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Topic # 123248 30-Jun-2013 17:49
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I bought some rib eye/scotch fillet steaks and made the missus upset ... apparently no good ... seriously???

So of all the steak cuts can anyone rank them from most to least tender?

Fillet (without the rib word) is the best? American google says tenderloin is the best?

Rump steak is the toughest?

And what's in between?

Thanks

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  Reply # 847460 30-Jun-2013 17:55
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Winner for most random off topic threads lol

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  Reply # 847461 30-Jun-2013 17:56
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That's a pretty hard thing to rank as the tenderness of steak will vary depending on a huge number of factors.

Rump steak for example won't always be tough, it depends how where in the rump the cut is from. I personally find a good cut from the middle can make a truely fantastic steak.

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  Reply # 847462 30-Jun-2013 17:57

Scotch fillet and sirloin are by far the tastiest cuts. Eye fillet is certainly the most tender, but it's an extremely lean cut that doesn't really have the depth of flavour that a nicely marbled scotch or sirloin has.

You've done nothing wrong, your missus needs an education...



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  Reply # 847470 30-Jun-2013 18:22
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johnr: Winner for most random off topic threads lol


thanks



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  Reply # 847471 30-Jun-2013 18:23
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KevinL: Scotch fillet and sirloin are by far the tastiest cuts. Eye fillet is certainly the most tender, but it's an extremely lean cut that doesn't really have the depth of flavour that a nicely marbled scotch or sirloin has.

You've done nothing wrong, your missus needs an education...


ok ... I can't tell her what you said though ... it won't end well

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  Reply # 847472 30-Jun-2013 18:28
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joker97:
KevinL: Scotch fillet and sirloin are by far the tastiest cuts. Eye fillet is certainly the most tender, but it's an extremely lean cut that doesn't really have the depth of flavour that a nicely marbled scotch or sirloin has.

You've done nothing wrong, your missus needs an education...


ok ... I can't tell her what you said though ... it won't end well


These things never do Laughing

Re your first post, cross cut blade is the toughest and is riddled with gristle. KevinL is bang with his post. Tenderness is one thing but you need fat to get the really tasty flavours we've been programmed to desire from our earliest beginnings.

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  Reply # 847483 30-Jun-2013 19:41
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wagyu - almost any cut.

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  Reply # 847489 30-Jun-2013 20:07
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From steakhousefinder.com

Based on tenderness, beef steaks rank as follows:
Tenderloin Steak
Shoulder, Top Blade Steak (Flat Iron)
Ribeye Cap
Shoulder Tender (Petite Tender)
Loin, Strip Loin Steak (NY Strip Steak, Kansas City Steak)
T-Bone and Porterhouse Steaks
Rib Steak
Ribeye Steak
Shoulder, Arm Steak (Ranch Steak)
Flank Steak
Round, Knuckle (Tip) Steak (Sirloin Tip Steak, Sirloin Steak)
Round, Top (Inside) Round Steak (Top Round Steak, London Broil)
Top Sirloin Rump Steak (Top Rump Steak, Top Sirloin Steak)

YMMV.
Cheers,
Joseph

Edit. On second reading perhaps this is not much help as many of the names of cuts are dissimilar to what we use. Hopefully still helpful anyway.



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  Reply # 847492 30-Jun-2013 20:17
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hmm the missus pointed out that in New World it is called "Beef Fillet Steak" ... I wonder which cut it is ... it looks like a "eye fillet" or "tenderloin" - I believe they are interchangeable?



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  Reply # 847494 30-Jun-2013 20:17
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oh well ..

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  Reply # 847502 30-Jun-2013 20:49
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It's not the cut it's the cooking and resting




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  Reply # 847781 1-Jul-2013 16:45
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Note there is no definitive changeover from one type of cut to the next, there is a transition. This is where the cheaper steak comes from, but if you know what to look for (I don't, saw it on TV) then you can buy a cheaper steak that has some characteristics of more expensive steaks. The restaurants get the best cuts.

In general, meat gets tough if you salt it beforehand. (Especially lamb.)

My wife sometimes make steak in the oven with a scoop of mayonnaise and a helping of cheese. The enzymes makes it tender and the cheese keeps it moist. And I love it despite not liking mayonnaise.




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  Reply # 847790 1-Jul-2013 16:56
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  Reply # 847814 1-Jul-2013 17:37
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KiwiNZ: It's not the cut it's the cooking and resting


True and for that reason (although OT strictly speaking) it's hard to beat a beef stew made with very long- and slow-cooked gravy beef, especially with some kidney in there. Made this over the weekend - great, even if I say so myself. Cheap too - but that wasn't the object.

Haven't made it but I believe the same applies to ox tail. Like lamb shanks (very OT now).

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  Reply # 847831 1-Jul-2013 17:58
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I cannot stress enough the importance of resting your meat after cooking it. I wish it was taught at school. They often don't rest them enough in NZ Steakhouses either which is shocking.

My roast chicken recipe calls for 45 minutes cooking and 45 minutes resting and I've never had a singe bad thing said about it, and PLENTY of incredible praise.



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