean not supposed to used na indoors CFL or LED bulb in an outdoors fitting, obviously you can if the specific bulb/fitting combination is sold as outdoor rated.


There's this kind of thing: http://www.electricaldirectltd.co.nz/ecommerce.php?func=14&DCI=62&DPT=p&DPI=1077&S=d2937f5d6b8b961b8439aa21f3cbc000


Yes, that is an outdoor bulb which is partly what I covered in the edit.  Normal glass bulbs can be used outdoors but you see many people incorrectly using indoors rated CFL for outdoors fittings.

Regarding solar, the number on issue is that a solar lamp needs to be positioned where the sun can charge the batteries and this is where you also get most moonlight (and streetlight).  That is not where you need the light.  Second is they are for decoration, not for illumination.  Both can be addressed by a remote panel which you can increase in size to drive larger/more lamps, but then you can just as well go with a low voltage hard wired installation which is cheaper and does not require battery replacement.




You can never have enough Volvos!




571 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 619644 4-May-2012 16:13
Send private message

Niel: Yes, that is an outdoor bulb which is partly what I covered in the edit.  Normal glass bulbs can be used outdoors but you see many people incorrectly using indoors rated CFL for outdoors fittings.


I tried two Philips tornado CFL in lanterns on the front porch. One only lasted about a month, but the porch area was very dry and lantern never got hot so I think it was our dirty power that killed it.

That said there has been a very old Philips indoor CFL ('four sticks') in the back outdoor stair well (similar conditions to the porch) and it has been in operation for an eternity. I noticed that it's made in Holland whereas the new one is Chinese, so that's probably the difference there. I wonder how much more durable modern CFLs would be if you rebuilt the ballasts with quality components.






20183 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3782

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 619723 4-May-2012 18:23
Send private message

We have 2 of those old philips in the loos at work that have done 11 hours a day for at least 10 years. Take forever to warm up now tho.

If you are putting recessed into the eave get the IP ones so that you dont leak air in




Richard rich.ms



571 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 619755 4-May-2012 19:12
Send private message

richms: We have 2 of those old philips in the loos at work that have done 11 hours a day for at least 10 years. Take forever to warm up now tho.


When it dies, I'm going to be very interested in comparing it's innards to the modern one.

richms:If you are putting recessed into the eave get the IP ones so that you dont leak air in


Did a quick google, but I'm still not 100% on what you mean by 'IP'. And leak air into where? The loft? It's a tile roof, so the whole thing is basically one big leak. :)

3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 619779 4-May-2012 19:42
Send private message

IP = ingress protection (see Wikipedia for full explanation). The down side of an IP rated fitting is that you will not get airflow to cool your lamp as it will be closed off. And you are not supposed to use indoor rated CFL or LED with an enclosed light fitting as the components can overheat and die prematurely.




You can never have enough Volvos!


20183 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3782

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 619781 4-May-2012 19:44
Send private message

Ip rating for water ingress etc.




Richard rich.ms

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Symantec protects data everywhere with Information Centric Security
Posted 21-Sep-2017 15:33


FUJIFILM introduces X-E3 mirrorless camera with wireless connectivity
Posted 18-Sep-2017 13:53


Vodafone announces new plans with bigger data bundles
Posted 15-Sep-2017 10:51


Skinny launches phone with support for te reo Maori
Posted 14-Sep-2017 08:39


If Vodafone dropping mail worries you, you’re doing online wrong
Posted 11-Sep-2017 13:54


Vodafone New Zealand deploy live 400 gigabit system
Posted 11-Sep-2017 11:07


OPPO camera phones now available at PB Tech
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:56


Norton Wi-Fi Privacy — Easy, flawed VPN
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:48


Lenovo reveals new ThinkPad A Series
Posted 8-Sep-2017 14:37


Huawei passes Apple for the first time to capture the second spot globally
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:45


Vodafone initiative enhances te reo Maori pronunciation on Google Maps
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:40


Voyager Internet expand local internet phone services company with Conversant acquisition
Posted 6-Sep-2017 18:27


NOW Expands in to Tauranga
Posted 5-Sep-2017 18:16


Windows 10 Fall Creators Update coming Oct. 17
Posted 4-Sep-2017 14:10


Garmin introduce Garmin vivoactive 3
Posted 1-Sep-2017 18:38



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.