Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




9 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 50128 23-Nov-2009 15:00

Will it make a difference which one i have for watching  My sky hdi or is full HD the way to go?

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
25472 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5276

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 275501 23-Nov-2009 15:22
Send private message

Most people would be unable to tell the difference between HD content on a 720p panel vs a 1080p panel - certainly for anything under a 40" TV.

The reality is now most TV's are full HD so it becomes rather meaningless.

1539 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 39

Trusted

  Reply # 275509 23-Nov-2009 15:45
Send private message

I would NOT buy a tv that is only HD ready as it will be old,

Like Sbiddle said most Tv's are full HD 1080p, so if you only buy a 720p HD ready tv your buying old technology

 
 
 
 


1440 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 123

Trusted

  Reply # 275516 23-Nov-2009 15:58
Send private message

plus most HD ready tvs run at 4:3 resolutions (non widescreen)

Example 1: http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/tvs-dvds/televisions/plasma-televisions/panasonic-th-p42x10z-42-hd-plasma-television/prod12318.html

Example 2: http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/tvs-dvds/televisions/plasma-televisions/samsung-ps42b450-42-hd-plasma-television/prod11685.html




CPU: Intel 3770k| RAM: F3-2400C10D-16GTX G.Skill Trident X |MB:  Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H-WB | GFX: GV-N660OC-2GD gv-n660oc-2gd GeForce GTX 660 | Monitor: Qnix 27" 2560x1440

 

Want to be with an awesome ISP? Want $20 credit too? Use this link to sign up to BigPipe.


25472 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5276

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 275518 23-Nov-2009 16:07
Send private message

mentalinc: plus most HD ready tvs run at 4:3 resolutions (non widescreen)

Example 1: http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/tvs-dvds/televisions/plasma-televisions/panasonic-th-p42x10z-42-hd-plasma-television/prod12318.html

Example 2: http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/tvs-dvds/televisions/plasma-televisions/samsung-ps42b450-42-hd-plasma-television/prod11685.html


I wouldn't go as far as saying it's normal for HD Ready TV's to only have a 4:3 resolution.

This is typically only the case with 42" Plasma panels that have a 1024x768 resolution and the odd 32" and 37" Plasma that may have appeared here. I don't think I've ever seen a 50" Plasma with a 1024x768 resolution and I certainly haven't seen a 16:9 LCD screen with a 1024x768 resolution for quite some time. It's also not an issue unless you're using a PC input where the issue becomes obvious.

8019 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 385

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 275556 23-Nov-2009 17:58
Send private message

I think it's a good idea to ensure you're getting a 1080p screen thesedays ie: full HD.

787 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 75


  Reply # 275708 24-Nov-2009 08:10
Send private message

We have Full HD 50" Plasma in the lounge for Blu-ray/MySky HDi and only have an 42" HD ready plasma in the bedroom being fed MySky HDi so don't really require a Full HD TV there.



9 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 275846 24-Nov-2009 15:56

clevedon, much difference between the two with pic quality?

787 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 75


  Reply # 275850 24-Nov-2009 16:08
Send private message

jerry77: clevedon, much difference between the two with pic quality?


MySky HDi is much the same on both, but Blu-ray on the 50" Panasonic is awesome viewing at 3 metres ( 7.1 HD surround sound certainly enhances the experience )

160 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 275872 24-Nov-2009 17:10
Send private message

My rule of thumb is that if you are buying 32 inch or smaller you are unlikely to spot a difference between HD ready (1366 x 720p/1080i) and full HD (1920 x 1080p) unless you habitually watch it from a distance of under 1 metre! And currently there is a price difference of roughly $500 between two 32" sets at these resolutions. So choose the one that best suits your pocket - as long as it has enough HDMI inputs for your requirements, for most requirements this will be 2 or 3. Remember too that if you are connecting devices to your TV via HDMI you won't have to worry about picture scaling (widescreen, 4:3 etc) because the picture signal carries this information and most sets will adjust to the correct aspect ratio automatically.

For TVs larger than 32" (37", 40", 42" etc.) you are likely to more easily see the difference between full HD and HD ready> So if your pocket can sustain the damage it's more important to buy full HD if you can. But also consider your content source. If you are going to be watching FreeviewHD, TV1 and TV2 are broadcast at 720p and TV3 at 1080i. So a HD ready TV should be all you need. If you are going to be watching Sky in HD via MySkyHDi it is broadcast at 1080i. So again an HD ready TV should be all you need. So you can save yourself a few dollars here too. The only source you are likely to get full HD content from is a blu ray DVD player playing content recorded in full HD. Frankly, I find a lot of blu ray content is not anything like 1080p. Some of it is barely good enough to qualify as SD, but that's another story.

I think a lot of people, me included, have purchased a full HD TV not realising it's not really going to deliver a tangeable benefit. However, we do have a warm and fuzzy feeling knowing we have the latest that should not need upgrading for at least a few more years.

192 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 3


  Reply # 275918 24-Nov-2009 19:02
Send private message

As Login say's "for watching My sky hdi" - HD Ready is all you need.

