Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




56 posts

Master Geek
Inactive user


#195242 12-Apr-2016 09:16
Send private message

I recently foolishly bought a car sight-unseen from an Auckland dealer (I'm in Tauranga, had a friend pick it up and drive it to me, I did NOT instruct him to inspect the car as he was doing me a favour). Anyway, among the other issues that the lying prick of a dealer didn't disclose, three of the tires are right on the wear bars. The front right tires obviously didn't pass the WOF, so was replaced with a new one. So I have three heavily worn tires and one new tire. I've always understood that it's a safety hazard to have mismatching tires like this, particularly on the same axle.

 

 

 

Should the dealer not have replaced both front tires, at the very least? I mean, really he should have replaced them all because the car really isn't fit for purpose with barely-WOF-able tires, but that's another point.


Create new topic
8414 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1530467 12-Apr-2016 09:27
Send private message

I suspect by my experience last moth that miss matched tire won't get you a WOF.  Last year i bought a 2008  Ford Mondeo  with 34000Km on the clock . I noticed after a week or two that there was a bit of a shimmy on the front wheels so took it back for a wheel balance.  They said that the right front had been curbed by the previous owner so they put it on the back. Still a slight noise but no worry.  Last moth it went in for a service and I asked them to put the spare on the left rear.  No can do they said as the tread pattern was different from the ones  on the vehicle.  All 4 tires and the spare are original.  The only way to put the spare on as a permanent tire is to change  it so that the tread is the same as the rest of the vehicle.   One reason never to buy a European vehicle that  comes into the country without a spare  tire and local ford NZ just put any old tire on as a spare  and put a sticker on it  saying it can't go faster than 80KPH..  The  spare is exactly the same size and the other four tires and not a space saver..





Regards,

Old3eyes


16213 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1530476 12-Apr-2016 09:38
Send private message

Isn't there a requirement for a dealer to have a recent WOF? Is there some kind of small claims or decision making body for cars? If the dealer doesn't immediately put things right don't mess around, go straight to whatever authority applies.


 
 
 
 


152 posts

Master Geek


  #1530483 12-Apr-2016 09:41
Send private message

If the patterns on the tyres don't match, it definitely a WOF fail. But if they're the same pattern and have different treads, it's not really a reason to fail a WOF as long as the treads are within legal requirements.

 

A section from AA:

 

Match your tyres

 

Driving with mismatched tyres is dangerous. Among other warrant of fitness requirements, tyres on the same axle must be of the same tread pattern. However, there is no legal requirement for tyres on all axles to be the same tread, even though NZTA agrees that fitting four identical tyres (preferably summer) provides the best grip.

 

Snow tyres are made with a softer rubber compound and deeper treads, designed to maintain grip in ice and snow. They can be distinguished by their deep square-patterned tread blocks with numerous fine blades. Newer snow tyres are also marked with a 'mountain snowflake' symbol on the sidewall. They might be found on used cars imported from colder parts of Japan. In Japan, such tyres must have at least 50% tread depth to be legal, yet many below this will still comply with NZ's minimum tread depth of 1.5mm and thus can be used here.

 

NZTA says the majority of Kiwi motorists have no need to use snow tyres - those who do drive in ice or snow should have them fitted to all four wheels and change them at the end of winter.

 

However, snow tyres must not be confused with all-season 'mud and snow' tyres (often marked with the letters 'M+S' on the sidewall), which are designed to perform safely in a wide range of summer and winter conditions and are commonly fitted to 4WD vehicles.

 

Check the tread pattern on all four wheels, and if any appear to be specialist snow tyres, arrange for these to be replaced with ordinary summer tyres. Have your car inspected immediately if you've ever experienced any loss of control, particularly if it's a Japanese import.

 

If the dealer sold the car to you under the pretence the vehicle was road-worthy, then you can take it up with them legally.


6434 posts

Uber Geek


  #1530514 12-Apr-2016 09:52
Send private message

christherider:

 

I recently foolishly bought a car sight-unseen from an Auckland dealer (I'm in Tauranga, had a friend pick it up and drive it to me, I did NOT instruct him to inspect the car as he was doing me a favour).

 

 

 

 

I'm curious.  why did you do that.

 

 

 

was it  a particularly rare model that couldn't be acquired locally?

 

 

 

or just such a "good deal" on the price that you decided to take the risk?


3371 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1530519 12-Apr-2016 10:08
Send private message

venomio:

If the patterns on the tyres don't match, it definitely a WOF fail. But if they're the same pattern and have different treads, it's not really a reason to fail a WOF as long as the treads are within legal requirements.



I take it that you mean pattern type.

From WOF inspection manual
Tyres on the same axle are not of the same:

a) size designation (see Table 10-1-3), or

b) carcass type (ie mixed steel ply, fabric radial ply, bias/cross ply, run-flat), or

c) tread pattern type (mixed asymmetric, directional, normal highway, traction , winter tyre tread.

593 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #1530696 12-Apr-2016 12:39
Send private message

Would not be surprise if they got the WOF and then put some old tyres on it since you hadn't seen it.

Mad Scientist
22603 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1530719 12-Apr-2016 12:59
Send private message

Bung:
venomio:

If the patterns on the tyres don't match, it definitely a WOF fail. But if they're the same pattern and have different treads, it's not really a reason to fail a WOF as long as the treads are within legal requirements.



I take it that you mean pattern type.

From WOF inspection manual
Tyres on the same axle are not of the same:

a) size designation (see Table 10-1-3), or

b) carcass type (ie mixed steel ply, fabric radial ply, bias/cross ply, run-flat), or

c) tread pattern type (mixed asymmetric, directional, normal highway, traction , winter tyre tread.


Ah that makes much more sense




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


Create new topic




News »

Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51


QNAP integrates Catalyst Cloud Object Storage into Hybrid Backup solution
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:40



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.