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Topic # 64936 26-Jul-2010 12:13
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Hi all,

I'm going to have a crack at a couple of DIY energy saving tests around the home.

1st is a cap on my shower to check if one of those shower dome covers would be of any benefit in our situation.  I have a roughly 1m by 1m shower I'd say, with a curved front.  I believe the actual shower domes are 4m acrylic sheeting.

2nd is a poor mans double glazing, in which I'm going to try and create another layer of plastic, either thick gladwrap styles or more substantial acrylic panels perhaps.  I will attach these to my aluminium windows to create an air barrier and do some tests to see if it improves matters.  The layer will be attached either via double sided tape or stick on magnetic tape styles, haven't decided yet.  I'll do a few windows first before I go crazy with it.  Hope to reduce heat losses and hope to see a reduction in condensation.  Also on bedroom windows where I don't mind blurring the view, but still want to be clear to let light in.

Any ideas on where to pick up cheap clear plastic sheets/panels?

Cheers all.

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  Reply # 356444 26-Jul-2010 12:32
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can get 250micron from plastic box.

the 1st one wont so much as save power but decrease the moisture content in your bathroom. Was a great test i'll be looking at changing my plastic sheet to a shower dome shortly.




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  Reply # 356454 26-Jul-2010 12:47
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Thanks man, much appreciated.

Yeah anything that reduces moisture buildup in the home helps with health benefits, as well as reducing the energy needed for extract fans, dehumidifyers etc, and also it's easier to heat dryer/less humid air as well.

Good to hear you've had a crack already.  Care to discuss what test you did, what you found and what it cost etc?

Cheers.

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  Reply # 356462 26-Jul-2010 12:55
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Re the faux double-glazing.

Are you planning to attach the sheets on the inside, or the outside of the windows ?

There is a lot of cold transferred thru single glazed windows, and even with heavy thermal drape curtains, you can feel the cold pouring out at the bottom of the curtains when next to a window or glass doors. There is only a few mm gap between the bottom of the curtain and the floor, but it just flows out. Brr !

I have been bunching up the curtains so they lie on the window sill, blocking any cold air movement to the floor, but it's not an optimal arrangement...





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  Reply # 356473 26-Jul-2010 13:06
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plastic drop cloths from bunnings etc are a translucent thin sheet. If you want clear I dont know what to suggest tho.




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  Reply # 356478 26-Jul-2010 13:12
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I put shower domes in at home, they are fantastic at reducing humidity. The shower box also stays nice and warm after your shower. Highly recommended.

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  Reply # 356481 26-Jul-2010 13:14
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I showered at a place with an enclosed shower and hated it, I dont know how a showerdome compares but I found the humidity got too bad in the shower and I had to turn the water temperature down so that it wasnt just a steamed up cubicle of doom type thing.




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 356482 26-Jul-2010 13:18
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SepticSceptic: Are you planning to attach the sheets on the inside, or the outside of the windows ?
It will have to be the outside I think, knowing this will not be ideal for the thin covering.  The 3M packs can be pulled a bit more rigid by heating with a hair dryer.  Anyway, for best thermal gap you want roughly 20mm spearation sort of thing, and I can get this easily with the profile of the existing aluminium frames, but only if mounted on the outside.  On the inside I'd only get say 5mm which is too close.

Re Curtains, I totally know what you mean!...
Lounge Curtains

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  Reply # 356484 26-Jul-2010 13:20
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Cool thermal image Jaxson, what did you take it with?



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  Reply # 356485 26-Jul-2010 13:20
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richms: I showered at a place with an enclosed shower and hated it, I dont know how a showerdome compares but I found the humidity got too bad in the shower and I had to turn the water temperature down so that it wasnt just a steamed up cubicle of doom type thing.


Seems to be either way, depending on the person.  Hence try first approach.  From what I hear a sealed cubicle lets no cool air enter and it doesn't get fogged up.  Some showers may be better than others at that.  Pros are that with less ventilation required there are no cold draughts and you can lower the shower temp because you'll then be warmer and less likely to be trying to heat the room. 



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  Reply # 356491 26-Jul-2010 13:25
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kiwitrc: Cool thermal image Jaxson, what did you take it with?

I have access to a Fluke thermal image camera here at work.  Did my new house with it and found points to improve on.  Through our eyes a ceiling just looks white, but through one of these puppies you can spot where your dollars are flowing out of the room....

eg my house decorative main front door...

My house front door.

And an internal door on the hallway leading to the internal access garage.

Hallway door through to internal access garage.


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  Reply # 356497 26-Jul-2010 13:31
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Love to get my hands on one of those.

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  Reply # 356500 26-Jul-2010 13:32
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I would love to have that thermal camera too!



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  Reply # 356506 26-Jul-2010 13:38
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Hoping I can give real results from any glazing tests I do.
I personally could put up with unattractive window coverings for a few months of the year in my kids rooms.  They're usually only for sleeping as such and are heated right through the night.
Our new house is a huge step up from our 90 year old villa, we now have insulation in the walls (wow!) and a concrete floor is a step up from pure floorboards only before! 

Aluminium windows are single glazed but at least seal well.  Anything I can do to address the windows will pretty much complete the rooms insulation wise but I got a quote for $3,000 to retrofit three bedrooms to double glazed.  I'm not saying that's excessive, probably about right, just I don't have that available right now.  Warmer windows would reduce the condensation problem there too, as modern homes are not as well ventilated as our old homestead was!

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  Reply # 356507 26-Jul-2010 13:41
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You are sorting the glass out, but unless the frames have thermal breaks in them, they are worse IME (short) with alu frames. Thats why I replaced the french door that was decrepid here with uPVC and double glazed glass when it needed doing.




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 356509 26-Jul-2010 13:45
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Yeah I've heard that's a much better way to go, though it hasn't taken off in NZ so much, yet. A cheap investigation first, replacing the frames is a bit of a jump, but still a very valid point, thanks. Hoping the reduction in losses from the larger surface area of the window will improve things, but will see.

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