Save the dollars for the next TV when everything is in Full HD... Super thin LED TV's will be much cheaper by the time that happens! :)

25472 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5276

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 275952 24-Nov-2009 20:37
Send private message

login: My rule of thumb is that if you are buying 32 inch or smaller you are unlikely to spot a difference between HD ready (1376 x 1080i) and full HD (1920 x 1080p) unless you habitually watch it from a distance of under 1 metre!



Just as a minor correction HD ready is typically 1280x768/720 or 1366x768/720 depending on the panel type. It is not 1080 lines.

Full HD is 1920x1080 - and not necessarily progressive scan either - while the panel might be pregressive scan the TV doesn't necessarily support 1080p as a few people who purchased TV's in the past few years have discovered with cheap models from the likes of Philips that were 1920x1080 but only supported 1080i, not 1080p. I don't think there are any TV's now that are full HD that don't support 1080p but it wasn't the case with some early Full HD panels.



160 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 275970 24-Nov-2009 21:46
Send private message

Yes, quite right. My faux pas is now fixed. I myself had a HD ready TV at 1366 x 720p/1080i. I think any manufacturer trying to pass off a full HD TV now that only supported 720p/1080i and not 1080p would rightfully be labelled a fraud.

192 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 3


  Reply # 275985 24-Nov-2009 22:47
Send private message

login: Yes, quite right. My faux pas is now fixed. I myself had a HD ready TV at 1366 x 720p/1080i. I think any manufacturer trying to pass off a full HD TV now that only supported 720p/1080i and not 1080p would rightfully be labelled a fraud.


I'm sure there are few still around getting rid of old stock Frown I still have a 32" 720p/1080i LCD and its great for Sky HDi (using 720p) / PS3 using (1080i).

If you have the money go for a 1080p but the visual difference is minimal unless you have a large collection of Blu Ray disks?

2548 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 88


  Reply # 276209 25-Nov-2009 15:10
Send private message

32/37" - Get 1366x768 panel or 1280 x 720 panel
42+" - Get 1920 x 1080 panel

Avoid any panel that is 1024x768

I also think that it's wierd how they try to squeeze a few extra pixels and go from 720P:1280x720 -> '720P':1366x768,  I would of thought 1280x720 would be better for 1:1 mapping.  I understand why they choose 1366x768 this is the most pixels that will fit in 1mb chip.




HTPC: Intel i3-2100 / 12GB RAM / AMD HD7750 / 480 GB SSD / 58TB Storage / MediaPortal / MadVR / Win10
AVR: Pioneer Elite SC-LX87 220W 9.2 Ch AVR
Speakers: Wharfedale Jade 7 Fronts / Jade 2c Center / Jade 5 Rears
Subs: iNuke 3000dsp 3000W proamp with 4x 15" JBL Sealed Subs
Display: Samsung 60" UA60H6400 LCD TV
Accessories: Gefen HDMI Detective with splitter


2995 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 409

Subscriber

  Reply # 276241 25-Nov-2009 16:27
Send private message

Most 42" Plasmas prior to the introduction of Full HD panels were 1024x768. My Panna PV70 is exactly that. When fed a MySkyHDi signal I struggle to see much difference to the PZ850. The difference is that the pixels are rectangular rather than square and different scaling is involved. In fact because there is a lower percentage of the screen real estate taken up with pixel boundaries the screen is brighter than a PZ (or PY for that matter).
Does a PS3 play any games at 1080p? Might be a good reason to go full HD.




Areas of Geek interest: Home Theatre, HTPC, Android Tablets & Phones, iProducts.

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Vocus New Zealand on the block as Aussies bail
Posted 23-Oct-2017 17:06


Vodafone TV — television in the cloud
Posted 17-Oct-2017 19:29


Nokia 8 review: Classy midrange pure Android phone
Posted 16-Oct-2017 07:27


Why carriers might want to embrace Commerce Commission study, MVNOs
Posted 13-Oct-2017 09:42


Fitbit launches Ionic, its health and fitness smartwatch
Posted 12-Oct-2017 15:52


Xero launches machine learning automation to improve coding accuracy for small businesses
Posted 12-Oct-2017 15:45


Bank of New Zealand uses Intel AI to detect financial crime
Posted 12-Oct-2017 15:39


Sony launches Xperia XZ1, a smartphone with real-time 3D capture
Posted 11-Oct-2017 10:26


Notes on Nokia’s phone comeback
Posted 10-Oct-2017 10:06


Air New Zealand begins Inflight Wi-Fi rollout
Posted 9-Oct-2017 20:16


The latest mobile phones in perspective
Posted 9-Oct-2017 18:34


Review: Acronis True Image 2018 — serious backup
Posted 8-Oct-2017 11:22


Lenovo launches ThinkPad Anniversary Edition 25
Posted 7-Oct-2017 23:16


Less fone, more tech as Vodafone gets brand make-over
Posted 6-Oct-2017 08:16


API Talent Achieves AWS MSP Partner Status
Posted 5-Oct-2017 21:20



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.